A culinary online center dedicated to promoting the importance and the joy of American home cooking with an emphasis on local products and talent, celebrating the unique spirit and energy of the new food world ethos, especially in Vermont.

amuse bouche

I love quotes that add meaning to my life. Here are a few to live by:

Americans who have been to France and come home craving a reminder of their magical European experience, love Vermont cheeses.
—Allison Hooper, founder, VT Butter & Cheese Creamery

Practice not cleaning your plate: it will help you eat less in short term and develop self-control in the long term.
—Michael Pollan

Sweet taste buds develop before all others, that’s why small children love sweets.
—Bronwyn Dunne

Don’t eat breakfast cereals that change the color of milk.
—Michael Pollan

My rule of thumb is, when in doubt, cook more than you think you may need.
—Marian Cunningham, from Learning to Cook


Cooking with Evan Jones: My Father’s Recipes, Part 1 of 4

Bronwyn Dunne as a girl with her father Evan Jones

Bronwyn Dunne with her father Evan Jones

Growing Up
When I was growing up, my father’s recipes were everywhere. Usually stacked on his desk in off-kilter piles looking like miniature Towers of Pisa, they also often littered the kitchen counters where they become covered in flour and stained with oil and water. It wasn’t just that my father was interested in cooking; my father’s recipes were becoming an important part of his writing career. He was a writer with food a focal point. At a time when Craig Claiborne was only just becoming a household name and James Beard’s career as a cooking expert was taking off, my father’s research of American food was creating a new culinary category for the decades of food interest that followed.

Salisbury Steak
Evan Jones was a divorced father living in New York, visited by his children on weekends. When I would arrive at his apartment door on Friday evenings, I’d find him sitting at his typewriter clicking away in his two-finger style.  At the sound of my voice, he would stub out his cigarette in an ashtray already filled with the burnt ends of Camels or Gitanes, and walk away from the work until Sunday night, when I returned to my mother’s suburban home. He left his desk but the recipes weren’t left behind. They became the structure of our weekend.

“Have you ever had Salisbury steak?”, he asked one day when I arrived a little later than usual. It was time to cook dinner and, in the tiny New York kitchen, we worried a new recipe into life with all the care of catering for a king. It was 1954, my stepmother was staying late at her office and I was sous-chef for the first time. If my father were alive today, he would wonder why I remembered this particular recipe since now Salisbury steak is hardly thought of except with nostalgia. But, in those days, the days before Julia Child revolutionized cooking in America and preparing food became an art not only in France but also at home, the recipe was novel, another way of using ground meat that wasn’t the great American pastime, hamburgers.

He’d never asked me to help him prepare the main dish before. That’s why I remember the moment. I’d helped peel and scrape and shuck and pound but I’d never really been given the responsibility of working on the main dish of the moment with my father. “Here’s an apron”. He threw me one of my stepmother’s, as he tied his own large dark blue and white striped apron around his waist. “Let’s see what we can do.”

See our recipe for Salisbury Steak.

Ambition
I realize now that my father was only thirty-nine that year. He was a young man, younger than his granddaughter, my daughter, is now, and he’d been married and divorced and married again. He was still a man starting out in New York, making his way in the world of publishing. His life’s ambition was to write the great American novel, to add his name to the ranks of the literary heroes of the day, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Carl Sandburg, Theodore Dreiser.

To be continued in the next post….Please check back or subscribe to my blog to automatically receive it!

A bientot!

Posted: 4-11-2012

object(WP_Query)#941 (51) {
  ["query_vars"]=>
  array(65) {
    ["page"]=>
    int(0)
    ["name"]=>
    string(9) "even_jone"
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["error"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["m"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["p"]=>
    int(0)
    ["post_parent"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["static"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["pagename"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["page_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["second"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["minute"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["hour"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["day"]=>
    int(0)
    ["monthnum"]=>
    int(0)
    ["year"]=>
    int(0)
    ["w"]=>
    int(0)
    ["tag"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["cat"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["tag_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author_name"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["feed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["tb"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["paged"]=>
    int(0)
    ["meta_key"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["meta_value"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["preview"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["s"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["sentence"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["title"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["fields"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["menu_order"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["embed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["category__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_name__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["ignore_sticky_posts"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["suppress_filters"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["cache_results"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_term_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["lazy_load_term_meta"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_meta_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["post_type"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["posts_per_page"]=>
    int(5)
    ["nopaging"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["comments_per_page"]=>
    string(2) "50"
    ["no_found_rows"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["order"]=>
    string(4) "DESC"
  }
  ["tax_query"]=>
  NULL
  ["meta_query"]=>
  object(WP_Meta_Query)#375 (9) {
    ["queries"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["relation"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["table_aliases:protected"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["clauses:protected"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["has_or_relation:protected"]=>
    bool(false)
  }
  ["date_query"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["post_count"]=>
  int(1)
  ["current_post"]=>
  int(0)
  ["in_the_loop"]=>
  bool(true)
  ["comment_count"]=>
  int(0)
  ["current_comment"]=>
  int(-1)
  ["found_posts"]=>
  int(1)
  ["max_num_pages"]=>
  int(0)
  ["max_num_comment_pages"]=>
  int(0)
  ["is_single"]=>
  bool(true)
  ["is_preview"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_page"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_archive"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_date"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_year"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_month"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_day"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_time"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_author"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_category"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_tag"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_tax"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_search"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_feed"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_comment_feed"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_trackback"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_home"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_404"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_embed"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_paged"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_admin"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_attachment"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_singular"]=>
  bool(true)
  ["is_robots"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_posts_page"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_post_type_archive"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["query_vars_hash:private"]=>
  string(32) "54e992f3a7c60ee7c96d890aeea553bc"
  ["query_vars_changed:private"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["thumbnails_cached"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["stopwords:private"]=>
  NULL
  ["compat_fields:private"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(15) "query_vars_hash"
    [1]=>
    string(18) "query_vars_changed"
  }
  ["compat_methods:private"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(16) "init_query_flags"
    [1]=>
    string(15) "parse_tax_query"
  }
  ["query"]=>
  array(3) {
    ["page"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["name"]=>
    string(9) "even_jone"
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
  }
  ["request"]=>
  string(149) "SELECT   wp_posts.* FROM wp_posts  WHERE 1=1  AND wp_posts.post_name = 'even_jone' AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post'  ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC "
  ["posts"]=>
  &array(1) {
    [0]=>
    object(WP_Post)#373 (24) {
      ["ID"]=>
      int(1)
      ["post_author"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_date"]=>
      string(19) "2012-04-11 19:59:06"
      ["post_date_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2012-04-11 19:59:06"
      ["post_content"]=>
      string(4401) "[caption id="attachment_358" align="alignleft" width="229" caption="Bronwyn Dunne with her father Evan Jones"]Bronwyn Dunne as a girl with her father Evan Jones[/caption]

Growing Up
When I was growing up, my father’s recipes were everywhere. Usually stacked on his desk in off-kilter piles looking like miniature Towers of Pisa, they also often littered the kitchen counters where they become covered in flour and stained with oil and water. It wasn’t just that my father was interested in cooking; my father’s recipes were becoming an important part of his writing career. He was a writer with food a focal point. At a time when Craig Claiborne was only just becoming a household name and James Beard’s career as a cooking expert was taking off, my father’s research of American food was creating a new culinary category for the decades of food interest that followed.

Salisbury Steak
Evan Jones was a divorced father living in New York, visited by his children on weekends. When I would arrive at his apartment door on Friday evenings, I’d find him sitting at his typewriter clicking away in his two-finger style.  At the sound of my voice, he would stub out his cigarette in an ashtray already filled with the burnt ends of Camels or Gitanes, and walk away from the work until Sunday night, when I returned to my mother’s suburban home. He left his desk but the recipes weren’t left behind. They became the structure of our weekend.

“Have you ever had Salisbury steak?”, he asked one day when I arrived a little later than usual. It was time to cook dinner and, in the tiny New York kitchen, we worried a new recipe into life with all the care of catering for a king. It was 1954, my stepmother was staying late at her office and I was sous-chef for the first time. If my father were alive today, he would wonder why I remembered this particular recipe since now Salisbury steak is hardly thought of except with nostalgia. But, in those days, the days before Julia Child revolutionized cooking in America and preparing food became an art not only in France but also at home, the recipe was novel, another way of using ground meat that wasn’t the great American pastime, hamburgers.

He’d never asked me to help him prepare the main dish before. That’s why I remember the moment. I’d helped peel and scrape and shuck and pound but I’d never really been given the responsibility of working on the main dish of the moment with my father. “Here’s an apron”. He threw me one of my stepmother’s, as he tied his own large dark blue and white striped apron around his waist. “Let’s see what we can do.”

See our recipe for Salisbury Steak.

Ambition
I realize now that my father was only thirty-nine that year. He was a young man, younger than his granddaughter, my daughter, is now, and he’d been married and divorced and married again. He was still a man starting out in New York, making his way in the world of publishing. His life’s ambition was to write the great American novel, to add his name to the ranks of the literary heroes of the day, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Carl Sandburg, Theodore Dreiser.

To be continued in the next post….Please check back or subscribe to my blog to automatically receive it!

A bientot!

" ["post_title"]=> string(60) "Cooking with Evan Jones: My Father’s Recipes, Part 1 of 4" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(262) "When I was growing up, my father’s recipes were everywhere. Usually stacked on his desk in off-kilter piles looking like miniature Towers of Pisa, they also often littered the kitchen counters where they become covered in flour and stained with oil and water. " ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(9) "even_jone" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(74) " http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/featured-recipes/etiam-ut-nulla-risus/" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2012-09-24 16:17:47" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2012-09-24 16:17:47" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(39) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=1" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(2) "14" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#373 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(1) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2012-04-11 19:59:06" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2012-04-11 19:59:06" ["post_content"]=> string(4401) "[caption id="attachment_358" align="alignleft" width="229" caption="Bronwyn Dunne with her father Evan Jones"]Bronwyn Dunne as a girl with her father Evan Jones[/caption]

Growing Up
When I was growing up, my father’s recipes were everywhere. Usually stacked on his desk in off-kilter piles looking like miniature Towers of Pisa, they also often littered the kitchen counters where they become covered in flour and stained with oil and water. It wasn’t just that my father was interested in cooking; my father’s recipes were becoming an important part of his writing career. He was a writer with food a focal point. At a time when Craig Claiborne was only just becoming a household name and James Beard’s career as a cooking expert was taking off, my father’s research of American food was creating a new culinary category for the decades of food interest that followed.

Salisbury Steak
Evan Jones was a divorced father living in New York, visited by his children on weekends. When I would arrive at his apartment door on Friday evenings, I’d find him sitting at his typewriter clicking away in his two-finger style.  At the sound of my voice, he would stub out his cigarette in an ashtray already filled with the burnt ends of Camels or Gitanes, and walk away from the work until Sunday night, when I returned to my mother’s suburban home. He left his desk but the recipes weren’t left behind. They became the structure of our weekend.

“Have you ever had Salisbury steak?”, he asked one day when I arrived a little later than usual. It was time to cook dinner and, in the tiny New York kitchen, we worried a new recipe into life with all the care of catering for a king. It was 1954, my stepmother was staying late at her office and I was sous-chef for the first time. If my father were alive today, he would wonder why I remembered this particular recipe since now Salisbury steak is hardly thought of except with nostalgia. But, in those days, the days before Julia Child revolutionized cooking in America and preparing food became an art not only in France but also at home, the recipe was novel, another way of using ground meat that wasn’t the great American pastime, hamburgers.

He’d never asked me to help him prepare the main dish before. That’s why I remember the moment. I’d helped peel and scrape and shuck and pound but I’d never really been given the responsibility of working on the main dish of the moment with my father. “Here’s an apron”. He threw me one of my stepmother’s, as he tied his own large dark blue and white striped apron around his waist. “Let’s see what we can do.”

See our recipe for Salisbury Steak.

Ambition
I realize now that my father was only thirty-nine that year. He was a young man, younger than his granddaughter, my daughter, is now, and he’d been married and divorced and married again. He was still a man starting out in New York, making his way in the world of publishing. His life’s ambition was to write the great American novel, to add his name to the ranks of the literary heroes of the day, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Carl Sandburg, Theodore Dreiser.

To be continued in the next post….Please check back or subscribe to my blog to automatically receive it!

A bientot!

" ["post_title"]=> string(60) "Cooking with Evan Jones: My Father’s Recipes, Part 1 of 4" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(262) "When I was growing up, my father’s recipes were everywhere. Usually stacked on his desk in off-kilter piles looking like miniature Towers of Pisa, they also often littered the kitchen counters where they become covered in flour and stained with oil and water. " ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(9) "even_jone" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(74) " http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/featured-recipes/etiam-ut-nulla-risus/" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2012-09-24 16:17:47" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2012-09-24 16:17:47" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(39) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=1" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(2) "14" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["queried_object"]=> object(WP_Post)#373 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(1) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2012-04-11 19:59:06" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2012-04-11 19:59:06" ["post_content"]=> string(4401) "[caption id="attachment_358" align="alignleft" width="229" caption="Bronwyn Dunne with her father Evan Jones"]Bronwyn Dunne as a girl with her father Evan Jones[/caption]

Growing Up
When I was growing up, my father’s recipes were everywhere. Usually stacked on his desk in off-kilter piles looking like miniature Towers of Pisa, they also often littered the kitchen counters where they become covered in flour and stained with oil and water. It wasn’t just that my father was interested in cooking; my father’s recipes were becoming an important part of his writing career. He was a writer with food a focal point. At a time when Craig Claiborne was only just becoming a household name and James Beard’s career as a cooking expert was taking off, my father’s research of American food was creating a new culinary category for the decades of food interest that followed.

Salisbury Steak
Evan Jones was a divorced father living in New York, visited by his children on weekends. When I would arrive at his apartment door on Friday evenings, I’d find him sitting at his typewriter clicking away in his two-finger style.  At the sound of my voice, he would stub out his cigarette in an ashtray already filled with the burnt ends of Camels or Gitanes, and walk away from the work until Sunday night, when I returned to my mother’s suburban home. He left his desk but the recipes weren’t left behind. They became the structure of our weekend.

“Have you ever had Salisbury steak?”, he asked one day when I arrived a little later than usual. It was time to cook dinner and, in the tiny New York kitchen, we worried a new recipe into life with all the care of catering for a king. It was 1954, my stepmother was staying late at her office and I was sous-chef for the first time. If my father were alive today, he would wonder why I remembered this particular recipe since now Salisbury steak is hardly thought of except with nostalgia. But, in those days, the days before Julia Child revolutionized cooking in America and preparing food became an art not only in France but also at home, the recipe was novel, another way of using ground meat that wasn’t the great American pastime, hamburgers.

He’d never asked me to help him prepare the main dish before. That’s why I remember the moment. I’d helped peel and scrape and shuck and pound but I’d never really been given the responsibility of working on the main dish of the moment with my father. “Here’s an apron”. He threw me one of my stepmother’s, as he tied his own large dark blue and white striped apron around his waist. “Let’s see what we can do.”

See our recipe for Salisbury Steak.

Ambition
I realize now that my father was only thirty-nine that year. He was a young man, younger than his granddaughter, my daughter, is now, and he’d been married and divorced and married again. He was still a man starting out in New York, making his way in the world of publishing. His life’s ambition was to write the great American novel, to add his name to the ranks of the literary heroes of the day, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Carl Sandburg, Theodore Dreiser.

To be continued in the next post….Please check back or subscribe to my blog to automatically receive it!

A bientot!

" ["post_title"]=> string(60) "Cooking with Evan Jones: My Father’s Recipes, Part 1 of 4" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(262) "When I was growing up, my father’s recipes were everywhere. Usually stacked on his desk in off-kilter piles looking like miniature Towers of Pisa, they also often littered the kitchen counters where they become covered in flour and stained with oil and water. " ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(9) "even_jone" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(74) " http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/featured-recipes/etiam-ut-nulla-risus/" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2012-09-24 16:17:47" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2012-09-24 16:17:47" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(39) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=1" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(2) "14" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["queried_object_id"]=> int(1) }
SUBSCRIBE TO THIS BLOG’S FEED

14 responses to “Cooking with Evan Jones: My Father’s Recipes, Part 1 of 4”

  1. very good publish, i definitely love this web site, carry on it

  2. I enjoy the efforts you have put in this, thankyou for all the great articles .

  3. Carli Melcer says:

    I was studying some of your content on this website and I think this web site is very instructive! Keep posting .

  4. I wish to show some thanks to you just for bailing me out of this situation. Just after researching throughout the world-wide-web and meeting notions which are not pleasant, I was thinking my entire life was over. Existing devoid of the answers to the issues you’ve resolved by way of your entire site is a crucial case, and the ones which may have negatively affected my entire career if I hadn’t noticed your web page. Your main skills and kindness in maneuvering all areas was excellent. I’m not sure what I would have done if I had not come across such a solution like this. I can at this point look forward to my future. Thanks a lot very much for this high quality and results-oriented guide. I won’t think twice to propose your web page to anybody who would need support on this problem.

  5. Ray Marren says:

    I’m often to blogging and i really admire your content. The article has really peaks my interest. I’m going to bookmark your website and hold checking for new information.

  6. Karl Cavener says:

    I see something really special in this internet site .

  7. Jc Jentsch says:

    I really like your writing style, fantastic info , appreciate it for posting : D.

  8. Glad I discovered this on google .

  9. Sweet site, super style and design , really clean and use genial .

  10. I like this web site very much, Its a real nice place to read and incur info .

  11. some truly prime posts on this website , saved to fav.

  12. visit says:

    I really like it when people come together and share ideas, great blog, continue the good work.

  13. Chris says:

    Nice writeup, All the best

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


 

flickrinejoin

TASTY PICKS

Good Food & Noteworthy Businesses

Hardwick Beef Ad #2

 


a La Carte Videos

Bronwyn Dunne and Judith Jones Prepare Two Potato Salads at Bryn Teg. See the recipes


Gateau de Crepes- In Molly’s Kitchen.
See recipe from the Smitten Kitchen



Blog Archives

Recipe Archives

  • Three New Must-Haves For Your Spice Cabinet - Jul 2019
  • Unagi – Preparation and Serving Suggestions - Jun 2019
  • Go Bananas at Burlington Farmer’s Market - May 2019
  • Gluten Free Banana Oatmeal Pancakes - May 2019
  • A Love Affair with Fermented Fare - Mar 2019
  • Strong Hands + Patience: Recipes for Home Fermenting - Jan 2019
  • Muffins posing as cupcakes - Dec 2018
  • ‘Tis the Season - Dec 2018
  • Four Things I learned in Cooking Class - Oct 2018
  • Moussaka - Oct 2018
  • I Love Early Fall…From My Head…To-ma-toes - Sep 2018
  • Three uses for a bounty of apples - Aug 2018
  • Strawberry Rhubarb Salsa - Jul 2018
  • Egg White Casserole with Sweet Potato Crust - Apr 2018
  • Chicken Dijonaise – Slow Cooker: The Best Cookbook Ever - Feb 2018
  • Winter Root Soup – Nourishing Traditions - Feb 2018
  • Soooo Many Momos - Sep 2017
  • Sautéed Fiddleheads in Butter with Lemon and Garlic - May 2017
  • A Recipe for the Holidays from Shelburne Farms - Nov 2013
  • The “Zetterburger” Recipe - Aug 2013
  • Homemade Fresh Mozzarella Recipe - Jul 2013
  • Twin Farms’ Gluten-Free Soufflé Pancake Recipe - Jun 2013
  • Potato Salad Two Ways - Mar 2013
  • It’s Easy Being Green—If You’re a Soup! - Feb 2013
  • For The Love of Valentine’s Day, A Chocolate Mousse - Feb 2013
  • Happy New Year Resolutions – Roasted Root Vegetables - Jan 2013
  • The Best Cheesecake in the World - Dec 2012
  • Tarte aux Pommes – A Holiday Gift to You - Dec 2012
  • A Thanksgiving Memory with a Memorable Brining Recipe - Nov 2012
  • Chicken with Artichokes & Honey – The Recipe - Nov 2012
  • Alison Baker’s Tomato Coconut Soup - Oct 2012
  • Basil, Lettuce and Tomato Sandwich – The Recipe - Oct 2012
  • Cold Pea Soup- The Recipe - Sep 2012
  • Onion Tart with Anchovies & Black Olives- Recipe for Pissaladiere Nicoise - Sep 2012
  • Boeuf Bourguignon - Apr 2012
  • Gingery Shrimp with Asparagus and Edamame - Apr 2012
  • Salisbury Steak - Apr 2012