A culinary online center dedicated to promoting the importance and the joy of American home cooking with an emphasis on local products and talent, celebrating the unique spirit and energy of the new food world ethos, especially in Vermont.

amuse bouche

I love quotes that add meaning to my life. Here are a few to live by:

We can dramatically increase global food availability and environmental sustainability by using more of our crops to feed people directly and less to fatten livestock.
—Jonathan A. Foley, director of the Institute on the Environment, U of MN

Don’t eat anything your great-grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food.
—Michael Pollan

Cooking is at once child’s play and adult joy. And cooking done with care is an act of love.
—Craig Claiborne

People who eat according to the rules of a traditional food culture are generally healthier than those of us eating a modern Western diet of processed food.
—Michael Pollan

Onion Soup for the Soul

It’s that time of year, where everyone you know is either sick, getting sick, getting over being sick, or getting you sick.  At least the weather matches the mood; today’s forecast: freezing rain!

Nothing battles dreary days and dripping noses like hot, savory soup, especially when prepared and enjoyed in the company of good friends.  I had a date to make homemade French Onion Soup with dear friends Bronwyn & Laurie.  Disappointingly, but  not surprisingly, we were all under the weather and had to reschedule!  Those two are soon headed to the Southwest to enjoy sun-soaked days, so I decided to cook up soul-warming soup solo.

Besides the obvious star of the dish, onion, the key ingredient to French Onion Soup is the broth.  Traditionally, French Onioin Soup is made with beef stock.  However, having recently enjoyed some hearty lamb chops, I decided to make a rich lamb stock.  (Curious readers should check out this article for more information on the difference between stock and broth.)

My favorite way to make stock (or “bone broth”), is to place bones in a slow cooker with any or all of the following: onion, celery, and/or carrot.  I also like to add a seasoning satchel.  For this instance, I used bay leaves and oregano.  Add a couple tablespoons of Apple Cider Vinegar, fill with water, and slow cook on low for 12-24 hours.  Stock is almost impossible to overcook, and time is your friend. The long, slow, cooking process allows the collagen in the bones to break down, which is what we want!  Collagen is great for your nails, hair, and bones, plus is an extra boost of easily digested protein – all good things!

The following recipe is adapted from the Classic French Onion Soup recipe from the Taste of Home website.

Ingredients:

3 Tbsp olive oil

1 Tbsp butter

2 lb onion

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 c. red wine

2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar

48 oz lamb or beef stock

Salt and pepper to taste

1 red potato sliced into 1/4″ rounds – or – 12 1/2″ slices French bread baguette

2 cloves garlic, sliced in half

3/4 c. shredded Gruyere cheese

Method:

Heat 1/2 the olive oil and butter in thick bottomed pot/dutch oven.  Add onions and cook, stirring often, until tender (about 12 minutes).  Reduce heat to medium-low and cook until deep golden brown (about 45-60 minutes), stirring occasionally.

Add minced garlic and stir for another two minutes.  Add wine and balsamic.  Bring to a boil and cook until liquid is reduced to half.  Add stock, salt, and pepper.  Return to a boil.  Reduce heat and simmer, covered, stirring occasionally, for ~1 hour.

Meanwhile, use remaining olive oil and garlic to either pan fry potato or toast.  Put soup in oven safe bowls, top with potato (or bread) and sprinkle with shredded Gruyere cheese.  Broil until melted. Enjoy!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

Posted: 3-10-2019

object(WP_Query)#941 (51) {
  ["query_vars"]=>
  array(65) {
    ["page"]=>
    int(0)
    ["name"]=>
    string(23) "onion-soup-for-the-soul"
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["error"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["m"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["p"]=>
    int(0)
    ["post_parent"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["static"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["pagename"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["page_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["second"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["minute"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["hour"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["day"]=>
    int(0)
    ["monthnum"]=>
    int(0)
    ["year"]=>
    int(0)
    ["w"]=>
    int(0)
    ["tag"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["cat"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["tag_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author_name"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["feed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["tb"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["paged"]=>
    int(0)
    ["meta_key"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["meta_value"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["preview"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["s"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["sentence"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["title"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["fields"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["menu_order"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["embed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["category__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_name__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["ignore_sticky_posts"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["suppress_filters"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["cache_results"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_term_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["lazy_load_term_meta"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_meta_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["post_type"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["posts_per_page"]=>
    int(5)
    ["nopaging"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["comments_per_page"]=>
    string(2) "50"
    ["no_found_rows"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["order"]=>
    string(4) "DESC"
  }
  ["tax_query"]=>
  NULL
  ["meta_query"]=>
  object(WP_Meta_Query)#375 (9) {
    ["queries"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["relation"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["table_aliases:protected"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["clauses:protected"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["has_or_relation:protected"]=>
    bool(false)
  }
  ["date_query"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["post_count"]=>
  int(1)
  ["current_post"]=>
  int(0)
  ["in_the_loop"]=>
  bool(true)
  ["comment_count"]=>
  int(0)
  ["current_comment"]=>
  int(-1)
  ["found_posts"]=>
  int(1)
  ["max_num_pages"]=>
  int(0)
  ["max_num_comment_pages"]=>
  int(0)
  ["is_single"]=>
  bool(true)
  ["is_preview"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_page"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_archive"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_date"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_year"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_month"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_day"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_time"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_author"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_category"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_tag"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_tax"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_search"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_feed"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_comment_feed"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_trackback"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_home"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_404"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_embed"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_paged"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_admin"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_attachment"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_singular"]=>
  bool(true)
  ["is_robots"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_posts_page"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_post_type_archive"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["query_vars_hash:private"]=>
  string(32) "fab6ff6c3059928082f6c737fea7efa4"
  ["query_vars_changed:private"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["thumbnails_cached"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["stopwords:private"]=>
  NULL
  ["compat_fields:private"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(15) "query_vars_hash"
    [1]=>
    string(18) "query_vars_changed"
  }
  ["compat_methods:private"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(16) "init_query_flags"
    [1]=>
    string(15) "parse_tax_query"
  }
  ["query"]=>
  array(3) {
    ["page"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["name"]=>
    string(23) "onion-soup-for-the-soul"
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
  }
  ["request"]=>
  string(163) "SELECT   wp_posts.* FROM wp_posts  WHERE 1=1  AND wp_posts.post_name = 'onion-soup-for-the-soul' AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post'  ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC "
  ["posts"]=>
  &array(1) {
    [0]=>
    object(WP_Post)#373 (24) {
      ["ID"]=>
      int(5070)
      ["post_author"]=>
      string(1) "8"
      ["post_date"]=>
      string(19) "2019-03-10 20:56:53"
      ["post_date_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-03-11 00:56:53"
      ["post_content"]=>
      string(4306) "It's that time of year, where everyone you know is either sick, getting sick, getting over being sick, or getting you sick.  At least the weather matches the mood; today's forecast: freezing rain!

Nothing battles dreary days and dripping noses like hot, savory soup, especially when prepared and enjoyed in the company of good friends.  I had a date to make homemade French Onion Soup with dear friends Bronwyn & Laurie.  Disappointingly, but  not surprisingly, we were all under the weather and had to reschedule!  Those two are soon headed to the Southwest to enjoy sun-soaked days, so I decided to cook up soul-warming soup solo.



Besides the obvious star of the dish, onion, the key ingredient to French Onion Soup is the broth.  Traditionally, French Onioin Soup is made with beef stock.  However, having recently enjoyed some hearty lamb chops, I decided to make a rich lamb stock.  (Curious readers should check out this article for more information on the difference between stock and broth.)



My favorite way to make stock (or "bone broth"), is to place bones in a slow cooker with any or all of the following: onion, celery, and/or carrot.  I also like to add a seasoning satchel.  For this instance, I used bay leaves and oregano.  Add a couple tablespoons of Apple Cider Vinegar, fill with water, and slow cook on low for 12-24 hours.  Stock is almost impossible to overcook, and time is your friend. The long, slow, cooking process allows the collagen in the bones to break down, which is what we want!  Collagen is great for your nails, hair, and bones, plus is an extra boost of easily digested protein - all good things!



The following recipe is adapted from the Classic French Onion Soup recipe from the Taste of Home website.

Ingredients:

3 Tbsp olive oil

1 Tbsp butter

2 lb onion

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 c. red wine

2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar

48 oz lamb or beef stock

Salt and pepper to taste

1 red potato sliced into 1/4" rounds - or - 12 1/2" slices French bread baguette

2 cloves garlic, sliced in half

3/4 c. shredded Gruyere cheese



Method:

Heat 1/2 the olive oil and butter in thick bottomed pot/dutch oven.  Add onions and cook, stirring often, until tender (about 12 minutes).  Reduce heat to medium-low and cook until deep golden brown (about 45-60 minutes), stirring occasionally.

Add minced garlic and stir for another two minutes.  Add wine and balsamic.  Bring to a boil and cook until liquid is reduced to half.  Add stock, salt, and pepper.  Return to a boil.  Reduce heat and simmer, covered, stirring occasionally, for ~1 hour.

Meanwhile, use remaining olive oil and garlic to either pan fry potato or toast.  Put soup in oven safe bowls, top with potato (or bread) and sprinkle with shredded Gruyere cheese.  Broil until melted. Enjoy!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin"
      ["post_title"]=>
      string(23) "Onion Soup for the Soul"
      ["post_excerpt"]=>
      string(203) "Fight the winter blues with hearty homemade French Onion Soup. Follow the classic recipe, or join me with a creative spin by using lamb stock and going gluten free (I subbed potato for the bread!).  YUM!"
      ["post_status"]=>
      string(7) "publish"
      ["comment_status"]=>
      string(4) "open"
      ["ping_status"]=>
      string(4) "open"
      ["post_password"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_name"]=>
      string(23) "onion-soup-for-the-soul"
      ["to_ping"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["pinged"]=>
      string(78) "
http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/recipes/three-uses-for-a-bounty-of-apples/"
      ["post_modified"]=>
      string(19) "2019-03-11 10:12:55"
      ["post_modified_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-03-11 14:12:55"
      ["post_content_filtered"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_parent"]=>
      int(0)
      ["guid"]=>
      string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5070"
      ["menu_order"]=>
      int(0)
      ["post_type"]=>
      string(4) "post"
      ["post_mime_type"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["comment_count"]=>
      string(1) "2"
      ["filter"]=>
      string(3) "raw"
    }
  }
  ["post"]=>
  object(WP_Post)#373 (24) {
    ["ID"]=>
    int(5070)
    ["post_author"]=>
    string(1) "8"
    ["post_date"]=>
    string(19) "2019-03-10 20:56:53"
    ["post_date_gmt"]=>
    string(19) "2019-03-11 00:56:53"
    ["post_content"]=>
    string(4306) "It's that time of year, where everyone you know is either sick, getting sick, getting over being sick, or getting you sick.  At least the weather matches the mood; today's forecast: freezing rain!

Nothing battles dreary days and dripping noses like hot, savory soup, especially when prepared and enjoyed in the company of good friends.  I had a date to make homemade French Onion Soup with dear friends Bronwyn & Laurie.  Disappointingly, but  not surprisingly, we were all under the weather and had to reschedule!  Those two are soon headed to the Southwest to enjoy sun-soaked days, so I decided to cook up soul-warming soup solo.



Besides the obvious star of the dish, onion, the key ingredient to French Onion Soup is the broth.  Traditionally, French Onioin Soup is made with beef stock.  However, having recently enjoyed some hearty lamb chops, I decided to make a rich lamb stock.  (Curious readers should check out this article for more information on the difference between stock and broth.)



My favorite way to make stock (or "bone broth"), is to place bones in a slow cooker with any or all of the following: onion, celery, and/or carrot.  I also like to add a seasoning satchel.  For this instance, I used bay leaves and oregano.  Add a couple tablespoons of Apple Cider Vinegar, fill with water, and slow cook on low for 12-24 hours.  Stock is almost impossible to overcook, and time is your friend. The long, slow, cooking process allows the collagen in the bones to break down, which is what we want!  Collagen is great for your nails, hair, and bones, plus is an extra boost of easily digested protein - all good things!



The following recipe is adapted from the Classic French Onion Soup recipe from the Taste of Home website.

Ingredients:

3 Tbsp olive oil

1 Tbsp butter

2 lb onion

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 c. red wine

2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar

48 oz lamb or beef stock

Salt and pepper to taste

1 red potato sliced into 1/4" rounds - or - 12 1/2" slices French bread baguette

2 cloves garlic, sliced in half

3/4 c. shredded Gruyere cheese



Method:

Heat 1/2 the olive oil and butter in thick bottomed pot/dutch oven.  Add onions and cook, stirring often, until tender (about 12 minutes).  Reduce heat to medium-low and cook until deep golden brown (about 45-60 minutes), stirring occasionally.

Add minced garlic and stir for another two minutes.  Add wine and balsamic.  Bring to a boil and cook until liquid is reduced to half.  Add stock, salt, and pepper.  Return to a boil.  Reduce heat and simmer, covered, stirring occasionally, for ~1 hour.

Meanwhile, use remaining olive oil and garlic to either pan fry potato or toast.  Put soup in oven safe bowls, top with potato (or bread) and sprinkle with shredded Gruyere cheese.  Broil until melted. Enjoy!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin"
    ["post_title"]=>
    string(23) "Onion Soup for the Soul"
    ["post_excerpt"]=>
    string(203) "Fight the winter blues with hearty homemade French Onion Soup. Follow the classic recipe, or join me with a creative spin by using lamb stock and going gluten free (I subbed potato for the bread!).  YUM!"
    ["post_status"]=>
    string(7) "publish"
    ["comment_status"]=>
    string(4) "open"
    ["ping_status"]=>
    string(4) "open"
    ["post_password"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["post_name"]=>
    string(23) "onion-soup-for-the-soul"
    ["to_ping"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["pinged"]=>
    string(78) "
http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/recipes/three-uses-for-a-bounty-of-apples/"
    ["post_modified"]=>
    string(19) "2019-03-11 10:12:55"
    ["post_modified_gmt"]=>
    string(19) "2019-03-11 14:12:55"
    ["post_content_filtered"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["post_parent"]=>
    int(0)
    ["guid"]=>
    string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5070"
    ["menu_order"]=>
    int(0)
    ["post_type"]=>
    string(4) "post"
    ["post_mime_type"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["comment_count"]=>
    string(1) "2"
    ["filter"]=>
    string(3) "raw"
  }
  ["queried_object"]=>
  object(WP_Post)#373 (24) {
    ["ID"]=>
    int(5070)
    ["post_author"]=>
    string(1) "8"
    ["post_date"]=>
    string(19) "2019-03-10 20:56:53"
    ["post_date_gmt"]=>
    string(19) "2019-03-11 00:56:53"
    ["post_content"]=>
    string(4306) "It's that time of year, where everyone you know is either sick, getting sick, getting over being sick, or getting you sick.  At least the weather matches the mood; today's forecast: freezing rain!

Nothing battles dreary days and dripping noses like hot, savory soup, especially when prepared and enjoyed in the company of good friends.  I had a date to make homemade French Onion Soup with dear friends Bronwyn & Laurie.  Disappointingly, but  not surprisingly, we were all under the weather and had to reschedule!  Those two are soon headed to the Southwest to enjoy sun-soaked days, so I decided to cook up soul-warming soup solo.



Besides the obvious star of the dish, onion, the key ingredient to French Onion Soup is the broth.  Traditionally, French Onioin Soup is made with beef stock.  However, having recently enjoyed some hearty lamb chops, I decided to make a rich lamb stock.  (Curious readers should check out this article for more information on the difference between stock and broth.)



My favorite way to make stock (or "bone broth"), is to place bones in a slow cooker with any or all of the following: onion, celery, and/or carrot.  I also like to add a seasoning satchel.  For this instance, I used bay leaves and oregano.  Add a couple tablespoons of Apple Cider Vinegar, fill with water, and slow cook on low for 12-24 hours.  Stock is almost impossible to overcook, and time is your friend. The long, slow, cooking process allows the collagen in the bones to break down, which is what we want!  Collagen is great for your nails, hair, and bones, plus is an extra boost of easily digested protein - all good things!



The following recipe is adapted from the Classic French Onion Soup recipe from the Taste of Home website.

Ingredients:

3 Tbsp olive oil

1 Tbsp butter

2 lb onion

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 c. red wine

2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar

48 oz lamb or beef stock

Salt and pepper to taste

1 red potato sliced into 1/4" rounds - or - 12 1/2" slices French bread baguette

2 cloves garlic, sliced in half

3/4 c. shredded Gruyere cheese



Method:

Heat 1/2 the olive oil and butter in thick bottomed pot/dutch oven.  Add onions and cook, stirring often, until tender (about 12 minutes).  Reduce heat to medium-low and cook until deep golden brown (about 45-60 minutes), stirring occasionally.

Add minced garlic and stir for another two minutes.  Add wine and balsamic.  Bring to a boil and cook until liquid is reduced to half.  Add stock, salt, and pepper.  Return to a boil.  Reduce heat and simmer, covered, stirring occasionally, for ~1 hour.

Meanwhile, use remaining olive oil and garlic to either pan fry potato or toast.  Put soup in oven safe bowls, top with potato (or bread) and sprinkle with shredded Gruyere cheese.  Broil until melted. Enjoy!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin"
    ["post_title"]=>
    string(23) "Onion Soup for the Soul"
    ["post_excerpt"]=>
    string(203) "Fight the winter blues with hearty homemade French Onion Soup. Follow the classic recipe, or join me with a creative spin by using lamb stock and going gluten free (I subbed potato for the bread!).  YUM!"
    ["post_status"]=>
    string(7) "publish"
    ["comment_status"]=>
    string(4) "open"
    ["ping_status"]=>
    string(4) "open"
    ["post_password"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["post_name"]=>
    string(23) "onion-soup-for-the-soul"
    ["to_ping"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["pinged"]=>
    string(78) "
http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/recipes/three-uses-for-a-bounty-of-apples/"
    ["post_modified"]=>
    string(19) "2019-03-11 10:12:55"
    ["post_modified_gmt"]=>
    string(19) "2019-03-11 14:12:55"
    ["post_content_filtered"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["post_parent"]=>
    int(0)
    ["guid"]=>
    string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5070"
    ["menu_order"]=>
    int(0)
    ["post_type"]=>
    string(4) "post"
    ["post_mime_type"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["comment_count"]=>
    string(1) "2"
    ["filter"]=>
    string(3) "raw"
  }
  ["queried_object_id"]=>
  int(5070)
}
SUBSCRIBE TO THIS BLOG’S FEED

2 responses to “Onion Soup for the Soul”

  1. Connie says:

    Brilliant! I love onion soup.This recipe was great.I have a gluten allergy and never heard of using sliced potatoes for the topping. Also, I am racing out to the butcher’s to get some bones to make the broth.Another winner suggestion.Thank you.

    • Corrie Austin says:

      Hello Connie,
      I am so glad to hear you were inspired! You will have to let us know how it turns out. We have a tremendous amount of leftovers, and I poached some of our fresh duck eggs in some leftovers this morning and served over wilted spinach. Yummy!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


 

flickrinejoin

TASTY PICKS

Good Food & Noteworthy Businesses

Hardwick Beef Ad #2

 


a La Carte Videos

Bronwyn Dunne and Judith Jones Prepare Two Potato Salads at Bryn Teg. See the recipes


Gateau de Crepes- In Molly’s Kitchen.
See recipe from the Smitten Kitchen



Blog Archives

Recipe Archives

  • Three New Must-Haves For Your Spice Cabinet - Jul 2019
  • Unagi – Preparation and Serving Suggestions - Jun 2019
  • Go Bananas at Burlington Farmer’s Market - May 2019
  • Gluten Free Banana Oatmeal Pancakes - May 2019
  • A Love Affair with Fermented Fare - Mar 2019
  • Strong Hands + Patience: Recipes for Home Fermenting - Jan 2019
  • Muffins posing as cupcakes - Dec 2018
  • ‘Tis the Season - Dec 2018
  • Four Things I learned in Cooking Class - Oct 2018
  • Moussaka - Oct 2018
  • I Love Early Fall…From My Head…To-ma-toes - Sep 2018
  • Three uses for a bounty of apples - Aug 2018
  • Strawberry Rhubarb Salsa - Jul 2018
  • Egg White Casserole with Sweet Potato Crust - Apr 2018
  • Chicken Dijonaise – Slow Cooker: The Best Cookbook Ever - Feb 2018
  • Winter Root Soup – Nourishing Traditions - Feb 2018
  • Soooo Many Momos - Sep 2017
  • SautĂ©ed Fiddleheads in Butter with Lemon and Garlic - May 2017
  • A Recipe for the Holidays from Shelburne Farms - Nov 2013
  • The “Zetterburger” Recipe - Aug 2013
  • Homemade Fresh Mozzarella Recipe - Jul 2013
  • Twin Farms’ Gluten-Free SoufflĂ© Pancake Recipe - Jun 2013
  • Potato Salad Two Ways - Mar 2013
  • It’s Easy Being Green—If You’re a Soup! - Feb 2013
  • For The Love of Valentine’s Day, A Chocolate Mousse - Feb 2013
  • Happy New Year Resolutions – Roasted Root Vegetables - Jan 2013
  • The Best Cheesecake in the World - Dec 2012
  • Tarte aux Pommes – A Holiday Gift to You - Dec 2012
  • A Thanksgiving Memory with a Memorable Brining Recipe - Nov 2012
  • Chicken with Artichokes & Honey – The Recipe - Nov 2012
  • Alison Baker’s Tomato Coconut Soup - Oct 2012
  • Basil, Lettuce and Tomato Sandwich – The Recipe - Oct 2012
  • Cold Pea Soup- The Recipe - Sep 2012
  • Onion Tart with Anchovies & Black Olives- Recipe for Pissaladiere Nicoise - Sep 2012
  • Boeuf Bourguignon - Apr 2012
  • Gingery Shrimp with Asparagus and Edamame - Apr 2012
  • Salisbury Steak - Apr 2012