A culinary online center dedicated to promoting the importance and the joy of American home cooking with an emphasis on local products and talent, celebrating the unique spirit and energy of the new food world ethos, especially in Vermont.

amuse bouche

I love quotes that add meaning to my life. Here are a few to live by:

How should I eat? (Not too much)
—Michael Pollan

If it is so difficult to learn to cook, how did all those early pioneer women manage to cross the country in rugged covered wagons and feed troops of people from one big pot hung over an open fire?
—Marion Cunningham, from Learning to Cook

Treat treats as treats.
—Michael Pollan

No matter how you slice it through, grain-fed meat production systems are a drain on the global food supply.
—Jonathan A. Foley, director of the Institute on the Environment, U of MN

Cooking with Evan Jones: My Father’s Recipes, Part 4 of 4

 

Cooking Inspiration

When I think about my father and his love of food, I think about how his life changed when he was a very young man. It was World War II, a cataclysmic event that swept many young men and women away from their American roots and into a way of life they were not prepared for, Europe, a place of new tastes, as well as other new cultural experiences.

My father’s path turned out to be one that led him first, to England, then Germany and finally Paris, where the flavor, style and taste of French food encouraged him to stay; then back to the United States, having married the woman who would soon make Julia Child famous. My stepmother, Judith Jones, became, for him, the culinary, as well as life partner he’d dreamt of in his days, so many years earlier, on the banks of the St. Croix River in Minnesota.

His Book, American Food; The Gastronomic Story

The recipes he culled and created from the bounty that was America’s contribution to world cuisine, would eventually reside in a seminal book, American Food; The Gastronomic Story, deemed by many to be the first true look at American Food as a culinary hallmark of its own. The book’s publication in 1975 would initiate a revolution of food thought making our country’s young food history a place of interest to culinary novitiates, experts and go-getters, alike. See New York Times article, Preparation of Food in America: A Decade of Change  (Jan 6, 1982).

For me, those recipes were the fun and flavor of my childhood, my memories as indelible and as rich as anything in my life. Both consciously and unconsciously, the recipes we cooked together, as well as the improvisations that inspired confidence in me as a cook, have been the thread that runs through my life whatever I’ve been doing and wherever I go.

When I Was A Young Cook Living in England

When I moved to England as a young bride in the early 1960s, I brought Julia Child’s, Mastering The Art of French Cooking with me. Along with practicing and “mastering” the way to make Coq au Vin and Boeuf Bourguignon, I was also remembering the way my father’s meatloaf always came out of the oven tender and full of flavor, how his fried chicken with lime had a delicate Asian flavor but still remained distinctly American, and that good old American apple pie was one of the best desserts in the world.

Cooking is always what I do when things get tough. It was a link to home when I lived in England.  Many years later, when I spent months in the surprisingly different world of post-Cold War Armenia, I found my center and solace in cooking. It has been a link to whatever new world I find myself in, always inspiration as I discover foreign produce markets, find myself a guest at strange dinner tables, or as a connection to new friendships.

Away from home, I love learning from home cooks. In England, I was shamed into making my own applesauce by the local greengrocer, a middle-aged, slightly plump neighbor who ran the small grocery shop at the end of our cul-de-sac. When I arrived one morning, my goal to buy applesauce as an accompaniment to a pork roast planned for that night’s dinner, she sent me home to our rental cottage, with explicit directions to pick the apples on the trees behind our house, peel, core, chop them and cook them down into sauce. “Why would you buy applesauce, when you have those nice apples?”, she questioned me sternly. My father would have agreed.

A Love of Good Food

His memory, his love of good food, and the intensely rich times my family experienced in the kitchen and around the dinner table is the inspiration for, In The Kitchen With Bronwyn, a special place where the adventures I have today are as much about listening to your thoughts on food, learning from your experiences, as well as sharing my life and my love of good food. Because every moment in the kitchen, putting together a simple meal for your family or creating a celebration dinner for a dozen good friends, is a wonderful event. Each cooking opportunity is a time to stop and connect with your inner tenth muse, Gastera, as my father did so many years ago in Paris.

A Bientot!

 

 

Posted: 8-27-2012

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Cooking Inspiration

When I think about my father and his love of food, I think about how his life changed when he was a very young man. It was World War II, a cataclysmic event that swept many young men and women away from their American roots and into a way of life they were not prepared for, Europe, a place of new tastes, as well as other new cultural experiences.

My father’s path turned out to be one that led him first, to England, then Germany and finally Paris, where the flavor, style and taste of French food encouraged him to stay; then back to the United States, having married the woman who would soon make Julia Child famous. My stepmother, Judith Jones, became, for him, the culinary, as well as life partner he’d dreamt of in his days, so many years earlier, on the banks of the St. Croix River in Minnesota.

His Book, American Food; The Gastronomic Story

The recipes he culled and created from the bounty that was America’s contribution to world cuisine, would eventually reside in a seminal book, American Food; The Gastronomic Story, deemed by many to be the first true look at American Food as a culinary hallmark of its own. The book’s publication in 1975 would initiate a revolution of food thought making our country’s young food history a place of interest to culinary novitiates, experts and go-getters, alike. See New York Times article, Preparation of Food in America: A Decade of Change  (Jan 6, 1982).

For me, those recipes were the fun and flavor of my childhood, my memories as indelible and as rich as anything in my life. Both consciously and unconsciously, the recipes we cooked together, as well as the improvisations that inspired confidence in me as a cook, have been the thread that runs through my life whatever I’ve been doing and wherever I go.

When I Was A Young Cook Living in England

When I moved to England as a young bride in the early 1960s, I brought Julia Child’s, Mastering The Art of French Cooking with me. Along with practicing and “mastering” the way to make Coq au Vin and Boeuf Bourguignon, I was also remembering the way my father’s meatloaf always came out of the oven tender and full of flavor, how his fried chicken with lime had a delicate Asian flavor but still remained distinctly American, and that good old American apple pie was one of the best desserts in the world.

Cooking is always what I do when things get tough. It was a link to home when I lived in England.  Many years later, when I spent months in the surprisingly different world of post-Cold War Armenia, I found my center and solace in cooking. It has been a link to whatever new world I find myself in, always inspiration as I discover foreign produce markets, find myself a guest at strange dinner tables, or as a connection to new friendships.

Away from home, I love learning from home cooks. In England, I was shamed into making my own applesauce by the local greengrocer, a middle-aged, slightly plump neighbor who ran the small grocery shop at the end of our cul-de-sac. When I arrived one morning, my goal to buy applesauce as an accompaniment to a pork roast planned for that night’s dinner, she sent me home to our rental cottage, with explicit directions to pick the apples on the trees behind our house, peel, core, chop them and cook them down into sauce. “Why would you buy applesauce, when you have those nice apples?”, she questioned me sternly. My father would have agreed.

A Love of Good Food

His memory, his love of good food, and the intensely rich times my family experienced in the kitchen and around the dinner table is the inspiration for, In The Kitchen With Bronwyn, a special place where the adventures I have today are as much about listening to your thoughts on food, learning from your experiences, as well as sharing my life and my love of good food. Because every moment in the kitchen, putting together a simple meal for your family or creating a celebration dinner for a dozen good friends, is a wonderful event. Each cooking opportunity is a time to stop and connect with your inner tenth muse, Gastera, as my father did so many years ago in Paris.

A Bientot!

 

 

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Cooking Inspiration

When I think about my father and his love of food, I think about how his life changed when he was a very young man. It was World War II, a cataclysmic event that swept many young men and women away from their American roots and into a way of life they were not prepared for, Europe, a place of new tastes, as well as other new cultural experiences.

My father’s path turned out to be one that led him first, to England, then Germany and finally Paris, where the flavor, style and taste of French food encouraged him to stay; then back to the United States, having married the woman who would soon make Julia Child famous. My stepmother, Judith Jones, became, for him, the culinary, as well as life partner he’d dreamt of in his days, so many years earlier, on the banks of the St. Croix River in Minnesota.

His Book, American Food; The Gastronomic Story

The recipes he culled and created from the bounty that was America’s contribution to world cuisine, would eventually reside in a seminal book, American Food; The Gastronomic Story, deemed by many to be the first true look at American Food as a culinary hallmark of its own. The book’s publication in 1975 would initiate a revolution of food thought making our country’s young food history a place of interest to culinary novitiates, experts and go-getters, alike. See New York Times article, Preparation of Food in America: A Decade of Change  (Jan 6, 1982).

For me, those recipes were the fun and flavor of my childhood, my memories as indelible and as rich as anything in my life. Both consciously and unconsciously, the recipes we cooked together, as well as the improvisations that inspired confidence in me as a cook, have been the thread that runs through my life whatever I’ve been doing and wherever I go.

When I Was A Young Cook Living in England

When I moved to England as a young bride in the early 1960s, I brought Julia Child’s, Mastering The Art of French Cooking with me. Along with practicing and “mastering” the way to make Coq au Vin and Boeuf Bourguignon, I was also remembering the way my father’s meatloaf always came out of the oven tender and full of flavor, how his fried chicken with lime had a delicate Asian flavor but still remained distinctly American, and that good old American apple pie was one of the best desserts in the world.

Cooking is always what I do when things get tough. It was a link to home when I lived in England.  Many years later, when I spent months in the surprisingly different world of post-Cold War Armenia, I found my center and solace in cooking. It has been a link to whatever new world I find myself in, always inspiration as I discover foreign produce markets, find myself a guest at strange dinner tables, or as a connection to new friendships.

Away from home, I love learning from home cooks. In England, I was shamed into making my own applesauce by the local greengrocer, a middle-aged, slightly plump neighbor who ran the small grocery shop at the end of our cul-de-sac. When I arrived one morning, my goal to buy applesauce as an accompaniment to a pork roast planned for that night’s dinner, she sent me home to our rental cottage, with explicit directions to pick the apples on the trees behind our house, peel, core, chop them and cook them down into sauce. “Why would you buy applesauce, when you have those nice apples?”, she questioned me sternly. My father would have agreed.

A Love of Good Food

His memory, his love of good food, and the intensely rich times my family experienced in the kitchen and around the dinner table is the inspiration for, In The Kitchen With Bronwyn, a special place where the adventures I have today are as much about listening to your thoughts on food, learning from your experiences, as well as sharing my life and my love of good food. Because every moment in the kitchen, putting together a simple meal for your family or creating a celebration dinner for a dozen good friends, is a wonderful event. Each cooking opportunity is a time to stop and connect with your inner tenth muse, Gastera, as my father did so many years ago in Paris.

A Bientot!

 

 

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Cooking Inspiration

When I think about my father and his love of food, I think about how his life changed when he was a very young man. It was World War II, a cataclysmic event that swept many young men and women away from their American roots and into a way of life they were not prepared for, Europe, a place of new tastes, as well as other new cultural experiences.

My father’s path turned out to be one that led him first, to England, then Germany and finally Paris, where the flavor, style and taste of French food encouraged him to stay; then back to the United States, having married the woman who would soon make Julia Child famous. My stepmother, Judith Jones, became, for him, the culinary, as well as life partner he’d dreamt of in his days, so many years earlier, on the banks of the St. Croix River in Minnesota.

His Book, American Food; The Gastronomic Story

The recipes he culled and created from the bounty that was America’s contribution to world cuisine, would eventually reside in a seminal book, American Food; The Gastronomic Story, deemed by many to be the first true look at American Food as a culinary hallmark of its own. The book’s publication in 1975 would initiate a revolution of food thought making our country’s young food history a place of interest to culinary novitiates, experts and go-getters, alike. See New York Times article, Preparation of Food in America: A Decade of Change  (Jan 6, 1982).

For me, those recipes were the fun and flavor of my childhood, my memories as indelible and as rich as anything in my life. Both consciously and unconsciously, the recipes we cooked together, as well as the improvisations that inspired confidence in me as a cook, have been the thread that runs through my life whatever I’ve been doing and wherever I go.

When I Was A Young Cook Living in England

When I moved to England as a young bride in the early 1960s, I brought Julia Child’s, Mastering The Art of French Cooking with me. Along with practicing and “mastering” the way to make Coq au Vin and Boeuf Bourguignon, I was also remembering the way my father’s meatloaf always came out of the oven tender and full of flavor, how his fried chicken with lime had a delicate Asian flavor but still remained distinctly American, and that good old American apple pie was one of the best desserts in the world.

Cooking is always what I do when things get tough. It was a link to home when I lived in England.  Many years later, when I spent months in the surprisingly different world of post-Cold War Armenia, I found my center and solace in cooking. It has been a link to whatever new world I find myself in, always inspiration as I discover foreign produce markets, find myself a guest at strange dinner tables, or as a connection to new friendships.

Away from home, I love learning from home cooks. In England, I was shamed into making my own applesauce by the local greengrocer, a middle-aged, slightly plump neighbor who ran the small grocery shop at the end of our cul-de-sac. When I arrived one morning, my goal to buy applesauce as an accompaniment to a pork roast planned for that night’s dinner, she sent me home to our rental cottage, with explicit directions to pick the apples on the trees behind our house, peel, core, chop them and cook them down into sauce. “Why would you buy applesauce, when you have those nice apples?”, she questioned me sternly. My father would have agreed.

A Love of Good Food

His memory, his love of good food, and the intensely rich times my family experienced in the kitchen and around the dinner table is the inspiration for, In The Kitchen With Bronwyn, a special place where the adventures I have today are as much about listening to your thoughts on food, learning from your experiences, as well as sharing my life and my love of good food. Because every moment in the kitchen, putting together a simple meal for your family or creating a celebration dinner for a dozen good friends, is a wonderful event. Each cooking opportunity is a time to stop and connect with your inner tenth muse, Gastera, as my father did so many years ago in Paris.

A Bientot!

 

 

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One response to “Cooking with Evan Jones: My Father’s Recipes, Part 4 of 4”

  1. Everyone loves it when folks get together and share ideas.

    Great blog, stick with it!

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