A culinary online center dedicated to promoting the importance and the joy of American home cooking with an emphasis on local products and talent, celebrating the unique spirit and energy of the new food world ethos, especially in Vermont.

amuse bouche

I love quotes that add meaning to my life. Here are a few to live by:

How should I eat? (Not too much)
—Michael Pollan

If it is so difficult to learn to cook, how did all those early pioneer women manage to cross the country in rugged covered wagons and feed troops of people from one big pot hung over an open fire?
—Marion Cunningham, from Learning to Cook

Treat treats as treats.
—Michael Pollan

No matter how you slice it through, grain-fed meat production systems are a drain on the global food supply.
—Jonathan A. Foley, director of the Institute on the Environment, U of MN

A Farewell To The Green Mountain State

Screen Shot 2016-07-16 at 4.40.16 PM
I miss my wonderful assistant, Natalie Lovelace. She spent her last year and a half as an undergraduate at the University of Vermont running around the northern stretches of Vermont with me talking to people about food.
What a delight it was to have her as my blog manager. Natalie often, not only wrote, but photographed and posted stories for ITKWB. And she did a great job! But, the best part for us was meeting and interviewing the food producers –farmers, chefs, bakers, restauranteurs and food entrepreneurs that make Vermont a leader in food innovation. Natalie brought her intelligence, energy and curiosity to our quest for interesting tales to tell our readers. And we had so much fun!
Graduating in May with a major in Environmental Studies and a minor in Food Systems, but home now in California, I know she’s already lighting up her hometown of San Francisco!
When you get tired of all that sun, Natalie,  please  think about a return to Vermont. We miss you already!
Ă€ BientĂ´t,
bronwyn-signature11

 

***
IMG_6992_2

Bronwyn and I would often try to pin down what makes Vermont such a magical place, especially in terms of its thriving local food system. Since being back home in the Bay Area for the past couple months, it has become clearer to me that the locality of the food makes Burlington unlike any other place I know. In Burlington, I was not only walking distance from shops, restaurants, and the university itself, but also from the farms that provided much of its food. Here, local food is the norm. It is common for chefs to be cooking with produce that was harvested hours before; for people to personally know someone who has started a food-related business, and for people to know the story behind most of the products in their kitchen.

Now that I am back in California, I see that this is what makes Vermont so unique. Although there is a push for local food in the Bay Area, the reality is that the farms are far from the city. Farmers often have to commute hours to get their produce to market. This distance makes it more difficult to create relationships with those individuals that work to harvest the food on our plate, which in my opinion is the core to a local food system. As Bronwyn and I experienced through our interviews with different food entrepreneurs in Vermont, it is the stories behind the food that make it meaningful. For me, the closer I am to these stories, the more I appreciate the food on my plate.

Although it will be more difficult to find these stories, I know that it’s important for me to search these out. In fact, just this morning, I met a man named Max that started a coffee roasting company in my town that grows his own beans in Peru. As Max passionately described his methods of growing and harvesting, I was reminded of many of the food producers I had met in Vermont. Through working with Bronwyn, I have realized that although food nourishes the body, the connections we make with others nourishes the soul. I will always be thankful for Bronwyn and the passionate food artisans of Vermont for helping me to appreciate the true meaning of local.

Ă€ BientĂ´t,
Natalie

Screen Shot 2016-07-17 at 1.21.44 AM

***

Posted: 7-16-2016

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Screen Shot 2016-07-16 at 4.40.16 PM
I miss my wonderful assistant, Natalie Lovelace. She spent her last year and a half as an undergraduate at the University of Vermont running around the northern stretches of Vermont with me talking to people about food.
What a delight it was to have her as my blog manager. Natalie often, not only wrote, but photographed and posted stories for ITKWB. And she did a great job! But, the best part for us was meeting and interviewing the food producers –farmers, chefs, bakers, restauranteurs and food entrepreneurs that make Vermont a leader in food innovation. Natalie brought her intelligence, energy and curiosity to our quest for interesting tales to tell our readers. And we had so much fun!
Graduating in May with a major in Environmental Studies and a minor in Food Systems, but home now in California, I know she’s already lighting up her hometown of San Francisco!
When you get tired of all that sun, Natalie,  please  think about a return to Vermont. We miss you already!
Ă€ BientĂ´t, bronwyn-signature11
 

*** IMG_6992_2

Bronwyn and I would often try to pin down what makes Vermont such a magical place, especially in terms of its thriving local food system. Since being back home in the Bay Area for the past couple months, it has become clearer to me that the locality of the food makes Burlington unlike any other place I know. In Burlington, I was not only walking distance from shops, restaurants, and the university itself, but also from the farms that provided much of its food. Here, local food is the norm. It is common for chefs to be cooking with produce that was harvested hours before; for people to personally know someone who has started a food-related business, and for people to know the story behind most of the products in their kitchen.

Now that I am back in California, I see that this is what makes Vermont so unique. Although there is a push for local food in the Bay Area, the reality is that the farms are far from the city. Farmers often have to commute hours to get their produce to market. This distance makes it more difficult to create relationships with those individuals that work to harvest the food on our plate, which in my opinion is the core to a local food system. As Bronwyn and I experienced through our interviews with different food entrepreneurs in Vermont, it is the stories behind the food that make it meaningful. For me, the closer I am to these stories, the more I appreciate the food on my plate.

Although it will be more difficult to find these stories, I know that it’s important for me to search these out. In fact, just this morning, I met a man named Max that started a coffee roasting company in my town that grows his own beans in Peru. As Max passionately described his methods of growing and harvesting, I was reminded of many of the food producers I had met in Vermont. Through working with Bronwyn, I have realized that although food nourishes the body, the connections we make with others nourishes the soul. I will always be thankful for Bronwyn and the passionate food artisans of Vermont for helping me to appreciate the true meaning of local.

Ă€ BientĂ´t, Natalie

Screen Shot 2016-07-17 at 1.21.44 AM

***

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Screen Shot 2016-07-16 at 4.40.16 PM
I miss my wonderful assistant, Natalie Lovelace. She spent her last year and a half as an undergraduate at the University of Vermont running around the northern stretches of Vermont with me talking to people about food.
What a delight it was to have her as my blog manager. Natalie often, not only wrote, but photographed and posted stories for ITKWB. And she did a great job! But, the best part for us was meeting and interviewing the food producers –farmers, chefs, bakers, restauranteurs and food entrepreneurs that make Vermont a leader in food innovation. Natalie brought her intelligence, energy and curiosity to our quest for interesting tales to tell our readers. And we had so much fun!
Graduating in May with a major in Environmental Studies and a minor in Food Systems, but home now in California, I know she’s already lighting up her hometown of San Francisco!
When you get tired of all that sun, Natalie,  please  think about a return to Vermont. We miss you already!
Ă€ BientĂ´t, bronwyn-signature11
 

*** IMG_6992_2

Bronwyn and I would often try to pin down what makes Vermont such a magical place, especially in terms of its thriving local food system. Since being back home in the Bay Area for the past couple months, it has become clearer to me that the locality of the food makes Burlington unlike any other place I know. In Burlington, I was not only walking distance from shops, restaurants, and the university itself, but also from the farms that provided much of its food. Here, local food is the norm. It is common for chefs to be cooking with produce that was harvested hours before; for people to personally know someone who has started a food-related business, and for people to know the story behind most of the products in their kitchen.

Now that I am back in California, I see that this is what makes Vermont so unique. Although there is a push for local food in the Bay Area, the reality is that the farms are far from the city. Farmers often have to commute hours to get their produce to market. This distance makes it more difficult to create relationships with those individuals that work to harvest the food on our plate, which in my opinion is the core to a local food system. As Bronwyn and I experienced through our interviews with different food entrepreneurs in Vermont, it is the stories behind the food that make it meaningful. For me, the closer I am to these stories, the more I appreciate the food on my plate.

Although it will be more difficult to find these stories, I know that it’s important for me to search these out. In fact, just this morning, I met a man named Max that started a coffee roasting company in my town that grows his own beans in Peru. As Max passionately described his methods of growing and harvesting, I was reminded of many of the food producers I had met in Vermont. Through working with Bronwyn, I have realized that although food nourishes the body, the connections we make with others nourishes the soul. I will always be thankful for Bronwyn and the passionate food artisans of Vermont for helping me to appreciate the true meaning of local.

Ă€ BientĂ´t, Natalie

Screen Shot 2016-07-17 at 1.21.44 AM

***

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Screen Shot 2016-07-16 at 4.40.16 PM
I miss my wonderful assistant, Natalie Lovelace. She spent her last year and a half as an undergraduate at the University of Vermont running around the northern stretches of Vermont with me talking to people about food.
What a delight it was to have her as my blog manager. Natalie often, not only wrote, but photographed and posted stories for ITKWB. And she did a great job! But, the best part for us was meeting and interviewing the food producers –farmers, chefs, bakers, restauranteurs and food entrepreneurs that make Vermont a leader in food innovation. Natalie brought her intelligence, energy and curiosity to our quest for interesting tales to tell our readers. And we had so much fun!
Graduating in May with a major in Environmental Studies and a minor in Food Systems, but home now in California, I know she’s already lighting up her hometown of San Francisco!
When you get tired of all that sun, Natalie,  please  think about a return to Vermont. We miss you already!
Ă€ BientĂ´t, bronwyn-signature11
 

*** IMG_6992_2

Bronwyn and I would often try to pin down what makes Vermont such a magical place, especially in terms of its thriving local food system. Since being back home in the Bay Area for the past couple months, it has become clearer to me that the locality of the food makes Burlington unlike any other place I know. In Burlington, I was not only walking distance from shops, restaurants, and the university itself, but also from the farms that provided much of its food. Here, local food is the norm. It is common for chefs to be cooking with produce that was harvested hours before; for people to personally know someone who has started a food-related business, and for people to know the story behind most of the products in their kitchen.

Now that I am back in California, I see that this is what makes Vermont so unique. Although there is a push for local food in the Bay Area, the reality is that the farms are far from the city. Farmers often have to commute hours to get their produce to market. This distance makes it more difficult to create relationships with those individuals that work to harvest the food on our plate, which in my opinion is the core to a local food system. As Bronwyn and I experienced through our interviews with different food entrepreneurs in Vermont, it is the stories behind the food that make it meaningful. For me, the closer I am to these stories, the more I appreciate the food on my plate.

Although it will be more difficult to find these stories, I know that it’s important for me to search these out. In fact, just this morning, I met a man named Max that started a coffee roasting company in my town that grows his own beans in Peru. As Max passionately described his methods of growing and harvesting, I was reminded of many of the food producers I had met in Vermont. Through working with Bronwyn, I have realized that although food nourishes the body, the connections we make with others nourishes the soul. I will always be thankful for Bronwyn and the passionate food artisans of Vermont for helping me to appreciate the true meaning of local.

Ă€ BientĂ´t, Natalie

Screen Shot 2016-07-17 at 1.21.44 AM

***

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4 Responses to “A Farewell To The Green Mountain State”

  1. Margo Davis says:

    Natalie,

    Be my guest and come down to Palo Alto to our Sunday market!! You will be very impressed with the farmer’s and their produce albeit, they have traveled to get here. But, they are here….every Saturday and Sunday.

    Hope you are well in SF.

    Margo

  2. Margit Van Schaickj says:

    Bronwyn, how are you coming along on the book for which you and Natalie were researching? I’m very interested in the topic and looking forward to reading your book.

    • Bronwyn says:

      Hi Margit, We are mid-way with the book with a New York agent and an editor standing in the wings.

      Would love to know more about your interest. Are you a food systems/environmental writer, editor or are you interested in the farm world here in Vermont specifically. Would love to hear more!

  3. Just heard from Natalie that she’s working for a food market called Good Eggs that supplies SF customers with overnight delivery of fresh and prepared food direct from farmers in the area. Sounds like she’s found a perfect fit for her talents and interest…I’m hoping for a blog post or two from Natalie describing her experience. Who knows, maybe there could be a Good Eggs in every urban center one day providing fresh food to everyone!

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