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I love quotes that add meaning to my life. Here are a few to live by:

We can dramatically increase global food availability and environmental sustainability by using more of our crops to feed people directly and less to fatten livestock.
—Jonathan A. Foley, director of the Institute on the Environment, U of MN

Don’t eat anything your great-grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food.
—Michael Pollan

Cooking is at once child’s play and adult joy. And cooking done with care is an act of love.
—Craig Claiborne

People who eat according to the rules of a traditional food culture are generally healthier than those of us eating a modern Western diet of processed food.
—Michael Pollan

Making Fresh Mozzarella

By Lisa Farrell

Collage w caption

What is better than eating a homegrown tomato in the middle of August? I think it’s having homemade mozzarella cheese to accompany this special summer flavor. Please enjoy my friend Lisa Farrell’s “Spoon Fed Story” about our experience making mozzarella. —Bronwyn

In summer I could exist solely on fresh mozzarella, vine-ripened tomatoes, and plucked-from-the-bush basil. I can’t get enough of that exquisite combo.

So when a class about making fresh mozzarella was offered through City Market in South Burlington, Vermont, Bronwyn and I quickly signed up. Thanks to Lindsay Harris from Family Cow Farmstand in Hinesburg, the class was both informative and fun. She taught us how to make mozzarella from raw milk using the fresh, golden liquid from her own Guernseys. Lindsay made the steps look simple and foolproof: her mozzarella was beautiful and delicious.

A few weeks later, Bronwyn and I made our own batch using milk from Lindsay’s cows. Mozzarella ingredients are pretty basic: milk, citric acid, rennet, salt, and water. You’ll also need a good thermometer that measures between 90 and 130 degrees Fahrenheit. Although the steps are simple, temperature and timing may vary based on a dozen factors. Therein lies the challenge —and magic—of seeing milk become mozzarella. Ours didn’t look or taste quite like Lindsay’s, but it was good nevertheless.

I’m hooked on making fresh mozzarella. If only I could make those tomatoes ripen quicker…

See the fresh mozzarella recipe here >

Posted: 7-27-2013

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What is better than eating a homegrown tomato in the middle of August? I think it’s having homemade mozzarella cheese to accompany this special summer flavor. Please enjoy my friend Lisa Farrell’s "Spoon Fed Story" about our experience making mozzarella. —Bronwyn

In summer I could exist solely on fresh mozzarella, vine-ripened tomatoes, and plucked-from-the-bush basil. I can't get enough of that exquisite combo.

So when a class about making fresh mozzarella was offered through City Market in South Burlington, Vermont, Bronwyn and I quickly signed up. Thanks to Lindsay Harris from Family Cow Farmstand in Hinesburg, the class was both informative and fun. She taught us how to make mozzarella from raw milk using the fresh, golden liquid from her own Guernseys. Lindsay made the steps look simple and foolproof: her mozzarella was beautiful and delicious.

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I'm hooked on making fresh mozzarella. If only I could make those tomatoes ripen quicker...

See the fresh mozzarella recipe here >
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What is better than eating a homegrown tomato in the middle of August? I think it’s having homemade mozzarella cheese to accompany this special summer flavor. Please enjoy my friend Lisa Farrell’s "Spoon Fed Story" about our experience making mozzarella. —Bronwyn

In summer I could exist solely on fresh mozzarella, vine-ripened tomatoes, and plucked-from-the-bush basil. I can't get enough of that exquisite combo.

So when a class about making fresh mozzarella was offered through City Market in South Burlington, Vermont, Bronwyn and I quickly signed up. Thanks to Lindsay Harris from Family Cow Farmstand in Hinesburg, the class was both informative and fun. She taught us how to make mozzarella from raw milk using the fresh, golden liquid from her own Guernseys. Lindsay made the steps look simple and foolproof: her mozzarella was beautiful and delicious.

A few weeks later, Bronwyn and I made our own batch using milk from Lindsay's cows. Mozzarella ingredients are pretty basic: milk, citric acid, rennet, salt, and water. You'll also need a good thermometer that measures between 90 and 130 degrees Fahrenheit. Although the steps are simple, temperature and timing may vary based on a dozen factors. Therein lies the challenge —and magic—of seeing milk become mozzarella. Ours didn't look or taste quite like Lindsay's, but it was good nevertheless.

I'm hooked on making fresh mozzarella. If only I could make those tomatoes ripen quicker...

See the fresh mozzarella recipe here >
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What is better than eating a homegrown tomato in the middle of August? I think it’s having homemade mozzarella cheese to accompany this special summer flavor. Please enjoy my friend Lisa Farrell’s "Spoon Fed Story" about our experience making mozzarella. —Bronwyn

In summer I could exist solely on fresh mozzarella, vine-ripened tomatoes, and plucked-from-the-bush basil. I can't get enough of that exquisite combo.

So when a class about making fresh mozzarella was offered through City Market in South Burlington, Vermont, Bronwyn and I quickly signed up. Thanks to Lindsay Harris from Family Cow Farmstand in Hinesburg, the class was both informative and fun. She taught us how to make mozzarella from raw milk using the fresh, golden liquid from her own Guernseys. Lindsay made the steps look simple and foolproof: her mozzarella was beautiful and delicious.

A few weeks later, Bronwyn and I made our own batch using milk from Lindsay's cows. Mozzarella ingredients are pretty basic: milk, citric acid, rennet, salt, and water. You'll also need a good thermometer that measures between 90 and 130 degrees Fahrenheit. Although the steps are simple, temperature and timing may vary based on a dozen factors. Therein lies the challenge —and magic—of seeing milk become mozzarella. Ours didn't look or taste quite like Lindsay's, but it was good nevertheless.

I'm hooked on making fresh mozzarella. If only I could make those tomatoes ripen quicker...

See the fresh mozzarella recipe here >
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4 Responses to “Making Fresh Mozzarella”

  1. […] My good friend, Lisa Farrell, and I spent a lazy Sunday afternoon making mozzarella cheese in my kitchen, using raw milk from Family Cow Farmstand, after having attended a workshop led by Lindsay. We felt confident that we could master the technique. To our surprise, it was even easier than it looked! Read Lisa’s Spoon Fed Story here. […]

  2. EM says:

    I love mozzarella and even though I live in Paris and can buy great cheese here, I’m going to try to make my own. I’m an artist and even if it doesn’t taste Italian or Vermontian, I’m sure it’ll be interesting. Thanks for the recipe!

  3. Will Bailey says:

    I enjoyed reading this for several reasons:
    1. I see how being in Vermont opens a person up to people that have mastered the art of living off the land. The milk farm, and doing your own cheese.
    2. This way of living is not a hobby or after thought it’s a way of looking at living that is fresh and grounded.
    3. It always seems that you are eating food that looks fun to make, looks good to eat and I know tastes better than any restaurant or store bought food in the lower 48.

  4. Bronwyn says:

    These are more than kind words about Vermont. I feel so lucky to live here. Thank you, Will!

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