A culinary online center dedicated to promoting the importance and the joy of American home cooking with an emphasis on local products and talent, celebrating the unique spirit and energy of the new food world ethos, especially in Vermont.

amuse bouche

I love quotes that add meaning to my life. Here are a few to live by:

How should I eat? (Not too much)
—Michael Pollan

If it is so difficult to learn to cook, how did all those early pioneer women manage to cross the country in rugged covered wagons and feed troops of people from one big pot hung over an open fire?
—Marion Cunningham, from Learning to Cook

Treat treats as treats.
—Michael Pollan

No matter how you slice it through, grain-fed meat production systems are a drain on the global food supply.
—Jonathan A. Foley, director of the Institute on the Environment, U of MN

A Love Affair with Fermented Fare

I want to ferment EVERYTHING.  After a couple batches of sauerkraut, tasty, yet lacking in creativity, I bought a giant bag of rejected, “ugly” carrots. You’ve seen them before, or it’s possible you haven’t noticed them, the “juicing carrots” hidden in a nondescript corner of the produce department.

They are misshapen, knobby, and broken.  They are the carrots too unsightly to be displayed for the discerning shopper to choose from an otherwise beautiful produce display.  These rejects are perfect for hiding in a clay pot to ferment to perfection.

I eagerly await the day when Western Medicine Doctors ask about diet and lifestyle when diagnosing and prescribing.  We aren’t there yet, but I believe we are getting close.  If you experience frequent heartburn, headaches, mystery allergies, IBS symptoms, etc., I’m not proposing this fermented carrot recipe will cure you, but questioning your diet and lifestyle will likely take you farther than a new pharmaceutical or some Tums®.

The best medicine we can give ourselves is in the food we eat.  Knowledge of gut health and the benefits of probiotics, such as those found in fermented foods, is becoming increasingly more commonplace.  Some even argue that we ARE our gut bacteria, as our gut health impacts our mood, digestion, and hormone balance (or imbalance!).  If any of this information surprises, shocks, or bewilders you, I highly recommend reading a book on the topic (try Brain Maker by David Perlmutter and Kristin Loberg).

Nutritious meets delicious with these tangy, crispy carrots, fermented with dill and shallot.  They are a great snack straight from the jar or a colorful addition to a dinner plate.  I was inspired by MakeSauerkraut.com

What you’ll need:

Carrots (as much as you have room for in your fermentation vessel)

Flavors (mix and match herbs and spices: garlic, mint, ginger, jalepeño, onion, dill, cardamom, peppercorn, the list goes on)

Sea Salt

Filtered water

Glass jar with tight sealing lid or fermentation crock

What you’ll do:

Mix enough salt water (1 Tbsp salt per 2 cups water) to cover your carrots.  Pick your flavors (I used dill, sliced shallot, and peppercorn) and place at the bottom of your vessel.  Use a glass jar with tightly sealing lid or a fermentation crock.  Do not use plastic or metal.

Slice carrots into 1/4″ carrot sticks, making them 1″ shorter in length than the vessel they will be stored in.  Choose organic and don’t use baby carrots, as they are often treated to maintain color and will not ferment.  Squeeze carrot slices into the vessel on top of the garnishes, and then pour salt water over the carrots.  Be sure carrots are completely covered in water, otherwise mold may grow.

Let sit in a dark place for 1-3 weeks.  If using a jar, burp the jar every day or two to let gasses escape.  Taste after one week, and age until desired flavor is reached.  Move to the fridge when they taste to your liking!  Note they will ferment more quickly in warmer in temperatures.  What takes one week in the summer may take three weeks in the winter.  I fermented mine for three weeks, and despite those of you who may have spring weather, it is still very much winter in Vermont!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

Posted: 3-24-2019

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They are misshapen, knobby, and broken.  They are the carrots too unsightly to be displayed for the discerning shopper to choose from an otherwise beautiful produce display.  These rejects are perfect for hiding in a clay pot to ferment to perfection.



I eagerly await the day when Western Medicine Doctors ask about diet and lifestyle when diagnosing and prescribing.  We aren't there yet, but I believe we are getting close.  If you experience frequent heartburn, headaches, mystery allergies, IBS symptoms, etc., I'm not proposing this fermented carrot recipe will cure you, but questioning your diet and lifestyle will likely take you farther than a new pharmaceutical or some Tums®.



The best medicine we can give ourselves is in the food we eat.  Knowledge of gut health and the benefits of probiotics, such as those found in fermented foods, is becoming increasingly more commonplace.  Some even argue that we ARE our gut bacteria, as our gut health impacts our mood, digestion, and hormone balance (or imbalance!).  If any of this information surprises, shocks, or bewilders you, I highly recommend reading a book on the topic (try Brain Maker by David Perlmutter and Kristin Loberg).



Nutritious meets delicious with these tangy, crispy carrots, fermented with dill and shallot.  They are a great snack straight from the jar or a colorful addition to a dinner plate.  I was inspired by MakeSauerkraut.com

What you'll need:

Carrots (as much as you have room for in your fermentation vessel)

Flavors (mix and match herbs and spices: garlic, mint, ginger, jalepeño, onion, dill, cardamom, peppercorn, the list goes on)

Sea Salt

Filtered water

Glass jar with tight sealing lid or fermentation crock

What you'll do:

Mix enough salt water (1 Tbsp salt per 2 cups water) to cover your carrots.  Pick your flavors (I used dill, sliced shallot, and peppercorn) and place at the bottom of your vessel.  Use a glass jar with tightly sealing lid or a fermentation crock.  Do not use plastic or metal.

Slice carrots into 1/4" carrot sticks, making them 1" shorter in length than the vessel they will be stored in.  Choose organic and don't use baby carrots, as they are often treated to maintain color and will not ferment.  Squeeze carrot slices into the vessel on top of the garnishes, and then pour salt water over the carrots.  Be sure carrots are completely covered in water, otherwise mold may grow.

Let sit in a dark place for 1-3 weeks.  If using a jar, burp the jar every day or two to let gasses escape.  Taste after one week, and age until desired flavor is reached.  Move to the fridge when they taste to your liking!  Note they will ferment more quickly in warmer in temperatures.  What takes one week in the summer may take three weeks in the winter.  I fermented mine for three weeks, and despite those of you who may have spring weather, it is still very much winter in Vermont!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin"
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They are misshapen, knobby, and broken.  They are the carrots too unsightly to be displayed for the discerning shopper to choose from an otherwise beautiful produce display.  These rejects are perfect for hiding in a clay pot to ferment to perfection.



I eagerly await the day when Western Medicine Doctors ask about diet and lifestyle when diagnosing and prescribing.  We aren't there yet, but I believe we are getting close.  If you experience frequent heartburn, headaches, mystery allergies, IBS symptoms, etc., I'm not proposing this fermented carrot recipe will cure you, but questioning your diet and lifestyle will likely take you farther than a new pharmaceutical or some Tums®.



The best medicine we can give ourselves is in the food we eat.  Knowledge of gut health and the benefits of probiotics, such as those found in fermented foods, is becoming increasingly more commonplace.  Some even argue that we ARE our gut bacteria, as our gut health impacts our mood, digestion, and hormone balance (or imbalance!).  If any of this information surprises, shocks, or bewilders you, I highly recommend reading a book on the topic (try Brain Maker by David Perlmutter and Kristin Loberg).



Nutritious meets delicious with these tangy, crispy carrots, fermented with dill and shallot.  They are a great snack straight from the jar or a colorful addition to a dinner plate.  I was inspired by MakeSauerkraut.com

What you'll need:

Carrots (as much as you have room for in your fermentation vessel)

Flavors (mix and match herbs and spices: garlic, mint, ginger, jalepeño, onion, dill, cardamom, peppercorn, the list goes on)

Sea Salt

Filtered water

Glass jar with tight sealing lid or fermentation crock

What you'll do:

Mix enough salt water (1 Tbsp salt per 2 cups water) to cover your carrots.  Pick your flavors (I used dill, sliced shallot, and peppercorn) and place at the bottom of your vessel.  Use a glass jar with tightly sealing lid or a fermentation crock.  Do not use plastic or metal.

Slice carrots into 1/4" carrot sticks, making them 1" shorter in length than the vessel they will be stored in.  Choose organic and don't use baby carrots, as they are often treated to maintain color and will not ferment.  Squeeze carrot slices into the vessel on top of the garnishes, and then pour salt water over the carrots.  Be sure carrots are completely covered in water, otherwise mold may grow.

Let sit in a dark place for 1-3 weeks.  If using a jar, burp the jar every day or two to let gasses escape.  Taste after one week, and age until desired flavor is reached.  Move to the fridge when they taste to your liking!  Note they will ferment more quickly in warmer in temperatures.  What takes one week in the summer may take three weeks in the winter.  I fermented mine for three weeks, and despite those of you who may have spring weather, it is still very much winter in Vermont!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin"
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They are misshapen, knobby, and broken.  They are the carrots too unsightly to be displayed for the discerning shopper to choose from an otherwise beautiful produce display.  These rejects are perfect for hiding in a clay pot to ferment to perfection.



I eagerly await the day when Western Medicine Doctors ask about diet and lifestyle when diagnosing and prescribing.  We aren't there yet, but I believe we are getting close.  If you experience frequent heartburn, headaches, mystery allergies, IBS symptoms, etc., I'm not proposing this fermented carrot recipe will cure you, but questioning your diet and lifestyle will likely take you farther than a new pharmaceutical or some Tums®.



The best medicine we can give ourselves is in the food we eat.  Knowledge of gut health and the benefits of probiotics, such as those found in fermented foods, is becoming increasingly more commonplace.  Some even argue that we ARE our gut bacteria, as our gut health impacts our mood, digestion, and hormone balance (or imbalance!).  If any of this information surprises, shocks, or bewilders you, I highly recommend reading a book on the topic (try Brain Maker by David Perlmutter and Kristin Loberg).



Nutritious meets delicious with these tangy, crispy carrots, fermented with dill and shallot.  They are a great snack straight from the jar or a colorful addition to a dinner plate.  I was inspired by MakeSauerkraut.com

What you'll need:

Carrots (as much as you have room for in your fermentation vessel)

Flavors (mix and match herbs and spices: garlic, mint, ginger, jalepeño, onion, dill, cardamom, peppercorn, the list goes on)

Sea Salt

Filtered water

Glass jar with tight sealing lid or fermentation crock

What you'll do:

Mix enough salt water (1 Tbsp salt per 2 cups water) to cover your carrots.  Pick your flavors (I used dill, sliced shallot, and peppercorn) and place at the bottom of your vessel.  Use a glass jar with tightly sealing lid or a fermentation crock.  Do not use plastic or metal.

Slice carrots into 1/4" carrot sticks, making them 1" shorter in length than the vessel they will be stored in.  Choose organic and don't use baby carrots, as they are often treated to maintain color and will not ferment.  Squeeze carrot slices into the vessel on top of the garnishes, and then pour salt water over the carrots.  Be sure carrots are completely covered in water, otherwise mold may grow.

Let sit in a dark place for 1-3 weeks.  If using a jar, burp the jar every day or two to let gasses escape.  Taste after one week, and age until desired flavor is reached.  Move to the fridge when they taste to your liking!  Note they will ferment more quickly in warmer in temperatures.  What takes one week in the summer may take three weeks in the winter.  I fermented mine for three weeks, and despite those of you who may have spring weather, it is still very much winter in Vermont!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin"
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4 responses to “A Love Affair with Fermented Fare”

  1. connie says:

    Can’t wait to try, My onion soup for soul was great. Still have some in the freezer.
    Please keep up the helpful and healthful recipes.

    Connie

    • Corrie says:

      Connie,
      I’m so glad the soup was a success for you. The more soups and stews I make, the more I realize wine and vinegar are necessary ingredients for a rich broth.
      Fermented foods can be an acquired taste, but I certainly enjoy them. Hope you do too!
      Corrie

  2. Just looking at the latest post with friend, Suzanne Cronkite, here in Santa Fe. Love it! Terrific photos. Made us both eager to try your fermentation recipe. And, you have another customer for your sauerkraut. Suzanne said, “Sign me up!”It’s on my list when I am home, again….xox

    • Corrie says:

      Bronwyn,
      I’ve been enjoying the fermenting so much! I’m glad to hear folks are interested in partaking. I have some asparagus in process as we speak. Yumm!
      Miss you and glad you’re enjoying your stay!
      Corrie

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  • Strawberry Rhubarb Salsa - Jul 2018
  • Egg White Casserole with Sweet Potato Crust - Apr 2018
  • Chicken Dijonaise – Slow Cooker: The Best Cookbook Ever - Feb 2018
  • Winter Root Soup – Nourishing Traditions - Feb 2018
  • Soooo Many Momos - Sep 2017
  • SautĂ©ed Fiddleheads in Butter with Lemon and Garlic - May 2017
  • A Recipe for the Holidays from Shelburne Farms - Nov 2013
  • The “Zetterburger” Recipe - Aug 2013
  • Homemade Fresh Mozzarella Recipe - Jul 2013
  • Twin Farms’ Gluten-Free SoufflĂ© Pancake Recipe - Jun 2013
  • Potato Salad Two Ways - Mar 2013
  • It’s Easy Being Green—If You’re a Soup! - Feb 2013
  • For The Love of Valentine’s Day, A Chocolate Mousse - Feb 2013
  • Happy New Year Resolutions – Roasted Root Vegetables - Jan 2013
  • The Best Cheesecake in the World - Dec 2012
  • Tarte aux Pommes – A Holiday Gift to You - Dec 2012
  • A Thanksgiving Memory with a Memorable Brining Recipe - Nov 2012
  • Chicken with Artichokes & Honey – The Recipe - Nov 2012
  • Alison Baker’s Tomato Coconut Soup - Oct 2012
  • Basil, Lettuce and Tomato Sandwich – The Recipe - Oct 2012
  • Cold Pea Soup- The Recipe - Sep 2012
  • Onion Tart with Anchovies & Black Olives- Recipe for Pissaladiere Nicoise - Sep 2012
  • Boeuf Bourguignon - Apr 2012
  • Gingery Shrimp with Asparagus and Edamame - Apr 2012
  • Salisbury Steak - Apr 2012