A culinary online center dedicated to promoting the importance and the joy of American home cooking with an emphasis on local products and talent, celebrating the unique spirit and energy of the new food world ethos, especially in Vermont.

amuse bouche

I love quotes that add meaning to my life. Here are a few to live by:

Americans who have been to France and come home craving a reminder of their magical European experience, love Vermont cheeses.
—Allison Hooper, founder, VT Butter & Cheese Creamery

Practice not cleaning your plate: it will help you eat less in short term and develop self-control in the long term.
—Michael Pollan

Sweet taste buds develop before all others, that’s why small children love sweets.
—Bronwyn Dunne

Don’t eat breakfast cereals that change the color of milk.
—Michael Pollan

My rule of thumb is, when in doubt, cook more than you think you may need.
—Marian Cunningham, from Learning to Cook


Digging the Dirt for a More Sustainable Future

Doesn’t it feel like Mother Nature seems to be guiding us through the pandemic with subtle hints –the birds sing more sweetly, the signs of spring, the early- blooming daffodils and tulips always hopeful, seem even more so this year.  If we listen and observe this time of pause, it can offer each of us an unprecedented opportunity to deepen our appreciation for our precious natural resources- our connection to the land and respect for something that is larger than ourselves.

I’ve always celebrated our local farmers but in this time of isolation and reduced access to food sources, I’ve embraced the opportunity to navigate the farming world I live in.  Amidst all the COVID19 changes, our access to locally grown food close to home has remained constant and comforting.  Dedicated farmers have been working tirelessly to provide the produce, meat and dairy products we’ve grown used to. There’s been no lack of lettuce, spinach, arugula, kale, eggs, chicken, and grass-fed beef for our tables.  With “curbside pick-up” and online order forms, local farmers have instituted creative, safe ways for us to access food, as nimbly as the most sophisticated urban food source.  And many –working with neighboring farms-  have banded together to sell farm products on a single website, to help each other and to make our local shopping easier.

This is no easy task to create an abundant food source when national supplies are threatened.  But once again, Vermont shines as a leader in demonstrating that small farms and innovative farming offers an excellent solution to provide healthy food for our families.

In the weeks ahead, Bronwyn and I will delve into the stories of Vermont Farmers who provide us with an edible landscape close to home, we hope you will join us in our appreciation for how fortunate we are to have so many committed individuals who have chosen to work the land for us.  We live in a remarkable state and we know it.   As we wake up to the possibility of a new way of living our lives, let’s envision one that is more intentional, sustainable  -one that brings deeper meaning. 

Who knew there could be so many cleverly- named farms in our state? Someday Farm, Fairy Tale Farm, Last Resort Farm, Reap and Sow, Bread and Butter Farm -those along with others, Trillium Hill Farm and Jasper Hill that honor a place or family tradition.  And, behind each name, there is a story, a story of how they evolved, and how this choice of working the land with devotion and fortitude has made our state a mecca for small farm farming.

As Bronwyn and I continue to experience the wonders of local and organic, we are eager to share these stories and images of the farmers who are continually evolving the concept of farming in Vermont with crops never grown here before –rice, artichokes, micro-greens- and methods that are innovative, changing the image of the state from black and white cows and pails of maple sap to cheese caves and large composting facilities, state –of- the -art greenhouses and  high-end sorting machinery.

Join us in the coming months to read the stories of what we promise will be a cornucopia of deliciousness as we dig deeper into the land and the lives of our farmers. We hope you will enjoy the tapestry of stories and photos of the men and women we call “Heroes” and the beauty of farms willing to innovate for the life and health of our state and of our world.

Laurie Caswell Burke

Catch up with Bronwyn on Food52 in a memory of an iconic lunch with Judith Jones and Julia Clancy.

Posted: 5-16-2020

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Doesn’t it feel like Mother Nature seems to be guiding us through the pandemic with subtle hints –the birds sing more sweetly, the signs of spring, the early- blooming daffodils and tulips always hopeful, seem even more so this year.  If we listen and observe this time of pause, it can offer each of us an unprecedented opportunity to deepen our appreciation for our precious natural resources- our connection to the land and respect for something that is larger than ourselves.

I’ve always celebrated our local farmers but in this time of isolation and reduced access to food sources, I’ve embraced the opportunity to navigate the farming world I live in.  Amidst all the COVID19 changes, our access to locally grown food close to home has remained constant and comforting.  Dedicated farmers have been working tirelessly to provide the produce, meat and dairy products we’ve grown used to. There’s been no lack of lettuce, spinach, arugula, kale, eggs, chicken, and grass-fed beef for our tables.  With “curbside pick-up” and online order forms, local farmers have instituted creative, safe ways for us to access food, as nimbly as the most sophisticated urban food source.  And many –working with neighboring farms-  have banded together to sell farm products on a single website, to help each other and to make our local shopping easier.

This is no easy task to create an abundant food source when national supplies are threatened.  But once again, Vermont shines as a leader in demonstrating that small farms and innovative farming offers an excellent solution to provide healthy food for our families.

In the weeks ahead, Bronwyn and I will delve into the stories of Vermont Farmers who provide us with an edible landscape close to home, we hope you will join us in our appreciation for how fortunate we are to have so many committed individuals who have chosen to work the land for us.  We live in a remarkable state and we know it.   As we wake up to the possibility of a new way of living our lives, let’s envision one that is more intentional, sustainable  -one that brings deeper meaning. 

Who knew there could be so many cleverly- named farms in our state? Someday Farm, Fairy Tale Farm, Last Resort Farm, Reap and Sow, Bread and Butter Farm -those along with others, Trillium Hill Farm and Jasper Hill that honor a place or family tradition.  And, behind each name, there is a story, a story of how they evolved, and how this choice of working the land with devotion and fortitude has made our state a mecca for small farm farming.

As Bronwyn and I continue to experience the wonders of local and organic, we are eager to share these stories and images of the farmers who are continually evolving the concept of farming in Vermont with crops never grown here before –rice, artichokes, micro-greens- and methods that are innovative, changing the image of the state from black and white cows and pails of maple sap to cheese caves and large composting facilities, state –of- the -art greenhouses and  high-end sorting machinery.

Join us in the coming months to read the stories of what we promise will be a cornucopia of deliciousness as we dig deeper into the land and the lives of our farmers. We hope you will enjoy the tapestry of stories and photos of the men and women we call “Heroes” and the beauty of farms willing to innovate for the life and health of our state and of our world.

Laurie Caswell Burke

Catch up with Bronwyn on Food52 in a memory of an iconic lunch with Judith Jones and Julia Clancy.

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Doesn’t it feel like Mother Nature seems to be guiding us through the pandemic with subtle hints –the birds sing more sweetly, the signs of spring, the early- blooming daffodils and tulips always hopeful, seem even more so this year.  If we listen and observe this time of pause, it can offer each of us an unprecedented opportunity to deepen our appreciation for our precious natural resources- our connection to the land and respect for something that is larger than ourselves.

I’ve always celebrated our local farmers but in this time of isolation and reduced access to food sources, I’ve embraced the opportunity to navigate the farming world I live in.  Amidst all the COVID19 changes, our access to locally grown food close to home has remained constant and comforting.  Dedicated farmers have been working tirelessly to provide the produce, meat and dairy products we’ve grown used to. There’s been no lack of lettuce, spinach, arugula, kale, eggs, chicken, and grass-fed beef for our tables.  With “curbside pick-up” and online order forms, local farmers have instituted creative, safe ways for us to access food, as nimbly as the most sophisticated urban food source.  And many –working with neighboring farms-  have banded together to sell farm products on a single website, to help each other and to make our local shopping easier.

This is no easy task to create an abundant food source when national supplies are threatened.  But once again, Vermont shines as a leader in demonstrating that small farms and innovative farming offers an excellent solution to provide healthy food for our families.

In the weeks ahead, Bronwyn and I will delve into the stories of Vermont Farmers who provide us with an edible landscape close to home, we hope you will join us in our appreciation for how fortunate we are to have so many committed individuals who have chosen to work the land for us.  We live in a remarkable state and we know it.   As we wake up to the possibility of a new way of living our lives, let’s envision one that is more intentional, sustainable  -one that brings deeper meaning. 

Who knew there could be so many cleverly- named farms in our state? Someday Farm, Fairy Tale Farm, Last Resort Farm, Reap and Sow, Bread and Butter Farm -those along with others, Trillium Hill Farm and Jasper Hill that honor a place or family tradition.  And, behind each name, there is a story, a story of how they evolved, and how this choice of working the land with devotion and fortitude has made our state a mecca for small farm farming.

As Bronwyn and I continue to experience the wonders of local and organic, we are eager to share these stories and images of the farmers who are continually evolving the concept of farming in Vermont with crops never grown here before –rice, artichokes, micro-greens- and methods that are innovative, changing the image of the state from black and white cows and pails of maple sap to cheese caves and large composting facilities, state –of- the -art greenhouses and  high-end sorting machinery.

Join us in the coming months to read the stories of what we promise will be a cornucopia of deliciousness as we dig deeper into the land and the lives of our farmers. We hope you will enjoy the tapestry of stories and photos of the men and women we call “Heroes” and the beauty of farms willing to innovate for the life and health of our state and of our world.

Laurie Caswell Burke

Catch up with Bronwyn on Food52 in a memory of an iconic lunch with Judith Jones and Julia Clancy.

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Doesn’t it feel like Mother Nature seems to be guiding us through the pandemic with subtle hints –the birds sing more sweetly, the signs of spring, the early- blooming daffodils and tulips always hopeful, seem even more so this year.  If we listen and observe this time of pause, it can offer each of us an unprecedented opportunity to deepen our appreciation for our precious natural resources- our connection to the land and respect for something that is larger than ourselves.

I’ve always celebrated our local farmers but in this time of isolation and reduced access to food sources, I’ve embraced the opportunity to navigate the farming world I live in.  Amidst all the COVID19 changes, our access to locally grown food close to home has remained constant and comforting.  Dedicated farmers have been working tirelessly to provide the produce, meat and dairy products we’ve grown used to. There’s been no lack of lettuce, spinach, arugula, kale, eggs, chicken, and grass-fed beef for our tables.  With “curbside pick-up” and online order forms, local farmers have instituted creative, safe ways for us to access food, as nimbly as the most sophisticated urban food source.  And many –working with neighboring farms-  have banded together to sell farm products on a single website, to help each other and to make our local shopping easier.

This is no easy task to create an abundant food source when national supplies are threatened.  But once again, Vermont shines as a leader in demonstrating that small farms and innovative farming offers an excellent solution to provide healthy food for our families.

In the weeks ahead, Bronwyn and I will delve into the stories of Vermont Farmers who provide us with an edible landscape close to home, we hope you will join us in our appreciation for how fortunate we are to have so many committed individuals who have chosen to work the land for us.  We live in a remarkable state and we know it.   As we wake up to the possibility of a new way of living our lives, let’s envision one that is more intentional, sustainable  -one that brings deeper meaning. 

Who knew there could be so many cleverly- named farms in our state? Someday Farm, Fairy Tale Farm, Last Resort Farm, Reap and Sow, Bread and Butter Farm -those along with others, Trillium Hill Farm and Jasper Hill that honor a place or family tradition.  And, behind each name, there is a story, a story of how they evolved, and how this choice of working the land with devotion and fortitude has made our state a mecca for small farm farming.

As Bronwyn and I continue to experience the wonders of local and organic, we are eager to share these stories and images of the farmers who are continually evolving the concept of farming in Vermont with crops never grown here before –rice, artichokes, micro-greens- and methods that are innovative, changing the image of the state from black and white cows and pails of maple sap to cheese caves and large composting facilities, state –of- the -art greenhouses and  high-end sorting machinery.

Join us in the coming months to read the stories of what we promise will be a cornucopia of deliciousness as we dig deeper into the land and the lives of our farmers. We hope you will enjoy the tapestry of stories and photos of the men and women we call “Heroes” and the beauty of farms willing to innovate for the life and health of our state and of our world.

Laurie Caswell Burke

Catch up with Bronwyn on Food52 in a memory of an iconic lunch with Judith Jones and Julia Clancy.

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One response to “Digging the Dirt for a More Sustainable Future”

  1. Love it Laurie! Great article — looking forward to reading about Vermont farms — one farmer looks familiar!!

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