A culinary online center dedicated to promoting the importance and the joy of American home cooking with an emphasis on local products and talent, celebrating the unique spirit and energy of the new food world ethos, especially in Vermont.

amuse bouche

I love quotes that add meaning to my life. Here are a few to live by:

How should I eat? (Not too much)
—Michael Pollan

If it is so difficult to learn to cook, how did all those early pioneer women manage to cross the country in rugged covered wagons and feed troops of people from one big pot hung over an open fire?
—Marion Cunningham, from Learning to Cook

Treat treats as treats.
—Michael Pollan

No matter how you slice it through, grain-fed meat production systems are a drain on the global food supply.
—Jonathan A. Foley, director of the Institute on the Environment, U of MN

A Rare Book Indeed

Love Me Feed Me by Judith JonesA Labor of Love
As most of you know who read my blog or follow me on Facebook, my stepmother, Judith Jones, is ninety years old this year. For the last three years, ever since her retirement, she’s been working on a book       about cooking meals for her beloved dog, Mabon. This has truly been a labor of love.

An Exuberant Havanese
While researching and writing the book, Judith has gone through hundreds of periodicals on animal nutrition, thousands of hours cooking for and feeding her exuberant Havanese and taking diligent notes. She has done all of this with the passion and single-mindedness that marked her career as one of the publishing worlds most iconic editors. She has succeeded in producing a charming book, a book for dog lovers and for those who have followed Judith’s career and admired her talent.

Love Me, Feed Me
Judith’s book, Love Me, Feed Me, is a tribute to the many dogs in her life, and her love of food. Her career as an editor and writer of cookbooks is legend, so it is no surprise that the book contains recipes seasoned by her knowledge of delicious food and the best home cooking.

Wall Street Journal Interview
Below is the delightful interview that appeared in The Wall Street Journal earlier this month that beautifully captures all the spirit and energy of Judith’s ninety years and counting. I hope you will enjoy it.
See the full article with additional photos and Judith’s recipe for Pork and Ham Croquettes.

A Bientot,

bronwyn-signature

 

 

A Visit to the Kitchen of Legendary Cookbook Editor Judith Jones

The acclaimed editor and author, Judith Jones, prepares a recipe for pork and ham croquettes from her new book, “Love Me, Feed Me.”

By Charlotte Druckman

NEXT TIME YOU’RE feeling uninspired or too lazy to cook, think of Judith Jones, the book editor who introduced the world to Julia Child as well as food legends James Beard, Marcella Hazan, Edna Lewis and Madhur Jaffrey. Her legacy also includes three books co-authored with her late husband, Evan Jones, and three of her own. At 90 years old, she continues to make supper nearly every night, and to eat it at a table beside a wall of hanging pots in her kitchen on New York City’s Upper East Side. “It’s sort of indecent,” she said, “because sometimes, I begin to think around 4 o’clock, ‘Hm, is it almost time to start cooking?’ ” These days, she cooks mostly for herself and her Havanese dog, Mabon. To help others do the same, she wrote “Love Me, Feed Me: Sharing With Your Dog the Everyday Good Food You Cook and Enjoy,” published last month by Knopf. Even those without canine companions are sure to find Ms. Jones’s simple recipes—and her delight in sharing them—highly motivating.

EATING HER WORDS | Judith Jones in her Manhattan kitchen
EATING HER WORDS | Judith Jones in her Manhattan kitchen Stephen Kent Johnson for The Wall Street Journal

The thing that most people notice first about my kitchen is: all these hanging pots. I think hiding all your wonderful pots and pans is an expression of my mother’s generation, when a kitchen was just utilitarian; nobody had fun in there.

The tools I can’t live without are: a wooden spatula and a wooden fork. Wood doesn’t scrape the bottom of your pans so much. It’s gentle.

The cookbook I turn to again and again is: “Mastering the Art of French Cooking.” [Julia Child’s] wonderfully analytic way of expressing what is special about French cooking—and how to translate it to the American kitchen—was thrilling. I still go back when I’m sort of refreshing myself: “Well, what did Julia say about that?”

The pot I reach for most is: the smallest size Le Creuset [enameled cast-iron] saucepan. I have it in copper, too. That’s just great for Mabon and me. It’s sometimes the pots that make you a better cook, so people should get pots that are pure and efficient and well-made. Good ones last a lifetime.

At this time of year, my favorite thing to eat is: root vegetables. Growing up, most of the winter we had turnips and parsnips. I remember when the first asparagus would appear in the spring, I would just cry with delight! I think that’s rather good for your palate, to hold back for when a vegetable is really ready.

I first became interested in food: when I went abroad with my husband. My awakening was clearly in France. I tell the story, in this new book, of [chef-restaurateur] Fernand Point having us in for a lunch. He didn’t know who we were; we were just scruffy Americans. But that was a great experience—a turning point, in a way, in my life. And then I had a Hungarian sister-in-law, and she introduced me to Hungarian food. She was born a countess and then she met Mr. Jones, my husband’s brother. From countess to Jones, what a tumble.

When I entertain, I like to: keep it simpler these days. When I entertained after I first came back from France, it was four courses. Always something with the drink. The main course or fish course, with a vegetable garnish—at least one—and a starch garnish. Now we’re finally up to the salad, and cheese. And, well, that’s a lot of stuff. And then dessert and coffee. Now I’d be more likely to do what I call a “made dish.” It’s all cooked and ready, and you pop it into the oven to reheat.

I don’t like it when my dinner guests: bring something. I think we’re doing too much of that. It ruins the dinner. You plan a beautifully balanced meal, and then in comes a cupcake and people feel they have to taste it and ooh and aah, and it has nothing to do with your dinner. A bottle of wine is nice and helpful, and sometimes some cheese.

I like to drink: Campari. It just cleanses me somehow and gets me ready for dinner. It’s actually better, I think, than a glass of wine on an empty stomach. But once we’re into the food, I’m a good wine drinker.

A typical breakfast for me is: my own granola with Vermont maple syrup. And I have some blueberries and bananas. If I’m in Paris, it’s a croissant and café au lait, with the lait, you know, warm and almost bubbling on the top. I love breakfast. And then I love lunch.

On weeknights, I often cook: some wonderful pork tenderloins. Usually what I end up doing is making a roast with vegetables around. It’s so simple. And then I have some left for a quick stir-fry with vegetables the next night. Or a little hash. I love hashes: You open your fridge and you see what’s in there, so they’re always a little bit different.

One of the most underrated foods is: again, root vegetables. It’s interesting to use them in different ways—not just as a separate vegetable, but, say, in a ravioli. They’re new tastes, and yet familiar. I think if you reach too hard for the new, it’s a mistake.

A food trend I’m totally over is: kale. I was trying new green vegetables on my dog, Mabon. So, with all this talk that you could hardly survive without eating kale three times a day, I decided to try a little bit. I stir-fried it and put three little clumps in his dish. And he sniffed each clump, picked each one up and put it over there, and there, and there—and walked away. I was proud of him. Good boy!

—Edited from an interview by Charlotte Druckman

Posted: 11-21-2014

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As most of you know who read my blog or follow me on Facebook, my stepmother, Judith Jones, is ninety years old this year. For the last three years, ever since her retirement, she’s been working on a book       about cooking meals for her beloved dog, Mabon. This has truly been a labor of love.

An Exuberant Havanese
While researching and writing the book, Judith has gone through hundreds of periodicals on animal nutrition, thousands of hours cooking for and feeding her exuberant Havanese and taking diligent notes. She has done all of this with the passion and single-mindedness that marked her career as one of the publishing worlds most iconic editors. She has succeeded in producing a charming book, a book for dog lovers and for those who have followed Judith’s career and admired her talent.

Love Me, Feed Me
Judith’s book, Love Me, Feed Me, is a tribute to the many dogs in her life, and her love of food. Her career as an editor and writer of cookbooks is legend, so it is no surprise that the book contains recipes seasoned by her knowledge of delicious food and the best home cooking.

Wall Street Journal Interview
Below is the delightful interview that appeared in The Wall Street Journal earlier this month that beautifully captures all the spirit and energy of Judith’s ninety years and counting. I hope you will enjoy it.
See the full article with additional photos and Judith's recipe for Pork and Ham Croquettes.

A Bientot,

bronwyn-signature

 

 

A Visit to the Kitchen of Legendary Cookbook Editor Judith Jones

The acclaimed editor and author, Judith Jones, prepares a recipe for pork and ham croquettes from her new book, “Love Me, Feed Me."
By Charlotte Druckman
NEXT TIME YOU’RE feeling uninspired or too lazy to cook, think of Judith Jones, the book editor who introduced the world to Julia Child as well as food legends James Beard, Marcella Hazan, Edna Lewis and Madhur Jaffrey. Her legacy also includes three books co-authored with her late husband, Evan Jones, and three of her own. At 90 years old, she continues to make supper nearly every night, and to eat it at a table beside a wall of hanging pots in her kitchen on New York City’s Upper East Side. “It’s sort of indecent,” she said, “because sometimes, I begin to think around 4 o’clock, ‘Hm, is it almost time to start cooking?’ ” These days, she cooks mostly for herself and her Havanese dog, Mabon. To help others do the same, she wrote “Love Me, Feed Me: Sharing With Your Dog the Everyday Good Food You Cook and Enjoy,” published last month by Knopf. Even those without canine companions are sure to find Ms. Jones’s simple recipes—and her delight in sharing them—highly motivating.
EATING HER WORDS | Judith Jones in her Manhattan kitchen
EATING HER WORDS | Judith Jones in her Manhattan kitchen Stephen Kent Johnson for The Wall Street Journal
The thing that most people notice first about my kitchen is: all these hanging pots. I think hiding all your wonderful pots and pans is an expression of my mother’s generation, when a kitchen was just utilitarian; nobody had fun in there. The tools I can’t live without are: a wooden spatula and a wooden fork. Wood doesn’t scrape the bottom of your pans so much. It’s gentle. The cookbook I turn to again and again is: “Mastering the Art of French Cooking.” [Julia Child’s] wonderfully analytic way of expressing what is special about French cooking—and how to translate it to the American kitchen—was thrilling. I still go back when I’m sort of refreshing myself: “Well, what did Julia say about that?” The pot I reach for most is: the smallest size Le Creuset [enameled cast-iron] saucepan. I have it in copper, too. That’s just great for Mabon and me. It’s sometimes the pots that make you a better cook, so people should get pots that are pure and efficient and well-made. Good ones last a lifetime. At this time of year, my favorite thing to eat is: root vegetables. Growing up, most of the winter we had turnips and parsnips. I remember when the first asparagus would appear in the spring, I would just cry with delight! I think that’s rather good for your palate, to hold back for when a vegetable is really ready. I first became interested in food: when I went abroad with my husband. My awakening was clearly in France. I tell the story, in this new book, of [chef-restaurateur] Fernand Point having us in for a lunch. He didn’t know who we were; we were just scruffy Americans. But that was a great experience—a turning point, in a way, in my life. And then I had a Hungarian sister-in-law, and she introduced me to Hungarian food. She was born a countess and then she met Mr. Jones, my husband’s brother. From countess to Jones, what a tumble.
When I entertain, I like to: keep it simpler these days. When I entertained after I first came back from France, it was four courses. Always something with the drink. The main course or fish course, with a vegetable garnish—at least one—and a starch garnish. Now we’re finally up to the salad, and cheese. And, well, that’s a lot of stuff. And then dessert and coffee. Now I’d be more likely to do what I call a “made dish.” It’s all cooked and ready, and you pop it into the oven to reheat.
I don’t like it when my dinner guests: bring something. I think we’re doing too much of that. It ruins the dinner. You plan a beautifully balanced meal, and then in comes a cupcake and people feel they have to taste it and ooh and aah, and it has nothing to do with your dinner. A bottle of wine is nice and helpful, and sometimes some cheese. I like to drink: Campari. It just cleanses me somehow and gets me ready for dinner. It’s actually better, I think, than a glass of wine on an empty stomach. But once we’re into the food, I’m a good wine drinker. A typical breakfast for me is: my own granola with Vermont maple syrup. And I have some blueberries and bananas. If I’m in Paris, it’s a croissant and café au lait, with the lait, you know, warm and almost bubbling on the top. I love breakfast. And then I love lunch. On weeknights, I often cook: some wonderful pork tenderloins. Usually what I end up doing is making a roast with vegetables around. It’s so simple. And then I have some left for a quick stir-fry with vegetables the next night. Or a little hash. I love hashes: You open your fridge and you see what’s in there, so they’re always a little bit different. One of the most underrated foods is: again, root vegetables. It’s interesting to use them in different ways—not just as a separate vegetable, but, say, in a ravioli. They’re new tastes, and yet familiar. I think if you reach too hard for the new, it’s a mistake. A food trend I’m totally over is: kale. I was trying new green vegetables on my dog, Mabon. So, with all this talk that you could hardly survive without eating kale three times a day, I decided to try a little bit. I stir-fried it and put three little clumps in his dish. And he sniffed each clump, picked each one up and put it over there, and there, and there—and walked away. I was proud of him. Good boy! —Edited from an interview by Charlotte Druckman
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A Visit to the Kitchen of Legendary Cookbook Editor Judith Jones

The acclaimed editor and author, Judith Jones, prepares a recipe for pork and ham croquettes from her new book, “Love Me, Feed Me."
By Charlotte Druckman
NEXT TIME YOU’RE feeling uninspired or too lazy to cook, think of Judith Jones, the book editor who introduced the world to Julia Child as well as food legends James Beard, Marcella Hazan, Edna Lewis and Madhur Jaffrey. Her legacy also includes three books co-authored with her late husband, Evan Jones, and three of her own. At 90 years old, she continues to make supper nearly every night, and to eat it at a table beside a wall of hanging pots in her kitchen on New York City’s Upper East Side. “It’s sort of indecent,” she said, “because sometimes, I begin to think around 4 o’clock, ‘Hm, is it almost time to start cooking?’ ” These days, she cooks mostly for herself and her Havanese dog, Mabon. To help others do the same, she wrote “Love Me, Feed Me: Sharing With Your Dog the Everyday Good Food You Cook and Enjoy,” published last month by Knopf. Even those without canine companions are sure to find Ms. Jones’s simple recipes—and her delight in sharing them—highly motivating.
EATING HER WORDS | Judith Jones in her Manhattan kitchen
EATING HER WORDS | Judith Jones in her Manhattan kitchen Stephen Kent Johnson for The Wall Street Journal
The thing that most people notice first about my kitchen is: all these hanging pots. I think hiding all your wonderful pots and pans is an expression of my mother’s generation, when a kitchen was just utilitarian; nobody had fun in there. The tools I can’t live without are: a wooden spatula and a wooden fork. Wood doesn’t scrape the bottom of your pans so much. It’s gentle. The cookbook I turn to again and again is: “Mastering the Art of French Cooking.” [Julia Child’s] wonderfully analytic way of expressing what is special about French cooking—and how to translate it to the American kitchen—was thrilling. I still go back when I’m sort of refreshing myself: “Well, what did Julia say about that?” The pot I reach for most is: the smallest size Le Creuset [enameled cast-iron] saucepan. I have it in copper, too. That’s just great for Mabon and me. It’s sometimes the pots that make you a better cook, so people should get pots that are pure and efficient and well-made. Good ones last a lifetime. At this time of year, my favorite thing to eat is: root vegetables. Growing up, most of the winter we had turnips and parsnips. I remember when the first asparagus would appear in the spring, I would just cry with delight! I think that’s rather good for your palate, to hold back for when a vegetable is really ready. I first became interested in food: when I went abroad with my husband. My awakening was clearly in France. I tell the story, in this new book, of [chef-restaurateur] Fernand Point having us in for a lunch. He didn’t know who we were; we were just scruffy Americans. But that was a great experience—a turning point, in a way, in my life. And then I had a Hungarian sister-in-law, and she introduced me to Hungarian food. She was born a countess and then she met Mr. Jones, my husband’s brother. From countess to Jones, what a tumble.
When I entertain, I like to: keep it simpler these days. When I entertained after I first came back from France, it was four courses. Always something with the drink. The main course or fish course, with a vegetable garnish—at least one—and a starch garnish. Now we’re finally up to the salad, and cheese. And, well, that’s a lot of stuff. And then dessert and coffee. Now I’d be more likely to do what I call a “made dish.” It’s all cooked and ready, and you pop it into the oven to reheat.
I don’t like it when my dinner guests: bring something. I think we’re doing too much of that. It ruins the dinner. You plan a beautifully balanced meal, and then in comes a cupcake and people feel they have to taste it and ooh and aah, and it has nothing to do with your dinner. A bottle of wine is nice and helpful, and sometimes some cheese. I like to drink: Campari. It just cleanses me somehow and gets me ready for dinner. It’s actually better, I think, than a glass of wine on an empty stomach. But once we’re into the food, I’m a good wine drinker. A typical breakfast for me is: my own granola with Vermont maple syrup. And I have some blueberries and bananas. If I’m in Paris, it’s a croissant and café au lait, with the lait, you know, warm and almost bubbling on the top. I love breakfast. And then I love lunch. On weeknights, I often cook: some wonderful pork tenderloins. Usually what I end up doing is making a roast with vegetables around. It’s so simple. And then I have some left for a quick stir-fry with vegetables the next night. Or a little hash. I love hashes: You open your fridge and you see what’s in there, so they’re always a little bit different. One of the most underrated foods is: again, root vegetables. It’s interesting to use them in different ways—not just as a separate vegetable, but, say, in a ravioli. They’re new tastes, and yet familiar. I think if you reach too hard for the new, it’s a mistake. A food trend I’m totally over is: kale. I was trying new green vegetables on my dog, Mabon. So, with all this talk that you could hardly survive without eating kale three times a day, I decided to try a little bit. I stir-fried it and put three little clumps in his dish. And he sniffed each clump, picked each one up and put it over there, and there, and there—and walked away. I was proud of him. Good boy! —Edited from an interview by Charlotte Druckman
" ["post_title"]=> string(18) "A Rare Book Indeed" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(177) "Read this delightful Wall Street Journal interview featuring my stepmother Judith Jones and her new cookbook, Feed Me, Love Me written with her beloved Havanese, Mabon, in mind." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(18) "a-rare-book-indeed" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2014-11-21 22:39:09" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2014-11-21 22:39:09" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=3509" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(2) "10" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["queried_object"]=> object(WP_Post)#371 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(3509) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2014-11-21 16:30:32" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2014-11-21 16:30:32" ["post_content"]=> string(9656) "Love Me Feed Me by Judith JonesA Labor of Love As most of you know who read my blog or follow me on Facebook, my stepmother, Judith Jones, is ninety years old this year. For the last three years, ever since her retirement, she’s been working on a book       about cooking meals for her beloved dog, Mabon. This has truly been a labor of love. An Exuberant Havanese While researching and writing the book, Judith has gone through hundreds of periodicals on animal nutrition, thousands of hours cooking for and feeding her exuberant Havanese and taking diligent notes. She has done all of this with the passion and single-mindedness that marked her career as one of the publishing worlds most iconic editors. She has succeeded in producing a charming book, a book for dog lovers and for those who have followed Judith’s career and admired her talent. Love Me, Feed Me Judith’s book, Love Me, Feed Me, is a tribute to the many dogs in her life, and her love of food. Her career as an editor and writer of cookbooks is legend, so it is no surprise that the book contains recipes seasoned by her knowledge of delicious food and the best home cooking. Wall Street Journal Interview Below is the delightful interview that appeared in The Wall Street Journal earlier this month that beautifully captures all the spirit and energy of Judith’s ninety years and counting. I hope you will enjoy it. See the full article with additional photos and Judith's recipe for Pork and Ham Croquettes. A Bientot, bronwyn-signature  

 

A Visit to the Kitchen of Legendary Cookbook Editor Judith Jones

The acclaimed editor and author, Judith Jones, prepares a recipe for pork and ham croquettes from her new book, “Love Me, Feed Me."
By Charlotte Druckman
NEXT TIME YOU’RE feeling uninspired or too lazy to cook, think of Judith Jones, the book editor who introduced the world to Julia Child as well as food legends James Beard, Marcella Hazan, Edna Lewis and Madhur Jaffrey. Her legacy also includes three books co-authored with her late husband, Evan Jones, and three of her own. At 90 years old, she continues to make supper nearly every night, and to eat it at a table beside a wall of hanging pots in her kitchen on New York City’s Upper East Side. “It’s sort of indecent,” she said, “because sometimes, I begin to think around 4 o’clock, ‘Hm, is it almost time to start cooking?’ ” These days, she cooks mostly for herself and her Havanese dog, Mabon. To help others do the same, she wrote “Love Me, Feed Me: Sharing With Your Dog the Everyday Good Food You Cook and Enjoy,” published last month by Knopf. Even those without canine companions are sure to find Ms. Jones’s simple recipes—and her delight in sharing them—highly motivating.
EATING HER WORDS | Judith Jones in her Manhattan kitchen
EATING HER WORDS | Judith Jones in her Manhattan kitchen Stephen Kent Johnson for The Wall Street Journal
The thing that most people notice first about my kitchen is: all these hanging pots. I think hiding all your wonderful pots and pans is an expression of my mother’s generation, when a kitchen was just utilitarian; nobody had fun in there. The tools I can’t live without are: a wooden spatula and a wooden fork. Wood doesn’t scrape the bottom of your pans so much. It’s gentle. The cookbook I turn to again and again is: “Mastering the Art of French Cooking.” [Julia Child’s] wonderfully analytic way of expressing what is special about French cooking—and how to translate it to the American kitchen—was thrilling. I still go back when I’m sort of refreshing myself: “Well, what did Julia say about that?” The pot I reach for most is: the smallest size Le Creuset [enameled cast-iron] saucepan. I have it in copper, too. That’s just great for Mabon and me. It’s sometimes the pots that make you a better cook, so people should get pots that are pure and efficient and well-made. Good ones last a lifetime. At this time of year, my favorite thing to eat is: root vegetables. Growing up, most of the winter we had turnips and parsnips. I remember when the first asparagus would appear in the spring, I would just cry with delight! I think that’s rather good for your palate, to hold back for when a vegetable is really ready. I first became interested in food: when I went abroad with my husband. My awakening was clearly in France. I tell the story, in this new book, of [chef-restaurateur] Fernand Point having us in for a lunch. He didn’t know who we were; we were just scruffy Americans. But that was a great experience—a turning point, in a way, in my life. And then I had a Hungarian sister-in-law, and she introduced me to Hungarian food. She was born a countess and then she met Mr. Jones, my husband’s brother. From countess to Jones, what a tumble.
When I entertain, I like to: keep it simpler these days. When I entertained after I first came back from France, it was four courses. Always something with the drink. The main course or fish course, with a vegetable garnish—at least one—and a starch garnish. Now we’re finally up to the salad, and cheese. And, well, that’s a lot of stuff. And then dessert and coffee. Now I’d be more likely to do what I call a “made dish.” It’s all cooked and ready, and you pop it into the oven to reheat.
I don’t like it when my dinner guests: bring something. I think we’re doing too much of that. It ruins the dinner. You plan a beautifully balanced meal, and then in comes a cupcake and people feel they have to taste it and ooh and aah, and it has nothing to do with your dinner. A bottle of wine is nice and helpful, and sometimes some cheese. I like to drink: Campari. It just cleanses me somehow and gets me ready for dinner. It’s actually better, I think, than a glass of wine on an empty stomach. But once we’re into the food, I’m a good wine drinker. A typical breakfast for me is: my own granola with Vermont maple syrup. And I have some blueberries and bananas. If I’m in Paris, it’s a croissant and café au lait, with the lait, you know, warm and almost bubbling on the top. I love breakfast. And then I love lunch. On weeknights, I often cook: some wonderful pork tenderloins. Usually what I end up doing is making a roast with vegetables around. It’s so simple. And then I have some left for a quick stir-fry with vegetables the next night. Or a little hash. I love hashes: You open your fridge and you see what’s in there, so they’re always a little bit different. One of the most underrated foods is: again, root vegetables. It’s interesting to use them in different ways—not just as a separate vegetable, but, say, in a ravioli. They’re new tastes, and yet familiar. I think if you reach too hard for the new, it’s a mistake. A food trend I’m totally over is: kale. I was trying new green vegetables on my dog, Mabon. So, with all this talk that you could hardly survive without eating kale three times a day, I decided to try a little bit. I stir-fried it and put three little clumps in his dish. And he sniffed each clump, picked each one up and put it over there, and there, and there—and walked away. I was proud of him. Good boy! —Edited from an interview by Charlotte Druckman
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10 responses to “A Rare Book Indeed”

  1. Lisa Farrell says:

    What a wonderful article! Judith is an inspiration in so many ways!

  2. Betsy Donlon says:

    Love to read this about Judith…and about Mabon.
    (My Bernese Mt Dog, Henry, would love to live with Judith!)

    We have happy memories of cooking with Judith in Craftsbury after our book group read The Tenth Muse.

  3. This is wonderful, Bronwyn! I feel so lucky to know Judith, and to have met you in Vermont that magical summer.

    I’m still mourning over having to return to my cousin’s for dinner rather than eat lamb with you, Judith, and Louisette Bertholle’s grandson! Still, the tea we had remains a lovely memory.

  4. P.S.
    Bronwyn, would you forward this to Judith for us?

    Dear Judith,
    Happy birthday! We never go through Thanksgiving without Kelleher thoughts, and still remember the terrific Thanksgiving chez Jones et Jones. Wonderful memory!

    We were amused by your kale remarks. Try telling the ancient North Fork farm stands that kale is trendy, though we do remember Mary’s disdain for all those kales and chards as well.
    – Carole Bugge and Tony Moore

  5. Mary des Jardins says:

    A wonderful piece. Your mother is an amazing inspiration. In my next life I want to come back as Judith’s Mabon! Lucky dog.

  6. Polly Connell says:

    Hi Bronwyn,
    I loved the article about your stepmother and her new book. You can just tell that she has that certain special je ne sais quoi in the kitchen. How great to make it okay NOT to have your guests bring food to a dinner party!

    After reading about her favorite weeknight meal of port tenderloins, I got to thinking that I’d love to know how she prepares them. Any chance she would share with us via your website?

    Best wishes and Happy Thanksgiving,
    Polly Connell

  7. Bronwyn says:

    Let’s see what I can do, Polly. She has several variations and one involves ginger. I’m sure Judith would share the recipe!

  8. Lee says:

    Bronwyn,
    Thanks for sharing the WSJ article – great photos!
    Lee

  9. Bronwyn says:

    Lee, Glad you like it. I think it captures Judith perfectly…and her kitchen!

  10. Patrick McCormick says:

    I feel like I can hear Judith in the the room next to me as I read this. Hope all is well with everyone on the east coast! Thanks for sharing the article!
    Much Love,

    Patrick

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