A culinary online center dedicated to promoting the importance and the joy of American home cooking with an emphasis on local products and talent, celebrating the unique spirit and energy of the new food world ethos, especially in Vermont.

amuse bouche

I love quotes that add meaning to my life. Here are a few to live by:

Americans who have been to France and come home craving a reminder of their magical European experience, love Vermont cheeses.
—Allison Hooper, founder, VT Butter & Cheese Creamery

Practice not cleaning your plate: it will help you eat less in short term and develop self-control in the long term.
—Michael Pollan

Sweet taste buds develop before all others, that’s why small children love sweets.
—Bronwyn Dunne

Don’t eat breakfast cereals that change the color of milk.
—Michael Pollan

My rule of thumb is, when in doubt, cook more than you think you may need.
—Marian Cunningham, from Learning to Cook


Fairfield Farm at The Hotchkiss School: Where Academics & Agriculture Meet

I’ve followed the progress of a five-year old agricultural program at The Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut over the last few months. Brought to my attention by friends who live in the area, I see this school program as a companion story to the remarkable efforts going on in Vermont to bring farms to students in innovative ways.

Fairfield farm at Hotchkiss

Aerial view of Fairfield Farm taken by Stefen Turner

A Gift that has Changed the Way the School Thinks about Food Sustainability

When I met Kurt Hinck, lean and tan with a blond crew cut and a killer smile, he was about to spend his last summer at The Hotchkiss School, managing the all-organic Fairfield Farm. Two hundred and eighty acres of fields with three farmhouses, and a number of outbuildings and barns comprises the gift of Jack Blum, an alumnus, former trustee and past commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Agriculture, and his wife, Jan, given to the prestigious private school in Lakeville, Connecticut. It’s a gift that has changed the way the school thinks about food sustainability, while, at the same time, underscores the importance it places on the stewardship of the environment.

After Years of Being on Campus

Kurt joined the farm program in 2010 after years of being on campus as the son of employees and then as a student. The Hotchkiss School had been his world except for the four years he spent at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania. He was going to miss the rolling hills of Lakeville but he was also excited to fulfill a dream by joining the Officer Training Program of the United States Marine Corp.

Talking with me in the fields at Fairfield Farm, l to r: Kurt Hinck, Fairfield Farm Manager; Allen Cockerline, farm advisor,  student, and Charlie Noyes, Ffeat administrator at the Hotchkiss School. Photo by Tom Zetterstrom.

Talking with me in the fields at Fairfield Farm, l to r: Kurt Hinck, Fairfield Farm manager; Allen Cockerline, farm advisor; student; and Charles Noyes, Ffeat administrator at The Hotchkiss School. Photo by Tom Zetterstrom.

The Farm’s Accomplishments

In early September, as Kurt was traveling by train to New York City for a last Big City-break before joining the Marines, I talked to him, again, this time about the farm’s accomplishments over the summer. With the sound of the train’s wheels rolling along in the background, I heard his pride and pleasure in the way the summer program had worked. He was positive about the contribution the farm was making to The Hotchkiss School’s overall interest in the sciences and the environment. His mentorship of six summer student interns, four-days a week had turned out well.

He was also proud of the way the program has partnered with Food Services at the school. It’s a synergistic relationship. The seven pigs—now weighing three hundred pounds each—raised on the farm, are eating not only corn grown there but also the organic waste from The Hotchkiss School’s kitchens. Andrew Cox, formerly of the Harvard School of Government, now head of the Sodexo-managed school dining services as the Director of Sustainability, says that 90% of what Fairfield Farm produces goes into the cafeteria food system. Another 10% goes to the local food bank. This includes a variety of vegetables—squash, potatoes, corn, carrots, beets, turnips, kale, Swiss chard, spinach, bok choy, arugula, lettuce, tomatoes and cucumbers—and meat, including three hundred chickens, all the eggs they lay, as well as 30 turkeys that come to the table as a pre-Thanksgiving dinner for the students.

Students of The Hotchkiss School working with Charlie Noyes in the fields at Fairfield Farm. Photo by Jonathan Doster.

Students of The Hotchkiss School working with Charles Noyes in the fields at Fairfield Farm. Photo by Jonathan Doster.

Stewardship and Mentorship

Kurt pointed out to me that if it hadn’t been for the stewardship of Allen Cockerline, owner of the all-organic Whippoorwill Farm, a close neighbor to The Hotchkiss School, they wouldn’t have the beef cattle that he pastures at Fairfield Farm, or the mentorship he’s provided. Charles Noyes, an instructor of art at the school for twenty-five years, as well as an enthusiastic alumnus, is now also head of the Ffeat (Fairfield Farms Environmental and Adventure Farm) program initiated over five years ago. As hands-on Farm Curriculum Coordinator of the program, Charles also oversees twenty-four students who mend fences, clear trails, sow seeds, and harvest crops during the academic year.  They also join their supervisor once a month in the kitchen to create a dinner from the produce they have grown and the poultry they have raised.

A Living Laboratory for the Study of Agriculture and the Environment

It is a fortunate school that can claim the privilege of being a recipient of a million dollar grant for their science and math departments—as The Hotchkiss School can claim. But, it is even a more fortunate school that can claim it has a living laboratory for the study of agriculture. It is very fortunate students who have the opportunity to train in the husbandry of land and animals, learning the value of sustainability, the resourcefulness of small farm farming—the pleasures of reaping what you sow and of cooking what you reap.

Fairfield Farm has also provided a learning base for many disciplines at The Hotchkiss School.  As Joshua Hahn, the Assistant Head of Schools and Director of Environmental Initiatives, and a major force in incorporating the farm into the school curriculum, is quick to point out. Academic studies that use the farm property to teach include environmental science, nutrition, arts and literature. He says there are hundreds of students in the course of the school year who find the farm an outdoor classroom for their understanding of a diverse array of disciplines from biology to poetry.

Students harvesting delicata squash. Photo by Jonathan Doster.

Hotchkiss School students harvesting Delicata squash. Photo by Jonathan Doster.

One Small Farm at a Time

Everyone at The Hotchkiss School involved in Fairfield Farm recognizes the immense advantage this highly rated private school has in being able to encourage the quicksilver minds of its students to look beyond their textbooks and become advocates for local and organic agriculture.

It is clear to me that these same preparatory school students may well become the decision-makers of the future creating solutions for food sustainability and solving the problems of a changing environment that we cannot imagine today. As Joshua Hahn says, “We are teaching our students to solve problems and come up with solutions for the environment that adults have a hard time comprehending. They are having a direct experience applying what they’ve learned to finding those solutions.”  And in doing so, have an opportunity to change the world for the better one small farm at a time.

A Bientot,

P.S. This is the second of a three-part series on Farm to School programs. If you missed the first one, please see Farm to School: Not Just a Slogan.

Posted: 10-18-2013

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[caption id="attachment_2988" align="alignnone" width="518"]Fairfield farm at Hotchkiss Aerial view of Fairfield Farm taken by Stefen Turner[/caption]

A Gift that has Changed the Way the School Thinks about Food Sustainability

When I met Kurt Hinck, lean and tan with a blond crew cut and a killer smile, he was about to spend his last summer at The Hotchkiss School, managing the all-organic Fairfield Farm. Two hundred and eighty acres of fields with three farmhouses, and a number of outbuildings and barns comprises the gift of Jack Blum, an alumnus, former trustee and past commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Agriculture, and his wife, Jan, given to the prestigious private school in Lakeville, Connecticut. It’s a gift that has changed the way the school thinks about food sustainability, while, at the same time, underscores the importance it places on the stewardship of the environment.

After Years of Being on Campus

Kurt joined the farm program in 2010 after years of being on campus as the son of employees and then as a student. The Hotchkiss School had been his world except for the four years he spent at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania. He was going to miss the rolling hills of Lakeville but he was also excited to fulfill a dream by joining the Officer Training Program of the United States Marine Corp.

[caption id="attachment_2989" align="alignnone" width="518"]Talking with me in the fields at Fairfield Farm, l to r: Kurt Hinck, Fairfield Farm Manager; Allen Cockerline, farm advisor,  student, and Charlie Noyes, Ffeat administrator at the Hotchkiss School. Photo by Tom Zetterstrom. Talking with me in the fields at Fairfield Farm, l to r: Kurt Hinck, Fairfield Farm manager; Allen Cockerline, farm advisor; student; and Charles Noyes, Ffeat administrator at The Hotchkiss School. Photo by Tom Zetterstrom.[/caption]

The Farm’s Accomplishments

In early September, as Kurt was traveling by train to New York City for a last Big City-break before joining the Marines, I talked to him, again, this time about the farm’s accomplishments over the summer. With the sound of the train’s wheels rolling along in the background, I heard his pride and pleasure in the way the summer program had worked. He was positive about the contribution the farm was making to The Hotchkiss School’s overall interest in the sciences and the environment. His mentorship of six summer student interns, four-days a week had turned out well.

He was also proud of the way the program has partnered with Food Services at the school. It’s a synergistic relationship. The seven pigs—now weighing three hundred pounds each—raised on the farm, are eating not only corn grown there but also the organic waste from The Hotchkiss School’s kitchens. Andrew Cox, formerly of the Harvard School of Government, now head of the Sodexo-managed school dining services as the Director of Sustainability, says that 90% of what Fairfield Farm produces goes into the cafeteria food system. Another 10% goes to the local food bank. This includes a variety of vegetables—squash, potatoes, corn, carrots, beets, turnips, kale, Swiss chard, spinach, bok choy, arugula, lettuce, tomatoes and cucumbers—and meat, including three hundred chickens, all the eggs they lay, as well as 30 turkeys that come to the table as a pre-Thanksgiving dinner for the students.

[caption id="attachment_2991" align="alignnone" width="540"]Students of The Hotchkiss School working with Charlie Noyes in the fields at Fairfield Farm. Photo by Jonathan Doster. Students of The Hotchkiss School working with Charles Noyes in the fields at Fairfield Farm. Photo by Jonathan Doster.[/caption]

Stewardship and Mentorship

Kurt pointed out to me that if it hadn’t been for the stewardship of Allen Cockerline, owner of the all-organic Whippoorwill Farm, a close neighbor to The Hotchkiss School, they wouldn’t have the beef cattle that he pastures at Fairfield Farm, or the mentorship he’s provided. Charles Noyes, an instructor of art at the school for twenty-five years, as well as an enthusiastic alumnus, is now also head of the Ffeat (Fairfield Farms Environmental and Adventure Farm) program initiated over five years ago. As hands-on Farm Curriculum Coordinator of the program, Charles also oversees twenty-four students who mend fences, clear trails, sow seeds, and harvest crops during the academic year.  They also join their supervisor once a month in the kitchen to create a dinner from the produce they have grown and the poultry they have raised.

A Living Laboratory for the Study of Agriculture and the Environment

It is a fortunate school that can claim the privilege of being a recipient of a million dollar grant for their science and math departments—as The Hotchkiss School can claim. But, it is even a more fortunate school that can claim it has a living laboratory for the study of agriculture. It is very fortunate students who have the opportunity to train in the husbandry of land and animals, learning the value of sustainability, the resourcefulness of small farm farming—the pleasures of reaping what you sow and of cooking what you reap.

Fairfield Farm has also provided a learning base for many disciplines at The Hotchkiss School.  As Joshua Hahn, the Assistant Head of Schools and Director of Environmental Initiatives, and a major force in incorporating the farm into the school curriculum, is quick to point out. Academic studies that use the farm property to teach include environmental science, nutrition, arts and literature. He says there are hundreds of students in the course of the school year who find the farm an outdoor classroom for their understanding of a diverse array of disciplines from biology to poetry.

[caption id="attachment_2992" align="alignnone" width="518"]Students harvesting delicata squash. Photo by Jonathan Doster. Hotchkiss School students harvesting Delicata squash. Photo by Jonathan Doster.[/caption]

One Small Farm at a Time

Everyone at The Hotchkiss School involved in Fairfield Farm recognizes the immense advantage this highly rated private school has in being able to encourage the quicksilver minds of its students to look beyond their textbooks and become advocates for local and organic agriculture.

It is clear to me that these same preparatory school students may well become the decision-makers of the future creating solutions for food sustainability and solving the problems of a changing environment that we cannot imagine today. As Joshua Hahn says, “We are teaching our students to solve problems and come up with solutions for the environment that adults have a hard time comprehending. They are having a direct experience applying what they’ve learned to finding those solutions.”  And in doing so, have an opportunity to change the world for the better one small farm at a time.

A Bientot,



P.S. This is the second of a three-part series on Farm to School programs. If you missed the first one, please see Farm to School: Not Just a Slogan."
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[caption id="attachment_2988" align="alignnone" width="518"]Fairfield farm at Hotchkiss Aerial view of Fairfield Farm taken by Stefen Turner[/caption]

A Gift that has Changed the Way the School Thinks about Food Sustainability

When I met Kurt Hinck, lean and tan with a blond crew cut and a killer smile, he was about to spend his last summer at The Hotchkiss School, managing the all-organic Fairfield Farm. Two hundred and eighty acres of fields with three farmhouses, and a number of outbuildings and barns comprises the gift of Jack Blum, an alumnus, former trustee and past commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Agriculture, and his wife, Jan, given to the prestigious private school in Lakeville, Connecticut. It’s a gift that has changed the way the school thinks about food sustainability, while, at the same time, underscores the importance it places on the stewardship of the environment.

After Years of Being on Campus

Kurt joined the farm program in 2010 after years of being on campus as the son of employees and then as a student. The Hotchkiss School had been his world except for the four years he spent at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania. He was going to miss the rolling hills of Lakeville but he was also excited to fulfill a dream by joining the Officer Training Program of the United States Marine Corp.

[caption id="attachment_2989" align="alignnone" width="518"]Talking with me in the fields at Fairfield Farm, l to r: Kurt Hinck, Fairfield Farm Manager; Allen Cockerline, farm advisor,  student, and Charlie Noyes, Ffeat administrator at the Hotchkiss School. Photo by Tom Zetterstrom. Talking with me in the fields at Fairfield Farm, l to r: Kurt Hinck, Fairfield Farm manager; Allen Cockerline, farm advisor; student; and Charles Noyes, Ffeat administrator at The Hotchkiss School. Photo by Tom Zetterstrom.[/caption]

The Farm’s Accomplishments

In early September, as Kurt was traveling by train to New York City for a last Big City-break before joining the Marines, I talked to him, again, this time about the farm’s accomplishments over the summer. With the sound of the train’s wheels rolling along in the background, I heard his pride and pleasure in the way the summer program had worked. He was positive about the contribution the farm was making to The Hotchkiss School’s overall interest in the sciences and the environment. His mentorship of six summer student interns, four-days a week had turned out well.

He was also proud of the way the program has partnered with Food Services at the school. It’s a synergistic relationship. The seven pigs—now weighing three hundred pounds each—raised on the farm, are eating not only corn grown there but also the organic waste from The Hotchkiss School’s kitchens. Andrew Cox, formerly of the Harvard School of Government, now head of the Sodexo-managed school dining services as the Director of Sustainability, says that 90% of what Fairfield Farm produces goes into the cafeteria food system. Another 10% goes to the local food bank. This includes a variety of vegetables—squash, potatoes, corn, carrots, beets, turnips, kale, Swiss chard, spinach, bok choy, arugula, lettuce, tomatoes and cucumbers—and meat, including three hundred chickens, all the eggs they lay, as well as 30 turkeys that come to the table as a pre-Thanksgiving dinner for the students.

[caption id="attachment_2991" align="alignnone" width="540"]Students of The Hotchkiss School working with Charlie Noyes in the fields at Fairfield Farm. Photo by Jonathan Doster. Students of The Hotchkiss School working with Charles Noyes in the fields at Fairfield Farm. Photo by Jonathan Doster.[/caption]

Stewardship and Mentorship

Kurt pointed out to me that if it hadn’t been for the stewardship of Allen Cockerline, owner of the all-organic Whippoorwill Farm, a close neighbor to The Hotchkiss School, they wouldn’t have the beef cattle that he pastures at Fairfield Farm, or the mentorship he’s provided. Charles Noyes, an instructor of art at the school for twenty-five years, as well as an enthusiastic alumnus, is now also head of the Ffeat (Fairfield Farms Environmental and Adventure Farm) program initiated over five years ago. As hands-on Farm Curriculum Coordinator of the program, Charles also oversees twenty-four students who mend fences, clear trails, sow seeds, and harvest crops during the academic year.  They also join their supervisor once a month in the kitchen to create a dinner from the produce they have grown and the poultry they have raised.

A Living Laboratory for the Study of Agriculture and the Environment

It is a fortunate school that can claim the privilege of being a recipient of a million dollar grant for their science and math departments—as The Hotchkiss School can claim. But, it is even a more fortunate school that can claim it has a living laboratory for the study of agriculture. It is very fortunate students who have the opportunity to train in the husbandry of land and animals, learning the value of sustainability, the resourcefulness of small farm farming—the pleasures of reaping what you sow and of cooking what you reap.

Fairfield Farm has also provided a learning base for many disciplines at The Hotchkiss School.  As Joshua Hahn, the Assistant Head of Schools and Director of Environmental Initiatives, and a major force in incorporating the farm into the school curriculum, is quick to point out. Academic studies that use the farm property to teach include environmental science, nutrition, arts and literature. He says there are hundreds of students in the course of the school year who find the farm an outdoor classroom for their understanding of a diverse array of disciplines from biology to poetry.

[caption id="attachment_2992" align="alignnone" width="518"]Students harvesting delicata squash. Photo by Jonathan Doster. Hotchkiss School students harvesting Delicata squash. Photo by Jonathan Doster.[/caption]

One Small Farm at a Time

Everyone at The Hotchkiss School involved in Fairfield Farm recognizes the immense advantage this highly rated private school has in being able to encourage the quicksilver minds of its students to look beyond their textbooks and become advocates for local and organic agriculture.

It is clear to me that these same preparatory school students may well become the decision-makers of the future creating solutions for food sustainability and solving the problems of a changing environment that we cannot imagine today. As Joshua Hahn says, “We are teaching our students to solve problems and come up with solutions for the environment that adults have a hard time comprehending. They are having a direct experience applying what they’ve learned to finding those solutions.”  And in doing so, have an opportunity to change the world for the better one small farm at a time.

A Bientot,



P.S. This is the second of a three-part series on Farm to School programs. If you missed the first one, please see Farm to School: Not Just a Slogan."
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    string(9190) "I’ve followed the progress of a five-year old agricultural program at The Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut over the last few months. Brought to my attention by friends who live in the area, I see this school program as a companion story to the remarkable efforts going on in Vermont to bring farms to students in innovative ways.

[caption id="attachment_2988" align="alignnone" width="518"]Fairfield farm at Hotchkiss Aerial view of Fairfield Farm taken by Stefen Turner[/caption]

A Gift that has Changed the Way the School Thinks about Food Sustainability

When I met Kurt Hinck, lean and tan with a blond crew cut and a killer smile, he was about to spend his last summer at The Hotchkiss School, managing the all-organic Fairfield Farm. Two hundred and eighty acres of fields with three farmhouses, and a number of outbuildings and barns comprises the gift of Jack Blum, an alumnus, former trustee and past commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Agriculture, and his wife, Jan, given to the prestigious private school in Lakeville, Connecticut. It’s a gift that has changed the way the school thinks about food sustainability, while, at the same time, underscores the importance it places on the stewardship of the environment.

After Years of Being on Campus

Kurt joined the farm program in 2010 after years of being on campus as the son of employees and then as a student. The Hotchkiss School had been his world except for the four years he spent at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania. He was going to miss the rolling hills of Lakeville but he was also excited to fulfill a dream by joining the Officer Training Program of the United States Marine Corp.

[caption id="attachment_2989" align="alignnone" width="518"]Talking with me in the fields at Fairfield Farm, l to r: Kurt Hinck, Fairfield Farm Manager; Allen Cockerline, farm advisor,  student, and Charlie Noyes, Ffeat administrator at the Hotchkiss School. Photo by Tom Zetterstrom. Talking with me in the fields at Fairfield Farm, l to r: Kurt Hinck, Fairfield Farm manager; Allen Cockerline, farm advisor; student; and Charles Noyes, Ffeat administrator at The Hotchkiss School. Photo by Tom Zetterstrom.[/caption]

The Farm’s Accomplishments

In early September, as Kurt was traveling by train to New York City for a last Big City-break before joining the Marines, I talked to him, again, this time about the farm’s accomplishments over the summer. With the sound of the train’s wheels rolling along in the background, I heard his pride and pleasure in the way the summer program had worked. He was positive about the contribution the farm was making to The Hotchkiss School’s overall interest in the sciences and the environment. His mentorship of six summer student interns, four-days a week had turned out well.

He was also proud of the way the program has partnered with Food Services at the school. It’s a synergistic relationship. The seven pigs—now weighing three hundred pounds each—raised on the farm, are eating not only corn grown there but also the organic waste from The Hotchkiss School’s kitchens. Andrew Cox, formerly of the Harvard School of Government, now head of the Sodexo-managed school dining services as the Director of Sustainability, says that 90% of what Fairfield Farm produces goes into the cafeteria food system. Another 10% goes to the local food bank. This includes a variety of vegetables—squash, potatoes, corn, carrots, beets, turnips, kale, Swiss chard, spinach, bok choy, arugula, lettuce, tomatoes and cucumbers—and meat, including three hundred chickens, all the eggs they lay, as well as 30 turkeys that come to the table as a pre-Thanksgiving dinner for the students.

[caption id="attachment_2991" align="alignnone" width="540"]Students of The Hotchkiss School working with Charlie Noyes in the fields at Fairfield Farm. Photo by Jonathan Doster. Students of The Hotchkiss School working with Charles Noyes in the fields at Fairfield Farm. Photo by Jonathan Doster.[/caption]

Stewardship and Mentorship

Kurt pointed out to me that if it hadn’t been for the stewardship of Allen Cockerline, owner of the all-organic Whippoorwill Farm, a close neighbor to The Hotchkiss School, they wouldn’t have the beef cattle that he pastures at Fairfield Farm, or the mentorship he’s provided. Charles Noyes, an instructor of art at the school for twenty-five years, as well as an enthusiastic alumnus, is now also head of the Ffeat (Fairfield Farms Environmental and Adventure Farm) program initiated over five years ago. As hands-on Farm Curriculum Coordinator of the program, Charles also oversees twenty-four students who mend fences, clear trails, sow seeds, and harvest crops during the academic year.  They also join their supervisor once a month in the kitchen to create a dinner from the produce they have grown and the poultry they have raised.

A Living Laboratory for the Study of Agriculture and the Environment

It is a fortunate school that can claim the privilege of being a recipient of a million dollar grant for their science and math departments—as The Hotchkiss School can claim. But, it is even a more fortunate school that can claim it has a living laboratory for the study of agriculture. It is very fortunate students who have the opportunity to train in the husbandry of land and animals, learning the value of sustainability, the resourcefulness of small farm farming—the pleasures of reaping what you sow and of cooking what you reap.

Fairfield Farm has also provided a learning base for many disciplines at The Hotchkiss School.  As Joshua Hahn, the Assistant Head of Schools and Director of Environmental Initiatives, and a major force in incorporating the farm into the school curriculum, is quick to point out. Academic studies that use the farm property to teach include environmental science, nutrition, arts and literature. He says there are hundreds of students in the course of the school year who find the farm an outdoor classroom for their understanding of a diverse array of disciplines from biology to poetry.

[caption id="attachment_2992" align="alignnone" width="518"]Students harvesting delicata squash. Photo by Jonathan Doster. Hotchkiss School students harvesting Delicata squash. Photo by Jonathan Doster.[/caption]

One Small Farm at a Time

Everyone at The Hotchkiss School involved in Fairfield Farm recognizes the immense advantage this highly rated private school has in being able to encourage the quicksilver minds of its students to look beyond their textbooks and become advocates for local and organic agriculture.

It is clear to me that these same preparatory school students may well become the decision-makers of the future creating solutions for food sustainability and solving the problems of a changing environment that we cannot imagine today. As Joshua Hahn says, “We are teaching our students to solve problems and come up with solutions for the environment that adults have a hard time comprehending. They are having a direct experience applying what they’ve learned to finding those solutions.”  And in doing so, have an opportunity to change the world for the better one small farm at a time.

A Bientot,



P.S. This is the second of a three-part series on Farm to School programs. If you missed the first one, please see Farm to School: Not Just a Slogan."
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7 responses to “Fairfield Farm at The Hotchkiss School: Where Academics & Agriculture Meet”

  1. Fascinating to learn of these efforts at Hotchkiss!

    It’s encouraging to see some of the finest secondary schools in the country begin to embrace local food systems, and honor the place of sustainable agriculture in our society.

    -Tim Patterson
    Director of Admission at Sterling College, Craftsbury, VT

  2. Thanks for this Bronwyn! Only your ever-curious nature would have brought this to my attention! Best, CF

  3. Thank you both, Tim and Christine. I’m lucky to have so many interesting friends -one conversation leads to another and I find myself pursuing my love of food and farms once, again!

  4. Will Bailey says:

    It seems appropriate that since New England was where agriculture started (1600’s), that New England would be the place where new ideas and directions in agriculture would take place. Also, Bronwyn this is very nicely written.

    Will Bailey
    Instructor, Lehman College, Bronx, NY

  5. Thank you so much, Will. Your opinion about my writing style is much appreciated!

  6. […] to School – Not Just a Slogan published on Oct 5, 2013Fairfield Farm at The Hotchkiss School: Where Academics & Agriculture Meet , published on Oct 18, […]

  7. […] P.S. Be sure to read Farm to School: Not Just a Slogan and Fairfield Farm at The Hotchkiss School: Where Agriculture & Academics Meet.  […]

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