A culinary online center dedicated to promoting the importance and the joy of American home cooking with an emphasis on local products and talent, celebrating the unique spirit and energy of the new food world ethos, especially in Vermont.

amuse bouche

I love quotes that add meaning to my life. Here are a few to live by:

Americans who have been to France and come home craving a reminder of their magical European experience, love Vermont cheeses.
—Allison Hooper, founder, VT Butter & Cheese Creamery

Practice not cleaning your plate: it will help you eat less in short term and develop self-control in the long term.
—Michael Pollan

Sweet taste buds develop before all others, that’s why small children love sweets.
—Bronwyn Dunne

Don’t eat breakfast cereals that change the color of milk.
—Michael Pollan

My rule of thumb is, when in doubt, cook more than you think you may need.
—Marian Cunningham, from Learning to Cook


Food Entrepreneurship in Vermont Part II: Bijou Fine Chocolates

11800786_10206168382801957_794684401_o

[Left to Right] Rowan, Kevin, Virginia, & Laura in their shop in the Vermont Artisan Village

The seasonal Swiss pastries, beautifully decorated truffles, fresh flowers, bright chiyogami paper displayed on the walls, and pops of color throughout Bijou’s sophisticated shop sets it apart from any other chocolate shop in Vermont. Upon walking into the chic, modern space customers are immediately transported to a trendy Swiss patisserie. Not only do the kind-hearted owners, Kevin, Laura, & their son, Rowan Toohey sell decadent chocolates, but also serve Harney & Sons teas to brighten anyone’s day. Learn more about the story behind Bijou and the passionate owners of this family business working to revive European chocolate traditions in the article below.

11780304_10206168373641728_168567953_o

Bijou’s Mission: Liberating Chocolate
Chocolate in America has not been given the respect it deserves. In the United States, the antioxidant-rich bean is blamed for weight gain to acne to bad cholesterol—and for good reason too–due to the way Americans manufacture it. In the United States, much of our chocolate is filled with sugar and chemical emulsifiers, such as PGPR, which is made from castor beans. Due to this processing, many Americans have only tasted a sugary version of true chocolate. Kevin and Laura Toohey, of Bijou Fine Chocolate, are working to change that. Their goal is to “liberate chocolate” using traditional European techniques to allow customers to experience the varied flavors of single-origin chocolate through their truffles at their shop, Bijou Fine Chocolate in Shelburne.

11783593_10206168378921860_1207924611_o

Gifts Handed Down
Kevin and Laura, who each have musical backgrounds, started off by working at a Swiss pastry shop, André’s in St. Louis in the late 70s. This led to Kevin’s three year-long apprenticeship with Swiss chef, René Nussbaum. The apprenticeship involved learning how to make bread to all the steps of pastry making to the art of making great truffles. This apprenticeship mirrored the teacher/student relationship in the music world. The teachings were gifts handed down from many early generations, and the traditional recipes from Kevin’s time learning from Swiss Pastry chefs are still the recipes they use today.

Quality Over Quantity
After being inspired by an ad in a Buddhist magazine, the couple and their five children decided to leave St. Louis and head to Hardwick, Vermont. In Hardwick, the couple started Luna Chocolates. When their success in the chocolate business made them too large and corporate, they decided to sell the operation and start a smaller, more intimate operation. They called it Bijou because they feel that each confection they make is jewel-like. Today you can find Kevin and Laura, and their son Rowan running their distinctively designed chocolate, pastry & tea shop located in the Vermont Artisan Village in Shelburne.

11724793_10206168415082764_528889511_o

Vast & Varied Flavors
In the United States, many food businesses strive for growth–often at the cost of quality. The Toohey’s, on the other hand would rather stay small and personal. They prefer the European standard where the people, staff and customers included, are what really matter. The Toohey’s are excited to share their love of chocolate with others. For many, Bijou is often a “first time experience” in the real chocolate world—a chance to experience the vast and varied flavors in, for instance, a Columbian chocolate compared to a Venezuelan one. Just as there is terroir in the world of wine, the flavor of chocolate can vary tremendously depending on where it comes from.

Three Veils of Chocolate Awareness
Kevin describes the chocolate world as having three veils. The first is simply being aware that the substance is chocolate; the second is being able to distinguish between milk, dark, & white chocolate. The third veil, however, is the world of the chocolate conjurors, the magicians of the inner chocolate world. This veil of awareness is what normally separates chocolatiers form the rest of the world; however, Kevin sees his job as “guiding people through this veil”.

11801108_10206168418482849_182460893_o

The Art of Truffle Making
Although Bijou sells a variety of chocolate goodies, from rum cake to chocolate dusted almonds, a truffle is Kevin’s favorite way to consume chocolate. “Truffles are the perfect consistency for chocolate. They’re the happy medium between a warm bowl of melted chocolate and a chocolate bar,” he says. However, the art of truffle making is no easy task. “Chocolate is one of the most complex foods to work with. It is more aligned to glass than food. Like glass, it is always headed somewhere,” Kevin explained. The Toohey’s job is to temper the chocolate by melting its crystalline structure to make it workable. By working with very specific temperatures and low humidity for specific amounts of time, the perfect emulsification can be achieved and thus, the perfect texture. The result? A perfect thin robing, that snaps when you bite into it, engulfing a creamy ganache made with Kimball Brook Farm cream. Once this tiny, living chocolate organism has been created, it has seven days before it starts losing its freshness—the Toohey’s most important, and deceptively difficult, ingredient. To keep these micro biomes “alive”, the Toohey’s must ensure that their shop stays at a constant temperature of 64 degrees and relative humidity below 50%.

11774345_10206168373681729_1851012204_n-1

The Nuance of Flavor
Kevin recounts that he has watched many first timers exclaim that they never knew chocolate could taste like this. The Tooheys explained that many people have almost a religious experience trying their chocolate for the first time. “The great thing about Vermont is that many people’s palates are already trained to pick up on the nuances of flavors. If you go to a farmers’ market, there will be several types of blueberries, and many individuals can easily tell the difference between the different varieties.” Kevin also explains that the growth of the craft beer, coffee and cheese in Vermont, has made it a perfect location for craft chocolate to grow as well. Kevin’s own chocolate palate is so sophisticated that his favorite chocolate actually drastically changes depending on the day and his body chemistry.

Screen Shot 2015-07-26 at 10.49.55 AM

A Lifestyle
However, the Toohey’s don’t just want this chocolate to be a luxury, they want it to be a lifestyle. They have poured their hearts and souls into making each and every truffle, and see their creations as ways to show your appreciation and love for others. So, if you want to expand your chocolate palate, or simply want to try some of Vermont’s finest truffles, pastries, and other chocolate goodies, head over to the Toohey’s bright, beautifully decorated shop today!

Bijou Fine ChocolateBIJOUfinalDOT-03-300x276
Open Daily: 10 AM – 6 PM
6221 Shelburne Rd. #200
Shelburne, Vermont 05482
802-540-5343
info@studiocacaovt.com

Natalie Lovelace
Photographs Courtesy of Rachael DeWitt, UVM Senior

Posted: 7-26-2015

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      string(9694) "[caption id="attachment_3840" align="aligncenter" width="525"]11800786_10206168382801957_794684401_o [Left to Right] Rowan, Kevin, Virginia, & Laura in their shop in the Vermont Artisan Village[/caption]The seasonal Swiss pastries, beautifully decorated truffles, fresh flowers, bright chiyogami paper displayed on the walls, and pops of color throughout Bijou’s sophisticated shop sets it apart from any other chocolate shop in Vermont. Upon walking into the chic, modern space customers are immediately transported to a trendy Swiss patisserie. Not only do the kind-hearted owners, Kevin, Laura, & their son, Rowan Toohey sell decadent chocolates, but also serve Harney & Sons teas to brighten anyone’s day. Learn more about the story behind Bijou and the passionate owners of this family business working to revive European chocolate traditions in the article below.

11780304_10206168373641728_168567953_o

Bijou’s Mission: Liberating Chocolate
Chocolate in America has not been given the respect it deserves. In the United States, the antioxidant-rich bean is blamed for weight gain to acne to bad cholesterol—and for good reason too--due to the way Americans manufacture it. In the United States, much of our chocolate is filled with sugar and chemical emulsifiers, such as PGPR, which is made from castor beans. Due to this processing, many Americans have only tasted a sugary version of true chocolate. Kevin and Laura Toohey, of Bijou Fine Chocolate, are working to change that. Their goal is to “liberate chocolate” using traditional European techniques to allow customers to experience the varied flavors of single-origin chocolate through their truffles at their shop, Bijou Fine Chocolate in Shelburne.

11783593_10206168378921860_1207924611_o

Gifts Handed Down
Kevin and Laura, who each have musical backgrounds, started off by working at a Swiss pastry shop, André’s in St. Louis in the late 70s. This led to Kevin’s three year-long apprenticeship with Swiss chef, René Nussbaum. The apprenticeship involved learning how to make bread to all the steps of pastry making to the art of making great truffles. This apprenticeship mirrored the teacher/student relationship in the music world. The teachings were gifts handed down from many early generations, and the traditional recipes from Kevin’s time learning from Swiss Pastry chefs are still the recipes they use today.

Quality Over Quantity
After being inspired by an ad in a Buddhist magazine, the couple and their five children decided to leave St. Louis and head to Hardwick, Vermont. In Hardwick, the couple started Luna Chocolates. When their success in the chocolate business made them too large and corporate, they decided to sell the operation and start a smaller, more intimate operation. They called it Bijou because they feel that each confection they make is jewel-like. Today you can find Kevin and Laura, and their son Rowan running their distinctively designed chocolate, pastry & tea shop located in the Vermont Artisan Village in Shelburne.

11724793_10206168415082764_528889511_o

Vast & Varied Flavors
In the United States, many food businesses strive for growth--often at the cost of quality. The Toohey’s, on the other hand would rather stay small and personal. They prefer the European standard where the people, staff and customers included, are what really matter. The Toohey’s are excited to share their love of chocolate with others. For many, Bijou is often a “first time experience” in the real chocolate world—a chance to experience the vast and varied flavors in, for instance, a Columbian chocolate compared to a Venezuelan one. Just as there is terroir in the world of wine, the flavor of chocolate can vary tremendously depending on where it comes from.

Three Veils of Chocolate Awareness
Kevin describes the chocolate world as having three veils. The first is simply being aware that the substance is chocolate; the second is being able to distinguish between milk, dark, & white chocolate. The third veil, however, is the world of the chocolate conjurors, the magicians of the inner chocolate world. This veil of awareness is what normally separates chocolatiers form the rest of the world; however, Kevin sees his job as “guiding people through this veil”.

11801108_10206168418482849_182460893_o

The Art of Truffle Making
Although Bijou sells a variety of chocolate goodies, from rum cake to chocolate dusted almonds, a truffle is Kevin’s favorite way to consume chocolate. “Truffles are the perfect consistency for chocolate. They’re the happy medium between a warm bowl of melted chocolate and a chocolate bar,” he says. However, the art of truffle making is no easy task. “Chocolate is one of the most complex foods to work with. It is more aligned to glass than food. Like glass, it is always headed somewhere,” Kevin explained. The Toohey’s job is to temper the chocolate by melting its crystalline structure to make it workable. By working with very specific temperatures and low humidity for specific amounts of time, the perfect emulsification can be achieved and thus, the perfect texture. The result? A perfect thin robing, that snaps when you bite into it, engulfing a creamy ganache made with Kimball Brook Farm cream. Once this tiny, living chocolate organism has been created, it has seven days before it starts losing its freshness—the Toohey’s most important, and deceptively difficult, ingredient. To keep these micro biomes “alive”, the Toohey’s must ensure that their shop stays at a constant temperature of 64 degrees and relative humidity below 50%.

11774345_10206168373681729_1851012204_n-1

The Nuance of Flavor
Kevin recounts that he has watched many first timers exclaim that they never knew chocolate could taste like this. The Tooheys explained that many people have almost a religious experience trying their chocolate for the first time. “The great thing about Vermont is that many people’s palates are already trained to pick up on the nuances of flavors. If you go to a farmers’ market, there will be several types of blueberries, and many individuals can easily tell the difference between the different varieties.” Kevin also explains that the growth of the craft beer, coffee and cheese in Vermont, has made it a perfect location for craft chocolate to grow as well. Kevin’s own chocolate palate is so sophisticated that his favorite chocolate actually drastically changes depending on the day and his body chemistry.

Screen Shot 2015-07-26 at 10.49.55 AM

A Lifestyle
However, the Toohey’s don’t just want this chocolate to be a luxury, they want it to be a lifestyle. They have poured their hearts and souls into making each and every truffle, and see their creations as ways to show your appreciation and love for others. So, if you want to expand your chocolate palate, or simply want to try some of Vermont’s finest truffles, pastries, and other chocolate goodies, head over to the Toohey’s bright, beautifully decorated shop today!

Bijou Fine ChocolateBIJOUfinalDOT-03-300x276
Open Daily: 10 AM - 6 PM
6221 Shelburne Rd. #200
Shelburne, Vermont 05482
802-540-5343
info@studiocacaovt.com
Natalie Lovelace Photographs Courtesy of Rachael DeWitt, UVM Senior
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Upon walking into the chic, modern space customers are immediately transported to a trendy Swiss patisserie. Not only do the kind-hearted owners, Kevin, Laura, & their son, Rowan Toohey sell decadent chocolates, but also serve Harney & Sons teas to brighten anyone’s day. Learn more about the story behind Bijou and the passionate owners of this family business working to revive European chocolate traditions in the article below. 11780304_10206168373641728_168567953_o Bijou’s Mission: Liberating Chocolate Chocolate in America has not been given the respect it deserves. In the United States, the antioxidant-rich bean is blamed for weight gain to acne to bad cholesterol—and for good reason too--due to the way Americans manufacture it. In the United States, much of our chocolate is filled with sugar and chemical emulsifiers, such as PGPR, which is made from castor beans. Due to this processing, many Americans have only tasted a sugary version of true chocolate. Kevin and Laura Toohey, of Bijou Fine Chocolate, are working to change that. Their goal is to “liberate chocolate” using traditional European techniques to allow customers to experience the varied flavors of single-origin chocolate through their truffles at their shop, Bijou Fine Chocolate in Shelburne. 11783593_10206168378921860_1207924611_o Gifts Handed Down Kevin and Laura, who each have musical backgrounds, started off by working at a Swiss pastry shop, André’s in St. Louis in the late 70s. This led to Kevin’s three year-long apprenticeship with Swiss chef, René Nussbaum. The apprenticeship involved learning how to make bread to all the steps of pastry making to the art of making great truffles. This apprenticeship mirrored the teacher/student relationship in the music world. The teachings were gifts handed down from many early generations, and the traditional recipes from Kevin’s time learning from Swiss Pastry chefs are still the recipes they use today. Quality Over Quantity After being inspired by an ad in a Buddhist magazine, the couple and their five children decided to leave St. Louis and head to Hardwick, Vermont. In Hardwick, the couple started Luna Chocolates. When their success in the chocolate business made them too large and corporate, they decided to sell the operation and start a smaller, more intimate operation. They called it Bijou because they feel that each confection they make is jewel-like. Today you can find Kevin and Laura, and their son Rowan running their distinctively designed chocolate, pastry & tea shop located in the Vermont Artisan Village in Shelburne. 11724793_10206168415082764_528889511_o Vast & Varied Flavors In the United States, many food businesses strive for growth--often at the cost of quality. The Toohey’s, on the other hand would rather stay small and personal. They prefer the European standard where the people, staff and customers included, are what really matter. The Toohey’s are excited to share their love of chocolate with others. For many, Bijou is often a “first time experience” in the real chocolate world—a chance to experience the vast and varied flavors in, for instance, a Columbian chocolate compared to a Venezuelan one. Just as there is terroir in the world of wine, the flavor of chocolate can vary tremendously depending on where it comes from. Three Veils of Chocolate Awareness Kevin describes the chocolate world as having three veils. The first is simply being aware that the substance is chocolate; the second is being able to distinguish between milk, dark, & white chocolate. The third veil, however, is the world of the chocolate conjurors, the magicians of the inner chocolate world. This veil of awareness is what normally separates chocolatiers form the rest of the world; however, Kevin sees his job as “guiding people through this veil”. 11801108_10206168418482849_182460893_o The Art of Truffle Making Although Bijou sells a variety of chocolate goodies, from rum cake to chocolate dusted almonds, a truffle is Kevin’s favorite way to consume chocolate. “Truffles are the perfect consistency for chocolate. They’re the happy medium between a warm bowl of melted chocolate and a chocolate bar,” he says. However, the art of truffle making is no easy task. “Chocolate is one of the most complex foods to work with. It is more aligned to glass than food. Like glass, it is always headed somewhere,” Kevin explained. The Toohey’s job is to temper the chocolate by melting its crystalline structure to make it workable. By working with very specific temperatures and low humidity for specific amounts of time, the perfect emulsification can be achieved and thus, the perfect texture. The result? A perfect thin robing, that snaps when you bite into it, engulfing a creamy ganache made with Kimball Brook Farm cream. Once this tiny, living chocolate organism has been created, it has seven days before it starts losing its freshness—the Toohey’s most important, and deceptively difficult, ingredient. To keep these micro biomes “alive”, the Toohey’s must ensure that their shop stays at a constant temperature of 64 degrees and relative humidity below 50%. 11774345_10206168373681729_1851012204_n-1 The Nuance of Flavor Kevin recounts that he has watched many first timers exclaim that they never knew chocolate could taste like this. The Tooheys explained that many people have almost a religious experience trying their chocolate for the first time. “The great thing about Vermont is that many people’s palates are already trained to pick up on the nuances of flavors. If you go to a farmers’ market, there will be several types of blueberries, and many individuals can easily tell the difference between the different varieties.” Kevin also explains that the growth of the craft beer, coffee and cheese in Vermont, has made it a perfect location for craft chocolate to grow as well. Kevin’s own chocolate palate is so sophisticated that his favorite chocolate actually drastically changes depending on the day and his body chemistry. Screen Shot 2015-07-26 at 10.49.55 AM A Lifestyle However, the Toohey’s don’t just want this chocolate to be a luxury, they want it to be a lifestyle. They have poured their hearts and souls into making each and every truffle, and see their creations as ways to show your appreciation and love for others. So, if you want to expand your chocolate palate, or simply want to try some of Vermont’s finest truffles, pastries, and other chocolate goodies, head over to the Toohey’s bright, beautifully decorated shop today! Bijou Fine ChocolateBIJOUfinalDOT-03-300x276 Open Daily: 10 AM - 6 PM 6221 Shelburne Rd. #200 Shelburne, Vermont 05482 802-540-5343 info@studiocacaovt.com
Natalie Lovelace Photographs Courtesy of Rachael DeWitt, UVM Senior
" ["post_title"]=> string(63) "Food Entrepreneurship in Vermont Part II: Bijou Fine Chocolates" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(153) "Learn more about the story behind Bijou Fine Chocolate and the passionate owners of this family business working to revive European chocolate traditions." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(63) "bijou-fine-chocolates-european-style-chocolate-comes-to-vermont" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-07-31 16:32:13" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-07-31 16:32:13" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=3839" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "2" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["queried_object"]=> object(WP_Post)#370 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(3839) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2015-07-26 14:52:06" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-07-26 14:52:06" ["post_content"]=> string(9694) "[caption id="attachment_3840" align="aligncenter" width="525"]11800786_10206168382801957_794684401_o [Left to Right] Rowan, Kevin, Virginia, & Laura in their shop in the Vermont Artisan Village[/caption]The seasonal Swiss pastries, beautifully decorated truffles, fresh flowers, bright chiyogami paper displayed on the walls, and pops of color throughout Bijou’s sophisticated shop sets it apart from any other chocolate shop in Vermont. Upon walking into the chic, modern space customers are immediately transported to a trendy Swiss patisserie. Not only do the kind-hearted owners, Kevin, Laura, & their son, Rowan Toohey sell decadent chocolates, but also serve Harney & Sons teas to brighten anyone’s day. Learn more about the story behind Bijou and the passionate owners of this family business working to revive European chocolate traditions in the article below. 11780304_10206168373641728_168567953_o Bijou’s Mission: Liberating Chocolate Chocolate in America has not been given the respect it deserves. In the United States, the antioxidant-rich bean is blamed for weight gain to acne to bad cholesterol—and for good reason too--due to the way Americans manufacture it. In the United States, much of our chocolate is filled with sugar and chemical emulsifiers, such as PGPR, which is made from castor beans. Due to this processing, many Americans have only tasted a sugary version of true chocolate. Kevin and Laura Toohey, of Bijou Fine Chocolate, are working to change that. Their goal is to “liberate chocolate” using traditional European techniques to allow customers to experience the varied flavors of single-origin chocolate through their truffles at their shop, Bijou Fine Chocolate in Shelburne. 11783593_10206168378921860_1207924611_o Gifts Handed Down Kevin and Laura, who each have musical backgrounds, started off by working at a Swiss pastry shop, André’s in St. Louis in the late 70s. This led to Kevin’s three year-long apprenticeship with Swiss chef, René Nussbaum. The apprenticeship involved learning how to make bread to all the steps of pastry making to the art of making great truffles. This apprenticeship mirrored the teacher/student relationship in the music world. The teachings were gifts handed down from many early generations, and the traditional recipes from Kevin’s time learning from Swiss Pastry chefs are still the recipes they use today. Quality Over Quantity After being inspired by an ad in a Buddhist magazine, the couple and their five children decided to leave St. Louis and head to Hardwick, Vermont. In Hardwick, the couple started Luna Chocolates. When their success in the chocolate business made them too large and corporate, they decided to sell the operation and start a smaller, more intimate operation. They called it Bijou because they feel that each confection they make is jewel-like. Today you can find Kevin and Laura, and their son Rowan running their distinctively designed chocolate, pastry & tea shop located in the Vermont Artisan Village in Shelburne. 11724793_10206168415082764_528889511_o Vast & Varied Flavors In the United States, many food businesses strive for growth--often at the cost of quality. The Toohey’s, on the other hand would rather stay small and personal. They prefer the European standard where the people, staff and customers included, are what really matter. The Toohey’s are excited to share their love of chocolate with others. For many, Bijou is often a “first time experience” in the real chocolate world—a chance to experience the vast and varied flavors in, for instance, a Columbian chocolate compared to a Venezuelan one. Just as there is terroir in the world of wine, the flavor of chocolate can vary tremendously depending on where it comes from. Three Veils of Chocolate Awareness Kevin describes the chocolate world as having three veils. The first is simply being aware that the substance is chocolate; the second is being able to distinguish between milk, dark, & white chocolate. The third veil, however, is the world of the chocolate conjurors, the magicians of the inner chocolate world. This veil of awareness is what normally separates chocolatiers form the rest of the world; however, Kevin sees his job as “guiding people through this veil”. 11801108_10206168418482849_182460893_o The Art of Truffle Making Although Bijou sells a variety of chocolate goodies, from rum cake to chocolate dusted almonds, a truffle is Kevin’s favorite way to consume chocolate. “Truffles are the perfect consistency for chocolate. They’re the happy medium between a warm bowl of melted chocolate and a chocolate bar,” he says. However, the art of truffle making is no easy task. “Chocolate is one of the most complex foods to work with. It is more aligned to glass than food. Like glass, it is always headed somewhere,” Kevin explained. The Toohey’s job is to temper the chocolate by melting its crystalline structure to make it workable. By working with very specific temperatures and low humidity for specific amounts of time, the perfect emulsification can be achieved and thus, the perfect texture. The result? A perfect thin robing, that snaps when you bite into it, engulfing a creamy ganache made with Kimball Brook Farm cream. Once this tiny, living chocolate organism has been created, it has seven days before it starts losing its freshness—the Toohey’s most important, and deceptively difficult, ingredient. To keep these micro biomes “alive”, the Toohey’s must ensure that their shop stays at a constant temperature of 64 degrees and relative humidity below 50%. 11774345_10206168373681729_1851012204_n-1 The Nuance of Flavor Kevin recounts that he has watched many first timers exclaim that they never knew chocolate could taste like this. The Tooheys explained that many people have almost a religious experience trying their chocolate for the first time. “The great thing about Vermont is that many people’s palates are already trained to pick up on the nuances of flavors. If you go to a farmers’ market, there will be several types of blueberries, and many individuals can easily tell the difference between the different varieties.” Kevin also explains that the growth of the craft beer, coffee and cheese in Vermont, has made it a perfect location for craft chocolate to grow as well. Kevin’s own chocolate palate is so sophisticated that his favorite chocolate actually drastically changes depending on the day and his body chemistry. Screen Shot 2015-07-26 at 10.49.55 AM A Lifestyle However, the Toohey’s don’t just want this chocolate to be a luxury, they want it to be a lifestyle. They have poured their hearts and souls into making each and every truffle, and see their creations as ways to show your appreciation and love for others. So, if you want to expand your chocolate palate, or simply want to try some of Vermont’s finest truffles, pastries, and other chocolate goodies, head over to the Toohey’s bright, beautifully decorated shop today! Bijou Fine ChocolateBIJOUfinalDOT-03-300x276 Open Daily: 10 AM - 6 PM 6221 Shelburne Rd. #200 Shelburne, Vermont 05482 802-540-5343 info@studiocacaovt.com
Natalie Lovelace Photographs Courtesy of Rachael DeWitt, UVM Senior
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2 responses to “Food Entrepreneurship in Vermont Part II: Bijou Fine Chocolates”

  1. Niki Glanz says:

    Greetings, Bronwyn,
    It’s been several yrs since we’ve been in touch, so a very belated CONGRATS on your great blog/website! Very impressive & very helpful. Am planning to take advantage of one of your listed tours this week, so thanks in advance for that, as well.

    We met via One World Library discussions at Shelburne Museum’s Brick House (I’m the tall participant, in case that helps). I’d love to reconnect at some point, whenever you’re in Middlebury area, or perhaps I can travel to your locale at some point. Must admit I’m very much focused on my work due to “losing” a year plus due to health issues (3 major surgeries & recoveries related to skiing accident some 8 yrs ago). Very fortunate in being able to walk & move again basically pain-free. Plus new inspiration for my book occurred while hospitalized, if you can believe it! Before that I was out-of-state doing research at various points, so regrettably wasn’t active locally (other than Middlebury, proper) to any real extent.

    Trust all continuing well for you. I enjoyed seeing the WSJ write-up of Judith’s kitchen and am hoping she and your father are fine, too. Drop me a note when you have a chance and enjoy this beautiful summer we’re having!
    All the best,
    Niki

    • Bronwyn says:

      So nice to hear from you, Niki. Thank you you for your kind words about the website. I have a terrific, UVM Senior, Natalie Lovelace, helping me and she has been doing a great job! The Bijou Chocolate post is entirely her story. So glad you like it. Sorry to hear about your health problems but glad that all is going well now. When you are planning a trip in this direction, please let me know….

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