A culinary online center dedicated to promoting the importance and the joy of American home cooking with an emphasis on local products and talent, celebrating the unique spirit and energy of the new food world ethos, especially in Vermont.

amuse bouche

I love quotes that add meaning to my life. Here are a few to live by:

We can dramatically increase global food availability and environmental sustainability by using more of our crops to feed people directly and less to fatten livestock.
—Jonathan A. Foley, director of the Institute on the Environment, U of MN

Don’t eat anything your great-grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food.
—Michael Pollan

Cooking is at once child’s play and adult joy. And cooking done with care is an act of love.
—Craig Claiborne

People who eat according to the rules of a traditional food culture are generally healthier than those of us eating a modern Western diet of processed food.
—Michael Pollan

Some things you only need to do once

I am a huge fan of new experiences – but some experiences only need to happen once.  I would hate to discourage anyone from trying the following, and perhaps after some memory-numbing years have passed me by, I will come back for another try.  But for now, I can mark the box done and move on!

Let’s start at the beginning: one of my coworkers brought home-made pickled ramps (commonly called wild leeks) to a work potluck, and they were fantastic!  This peer of mine is a huge fan of wild-foraging and harvested the ramps himself.  Some time later, I was working on some mountain bike trails with Fellowship of the Wheel, and we uncovered tons and tons of ramps*!  I reeked of onion as I collected them in my jean pockets and my backpack in anticipation of a delicious preparation.

I listened to podcasts to pass the time while prepping the ramps – this was a Process with a capital “P.”  More than two hours later, I had a robust bowl of beautiful ramp bulbs.  With the encouragement of my coworker, I decided to roast them in olive oil, salt, and pepper.  I roasted them at 375 for ~45 mins. They turned a beautiful caramel color and made the house smell amazing. They taste fantastic, like if garlic and onion were to have a baby.

Well, my coworker also advised to eat them in modest portions, as ramps have a laxative effect.  I stored them in a jar in the fridge and tossed small handfuls into my morning scrambles.  I suffered with stomach cramps all week, stubbornly eating them, because I was determined not to waste 3 hours of my weekend preparing a failed dish!  Needless to say, I will not be preparing them in this fashion again.  Perhaps pickling is the ideal method: you eat 2-3 at a time and are good to go with no stomach issues.

That’s my very lovely, but VERY tiny, home-grown onion on the right; store-bought onion on the left for scale.

While on the topic of fails as pertains to plants in the onion family, I will also confess my fails as an onion gardener.  If you’ve got secrets for growing large organic onions, let me know!  My pathetic crop took up an astronomical amount of garden real estate, and my puny onions are the size of large blueberries.  Adding insult to injury, onions are quite inexpensive, and garden-grown onions are not noticeably more delicious than those at the store. Unless and until I have unlimited garden space and learn more tricks of the trade, I will allocate my garden to more fruitful produce.

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

*For those of you who are not turned off by my experience and curious to forage for ramps, THIS is a great resource.  They are prevalent in the spring and identifiable by their green leaves.  I was digging around in the dirt late August, which is how I was able to find the buried bulbs.

Posted: 9-3-2018

object(WP_Query)#941 (51) {
  ["query_vars"]=>
  array(65) {
    ["page"]=>
    int(0)
    ["name"]=>
    string(36) "some-things-you-only-need-to-do-once"
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["error"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["m"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["p"]=>
    int(0)
    ["post_parent"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["static"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["pagename"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["page_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["second"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["minute"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["hour"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["day"]=>
    int(0)
    ["monthnum"]=>
    int(0)
    ["year"]=>
    int(0)
    ["w"]=>
    int(0)
    ["tag"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["cat"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["tag_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author_name"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["feed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["tb"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["paged"]=>
    int(0)
    ["meta_key"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["meta_value"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["preview"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["s"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["sentence"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["title"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["fields"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["menu_order"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["embed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["category__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_name__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["ignore_sticky_posts"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["suppress_filters"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["cache_results"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_term_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["lazy_load_term_meta"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_meta_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["post_type"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["posts_per_page"]=>
    int(5)
    ["nopaging"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["comments_per_page"]=>
    string(2) "50"
    ["no_found_rows"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["order"]=>
    string(4) "DESC"
  }
  ["tax_query"]=>
  NULL
  ["meta_query"]=>
  object(WP_Meta_Query)#375 (9) {
    ["queries"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["relation"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["table_aliases:protected"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["clauses:protected"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["has_or_relation:protected"]=>
    bool(false)
  }
  ["date_query"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["post_count"]=>
  int(1)
  ["current_post"]=>
  int(0)
  ["in_the_loop"]=>
  bool(true)
  ["comment_count"]=>
  int(0)
  ["current_comment"]=>
  int(-1)
  ["found_posts"]=>
  int(1)
  ["max_num_pages"]=>
  int(0)
  ["max_num_comment_pages"]=>
  int(0)
  ["is_single"]=>
  bool(true)
  ["is_preview"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_page"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_archive"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_date"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_year"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_month"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_day"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_time"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_author"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_category"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_tag"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_tax"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_search"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_feed"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_comment_feed"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_trackback"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_home"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_404"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_embed"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_paged"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_admin"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_attachment"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_singular"]=>
  bool(true)
  ["is_robots"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_posts_page"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_post_type_archive"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["query_vars_hash:private"]=>
  string(32) "f5e3780c4a4a65ffb1c7fbfa64200d18"
  ["query_vars_changed:private"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["thumbnails_cached"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["stopwords:private"]=>
  NULL
  ["compat_fields:private"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(15) "query_vars_hash"
    [1]=>
    string(18) "query_vars_changed"
  }
  ["compat_methods:private"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(16) "init_query_flags"
    [1]=>
    string(15) "parse_tax_query"
  }
  ["query"]=>
  array(3) {
    ["page"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["name"]=>
    string(36) "some-things-you-only-need-to-do-once"
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
  }
  ["request"]=>
  string(176) "SELECT   wp_posts.* FROM wp_posts  WHERE 1=1  AND wp_posts.post_name = 'some-things-you-only-need-to-do-once' AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post'  ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC "
  ["posts"]=>
  &array(1) {
    [0]=>
    object(WP_Post)#373 (24) {
      ["ID"]=>
      int(4928)
      ["post_author"]=>
      string(1) "8"
      ["post_date"]=>
      string(19) "2018-09-03 14:00:50"
      ["post_date_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2018-09-03 18:00:50"
      ["post_content"]=>
      string(3980) "I am a huge fan of new experiences - but some experiences only need to happen once.  I would hate to discourage anyone from trying the following, and perhaps after some memory-numbing years have passed me by, I will come back for another try.  But for now, I can mark the box done and move on!



Let's start at the beginning: one of my coworkers brought home-made pickled ramps (commonly called wild leeks) to a work potluck, and they were fantastic!  This peer of mine is a huge fan of wild-foraging and harvested the ramps himself.  Some time later, I was working on some mountain bike trails with Fellowship of the Wheel, and we uncovered tons and tons of ramps*!  I reeked of onion as I collected them in my jean pockets and my backpack in anticipation of a delicious preparation.



I listened to podcasts to pass the time while prepping the ramps - this was a Process with a capital "P."  More than two hours later, I had a robust bowl of beautiful ramp bulbs.  With the encouragement of my coworker, I decided to roast them in olive oil, salt, and pepper.  I roasted them at 375 for ~45 mins. They turned a beautiful caramel color and made the house smell amazing. They taste fantastic, like if garlic and onion were to have a baby.



Well, my coworker also advised to eat them in modest portions, as ramps have a laxative effect.  I stored them in a jar in the fridge and tossed small handfuls into my morning scrambles.  I suffered with stomach cramps all week, stubbornly eating them, because I was determined not to waste 3 hours of my weekend preparing a failed dish!  Needless to say, I will not be preparing them in this fashion again.  Perhaps pickling is the ideal method: you eat 2-3 at a time and are good to go with no stomach issues.

[caption id="attachment_4935" align="aligncenter" width="520"] That's my very lovely, but VERY tiny, home-grown onion on the right; store-bought onion on the left for scale.[/caption]

While on the topic of fails as pertains to plants in the onion family, I will also confess my fails as an onion gardener.  If you've got secrets for growing large organic onions, let me know!  My pathetic crop took up an astronomical amount of garden real estate, and my puny onions are the size of large blueberries.  Adding insult to injury, onions are quite inexpensive, and garden-grown onions are not noticeably more delicious than those at the store. Unless and until I have unlimited garden space and learn more tricks of the trade, I will allocate my garden to more fruitful produce.

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

*For those of you who are not turned off by my experience and curious to forage for ramps, THIS is a great resource.  They are prevalent in the spring and identifiable by their green leaves.  I was digging around in the dirt late August, which is how I was able to find the buried bulbs."
      ["post_title"]=>
      string(36) "Some things you only need to do once"
      ["post_excerpt"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_status"]=>
      string(7) "publish"
      ["comment_status"]=>
      string(4) "open"
      ["ping_status"]=>
      string(4) "open"
      ["post_password"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_name"]=>
      string(36) "some-things-you-only-need-to-do-once"
      ["to_ping"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["pinged"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_modified"]=>
      string(19) "2018-09-03 10:38:41"
      ["post_modified_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2018-09-03 14:38:41"
      ["post_content_filtered"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_parent"]=>
      int(0)
      ["guid"]=>
      string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=4928"
      ["menu_order"]=>
      int(0)
      ["post_type"]=>
      string(4) "post"
      ["post_mime_type"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["comment_count"]=>
      string(1) "0"
      ["filter"]=>
      string(3) "raw"
    }
  }
  ["post"]=>
  object(WP_Post)#373 (24) {
    ["ID"]=>
    int(4928)
    ["post_author"]=>
    string(1) "8"
    ["post_date"]=>
    string(19) "2018-09-03 14:00:50"
    ["post_date_gmt"]=>
    string(19) "2018-09-03 18:00:50"
    ["post_content"]=>
    string(3980) "I am a huge fan of new experiences - but some experiences only need to happen once.  I would hate to discourage anyone from trying the following, and perhaps after some memory-numbing years have passed me by, I will come back for another try.  But for now, I can mark the box done and move on!



Let's start at the beginning: one of my coworkers brought home-made pickled ramps (commonly called wild leeks) to a work potluck, and they were fantastic!  This peer of mine is a huge fan of wild-foraging and harvested the ramps himself.  Some time later, I was working on some mountain bike trails with Fellowship of the Wheel, and we uncovered tons and tons of ramps*!  I reeked of onion as I collected them in my jean pockets and my backpack in anticipation of a delicious preparation.



I listened to podcasts to pass the time while prepping the ramps - this was a Process with a capital "P."  More than two hours later, I had a robust bowl of beautiful ramp bulbs.  With the encouragement of my coworker, I decided to roast them in olive oil, salt, and pepper.  I roasted them at 375 for ~45 mins. They turned a beautiful caramel color and made the house smell amazing. They taste fantastic, like if garlic and onion were to have a baby.



Well, my coworker also advised to eat them in modest portions, as ramps have a laxative effect.  I stored them in a jar in the fridge and tossed small handfuls into my morning scrambles.  I suffered with stomach cramps all week, stubbornly eating them, because I was determined not to waste 3 hours of my weekend preparing a failed dish!  Needless to say, I will not be preparing them in this fashion again.  Perhaps pickling is the ideal method: you eat 2-3 at a time and are good to go with no stomach issues.

[caption id="attachment_4935" align="aligncenter" width="520"] That's my very lovely, but VERY tiny, home-grown onion on the right; store-bought onion on the left for scale.[/caption]

While on the topic of fails as pertains to plants in the onion family, I will also confess my fails as an onion gardener.  If you've got secrets for growing large organic onions, let me know!  My pathetic crop took up an astronomical amount of garden real estate, and my puny onions are the size of large blueberries.  Adding insult to injury, onions are quite inexpensive, and garden-grown onions are not noticeably more delicious than those at the store. Unless and until I have unlimited garden space and learn more tricks of the trade, I will allocate my garden to more fruitful produce.

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

*For those of you who are not turned off by my experience and curious to forage for ramps, THIS is a great resource.  They are prevalent in the spring and identifiable by their green leaves.  I was digging around in the dirt late August, which is how I was able to find the buried bulbs."
    ["post_title"]=>
    string(36) "Some things you only need to do once"
    ["post_excerpt"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["post_status"]=>
    string(7) "publish"
    ["comment_status"]=>
    string(4) "open"
    ["ping_status"]=>
    string(4) "open"
    ["post_password"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["post_name"]=>
    string(36) "some-things-you-only-need-to-do-once"
    ["to_ping"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["pinged"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["post_modified"]=>
    string(19) "2018-09-03 10:38:41"
    ["post_modified_gmt"]=>
    string(19) "2018-09-03 14:38:41"
    ["post_content_filtered"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["post_parent"]=>
    int(0)
    ["guid"]=>
    string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=4928"
    ["menu_order"]=>
    int(0)
    ["post_type"]=>
    string(4) "post"
    ["post_mime_type"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["comment_count"]=>
    string(1) "0"
    ["filter"]=>
    string(3) "raw"
  }
  ["queried_object"]=>
  object(WP_Post)#373 (24) {
    ["ID"]=>
    int(4928)
    ["post_author"]=>
    string(1) "8"
    ["post_date"]=>
    string(19) "2018-09-03 14:00:50"
    ["post_date_gmt"]=>
    string(19) "2018-09-03 18:00:50"
    ["post_content"]=>
    string(3980) "I am a huge fan of new experiences - but some experiences only need to happen once.  I would hate to discourage anyone from trying the following, and perhaps after some memory-numbing years have passed me by, I will come back for another try.  But for now, I can mark the box done and move on!



Let's start at the beginning: one of my coworkers brought home-made pickled ramps (commonly called wild leeks) to a work potluck, and they were fantastic!  This peer of mine is a huge fan of wild-foraging and harvested the ramps himself.  Some time later, I was working on some mountain bike trails with Fellowship of the Wheel, and we uncovered tons and tons of ramps*!  I reeked of onion as I collected them in my jean pockets and my backpack in anticipation of a delicious preparation.



I listened to podcasts to pass the time while prepping the ramps - this was a Process with a capital "P."  More than two hours later, I had a robust bowl of beautiful ramp bulbs.  With the encouragement of my coworker, I decided to roast them in olive oil, salt, and pepper.  I roasted them at 375 for ~45 mins. They turned a beautiful caramel color and made the house smell amazing. They taste fantastic, like if garlic and onion were to have a baby.



Well, my coworker also advised to eat them in modest portions, as ramps have a laxative effect.  I stored them in a jar in the fridge and tossed small handfuls into my morning scrambles.  I suffered with stomach cramps all week, stubbornly eating them, because I was determined not to waste 3 hours of my weekend preparing a failed dish!  Needless to say, I will not be preparing them in this fashion again.  Perhaps pickling is the ideal method: you eat 2-3 at a time and are good to go with no stomach issues.

[caption id="attachment_4935" align="aligncenter" width="520"] That's my very lovely, but VERY tiny, home-grown onion on the right; store-bought onion on the left for scale.[/caption]

While on the topic of fails as pertains to plants in the onion family, I will also confess my fails as an onion gardener.  If you've got secrets for growing large organic onions, let me know!  My pathetic crop took up an astronomical amount of garden real estate, and my puny onions are the size of large blueberries.  Adding insult to injury, onions are quite inexpensive, and garden-grown onions are not noticeably more delicious than those at the store. Unless and until I have unlimited garden space and learn more tricks of the trade, I will allocate my garden to more fruitful produce.

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

*For those of you who are not turned off by my experience and curious to forage for ramps, THIS is a great resource.  They are prevalent in the spring and identifiable by their green leaves.  I was digging around in the dirt late August, which is how I was able to find the buried bulbs."
    ["post_title"]=>
    string(36) "Some things you only need to do once"
    ["post_excerpt"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["post_status"]=>
    string(7) "publish"
    ["comment_status"]=>
    string(4) "open"
    ["ping_status"]=>
    string(4) "open"
    ["post_password"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["post_name"]=>
    string(36) "some-things-you-only-need-to-do-once"
    ["to_ping"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["pinged"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["post_modified"]=>
    string(19) "2018-09-03 10:38:41"
    ["post_modified_gmt"]=>
    string(19) "2018-09-03 14:38:41"
    ["post_content_filtered"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["post_parent"]=>
    int(0)
    ["guid"]=>
    string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=4928"
    ["menu_order"]=>
    int(0)
    ["post_type"]=>
    string(4) "post"
    ["post_mime_type"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["comment_count"]=>
    string(1) "0"
    ["filter"]=>
    string(3) "raw"
  }
  ["queried_object_id"]=>
  int(4928)
}
SUBSCRIBE TO THIS BLOG’S FEED

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


 

flickrinejoin

TASTY PICKS

Good Food & Noteworthy Businesses

Hardwick Beef Ad #2

 


a La Carte Videos

Bronwyn Dunne and Judith Jones Prepare Two Potato Salads at Bryn Teg. See the recipes


Gateau de Crepes- In Molly’s Kitchen.
See recipe from the Smitten Kitchen



Blog Archives