A culinary online center dedicated to promoting the importance and the joy of American home cooking with an emphasis on local products and talent, celebrating the unique spirit and energy of the new food world ethos, especially in Vermont.

amuse bouche

I love quotes that add meaning to my life. Here are a few to live by:

Avoid food products containing ingredients that a third-grader cannot pronounce.
—Michael Pollan

Feeding nine billion people in a truly sustainable way will be one of the greatest challenges our civilization has had to confront. It will require the imagination, determination and hard work of countless people from all over the world. There is no time to lose.
—Jonathan A. Foley, director of the Institute on the Environment, U of MN

The surest way to capture the flavors, colors, and textures of a culture is by using authentic products.
—Lidia Bastianich, from Lidia’s Italian-American Kitchen

The most important habit you can develop is to taste as you are preparing something. Take a sample and taste it critically at different stages of the cooking, then correct the seasonings…
—Marion Cunningham, from Learning to Cook

Plant a vegetable garden if you have the space, a window box if you don’t.
—Michael Pollan

The Duck Whisperer

In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world.

door

Last winter I discovered something I’ve been captivated with ever since: duck & rice farming. In a beautiful expression of naturally symbiotic relationships, Erik, of Vermont Rice, has brought this ancient Japanese method to Vermont.  The mechanics are very simple: ducklings don’t eat rice, but they eat bugs! They also keep weeds from sprouting by paddling around the rice paddy and shoveling their bills along the bottom. Ever since hearing about Erik’s operation, I have been obsessed with seeing it in action; and last week, I finally did!

Close up

Erik happened upon rice farming after he realized the farm he bought was extremely wet. Eager to grow organically and sustainably, he went straight to the source: Japan. After numerous trips to Asia, Erik honed his duck-rice farming skills and has been modestly expanding since he began seven years ago. With the help of a couple of UVM student assistants, he now maintains five acres of rice paddies in a valley between the rolling hills of Monkton and Vergennes.  By digging a pond, Erik is able to moderate the water levels in his paddies and capitalize on the valley’s tendency to collect water.  Despite using ancient techniques, he uses modern machinery.  After recently investing in equipment only available in Japan, Erik would love to create a farming community of shared machinery and methods. A true visionary, he imagines a Vermont where more farmers begin using his system. Clearly passionate about his venture, he is not possessive of his knowledge or his equipment. 

ducks in paddy

Once the ducks are in the paddies, Erik and his team’s responsibilities are minimal until harvest: they ensure the paddies maintain proper water levels and the ducks are safe. New this year, they built a three-storied duck house as a safety feature for the ducks at night. Otherwise, nature does its work the way it does best: naturally!  The ecosystem of the paddies feeds the ducks, and the ducks protect the paddies.

tractor

To fill five acres starting from seed required 730 seedling trays, planted in 6 rows of low hoop houses spanning a space of 36’x56′. Using his new motorized Japanese transplanter and a partner to load seed trays, Erik was able to transform days of backbreaking work into a half-day ordeal. Clearly pleased with his new contraption, Erik hopped on and showed me the machine in action. Arguably, his favorite feature is the row marker, which drags a line through the ground next to the row being planted. On the next pass, by aligning a rod on the front of the tractor with the line on the ground, he easily creates perfectly spaced, evenly planted rows.

me

The ducks, though, are the real stars of the operation. Erik brought me to his paddies, and asked, “wanna see something cool?” Ummm…hell yes I do! Then he started singing. Yes – singing! The ducks immediately reacted. They flocked from across the paddy, squirming each other out of the way as they fought to get out of the water to follow him. It was like Snow White’s singing luring little forest creatures; except Erik is a robust, barefooted, bearded, Vermont farmer. Though to meet him, you’ll discover his disposition is as gentle as the Disney character he channels. Each year he trains his ducks with a different song. The effect is enchanting! I found myself randomly humming the duck song for the rest of the week!  I was caught up in the moment, but I did happen to capture a quick video.  Click here to watch it!

duck whisperer

Erik’s rice is a hot commodity, and despite his growth, each year’s demand is greater than supply.  To reserve rice now and pick it up on his farm (you’ll be glad you did!), visit his website at www.vermontrice.net. Prices start at $4/lb.  If you’re feeling adventurous, you should also buy some duck eggs, which happen to be one of my favorite foods. You can also find his rice under the label Boundbrook Farm at local farmers markets. 

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

eggs

Posted: 7-9-2017

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world.

door

Last winter I discovered something I've been captivated with ever since: duck & rice farming. In a beautiful expression of naturally symbiotic relationships, Erik, of Vermont Rice, has brought this ancient Japanese method to Vermont.  The mechanics are very simple: ducklings don't eat rice, but they eat bugs! They also keep weeds from sprouting by paddling around the rice paddy and shoveling their bills along the bottom. Ever since hearing about Erik's operation, I have been obsessed with seeing it in action; and last week, I finally did!

Close up

Erik happened upon rice farming after he realized the farm he bought was extremely wet. Eager to grow organically and sustainably, he went straight to the source: Japan. After numerous trips to Asia, Erik honed his duck-rice farming skills and has been modestly expanding since he began seven years ago. With the help of a couple of UVM student assistants, he now maintains five acres of rice paddies in a valley between the rolling hills of Monkton and Vergennes.  By digging a pond, Erik is able to moderate the water levels in his paddies and capitalize on the valley's tendency to collect water.  Despite using ancient techniques, he uses modern machinery.  After recently investing in equipment only available in Japan, Erik would love to create a farming community of shared machinery and methods. A true visionary, he imagines a Vermont where more farmers begin using his system. Clearly passionate about his venture, he is not possessive of his knowledge or his equipment. 

ducks in paddy

Once the ducks are in the paddies, Erik and his team's responsibilities are minimal until harvest: they ensure the paddies maintain proper water levels and the ducks are safe. New this year, they built a three-storied duck house as a safety feature for the ducks at night. Otherwise, nature does its work the way it does best: naturally!  The ecosystem of the paddies feeds the ducks, and the ducks protect the paddies.

tractor

To fill five acres starting from seed required 730 seedling trays, planted in 6 rows of low hoop houses spanning a space of 36'x56'. Using his new motorized Japanese transplanter and a partner to load seed trays, Erik was able to transform days of backbreaking work into a half-day ordeal. Clearly pleased with his new contraption, Erik hopped on and showed me the machine in action. Arguably, his favorite feature is the row marker, which drags a line through the ground next to the row being planted. On the next pass, by aligning a rod on the front of the tractor with the line on the ground, he easily creates perfectly spaced, evenly planted rows.

me

The ducks, though, are the real stars of the operation. Erik brought me to his paddies, and asked, "wanna see something cool?" Ummm...hell yes I do! Then he started singing. Yes - singing! The ducks immediately reacted. They flocked from across the paddy, squirming each other out of the way as they fought to get out of the water to follow him. It was like Snow White's singing luring little forest creatures; except Erik is a robust, barefooted, bearded, Vermont farmer. Though to meet him, you'll discover his disposition is as gentle as the Disney character he channels. Each year he trains his ducks with a different song. The effect is enchanting! I found myself randomly humming the duck song for the rest of the week!  I was caught up in the moment, but I did happen to capture a quick video.  Click here to watch it!

duck whisperer

Erik's rice is a hot commodity, and despite his growth, each year's demand is greater than supply.  To reserve rice now and pick it up on his farm (you'll be glad you did!), visit his website at www.vermontrice.net. Prices start at $4/lb.  If you're feeling adventurous, you should also buy some duck eggs, which happen to be one of my favorite foods. You can also find his rice under the label Boundbrook Farm at local farmers markets. 

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

eggs

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world.

door

Last winter I discovered something I've been captivated with ever since: duck & rice farming. In a beautiful expression of naturally symbiotic relationships, Erik, of Vermont Rice, has brought this ancient Japanese method to Vermont.  The mechanics are very simple: ducklings don't eat rice, but they eat bugs! They also keep weeds from sprouting by paddling around the rice paddy and shoveling their bills along the bottom. Ever since hearing about Erik's operation, I have been obsessed with seeing it in action; and last week, I finally did!

Close up

Erik happened upon rice farming after he realized the farm he bought was extremely wet. Eager to grow organically and sustainably, he went straight to the source: Japan. After numerous trips to Asia, Erik honed his duck-rice farming skills and has been modestly expanding since he began seven years ago. With the help of a couple of UVM student assistants, he now maintains five acres of rice paddies in a valley between the rolling hills of Monkton and Vergennes.  By digging a pond, Erik is able to moderate the water levels in his paddies and capitalize on the valley's tendency to collect water.  Despite using ancient techniques, he uses modern machinery.  After recently investing in equipment only available in Japan, Erik would love to create a farming community of shared machinery and methods. A true visionary, he imagines a Vermont where more farmers begin using his system. Clearly passionate about his venture, he is not possessive of his knowledge or his equipment. 

ducks in paddy

Once the ducks are in the paddies, Erik and his team's responsibilities are minimal until harvest: they ensure the paddies maintain proper water levels and the ducks are safe. New this year, they built a three-storied duck house as a safety feature for the ducks at night. Otherwise, nature does its work the way it does best: naturally!  The ecosystem of the paddies feeds the ducks, and the ducks protect the paddies.

tractor

To fill five acres starting from seed required 730 seedling trays, planted in 6 rows of low hoop houses spanning a space of 36'x56'. Using his new motorized Japanese transplanter and a partner to load seed trays, Erik was able to transform days of backbreaking work into a half-day ordeal. Clearly pleased with his new contraption, Erik hopped on and showed me the machine in action. Arguably, his favorite feature is the row marker, which drags a line through the ground next to the row being planted. On the next pass, by aligning a rod on the front of the tractor with the line on the ground, he easily creates perfectly spaced, evenly planted rows.

me

The ducks, though, are the real stars of the operation. Erik brought me to his paddies, and asked, "wanna see something cool?" Ummm...hell yes I do! Then he started singing. Yes - singing! The ducks immediately reacted. They flocked from across the paddy, squirming each other out of the way as they fought to get out of the water to follow him. It was like Snow White's singing luring little forest creatures; except Erik is a robust, barefooted, bearded, Vermont farmer. Though to meet him, you'll discover his disposition is as gentle as the Disney character he channels. Each year he trains his ducks with a different song. The effect is enchanting! I found myself randomly humming the duck song for the rest of the week!  I was caught up in the moment, but I did happen to capture a quick video.  Click here to watch it!

duck whisperer

Erik's rice is a hot commodity, and despite his growth, each year's demand is greater than supply.  To reserve rice now and pick it up on his farm (you'll be glad you did!), visit his website at www.vermontrice.net. Prices start at $4/lb.  If you're feeling adventurous, you should also buy some duck eggs, which happen to be one of my favorite foods. You can also find his rice under the label Boundbrook Farm at local farmers markets. 

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

eggs

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world.

door

Last winter I discovered something I've been captivated with ever since: duck & rice farming. In a beautiful expression of naturally symbiotic relationships, Erik, of Vermont Rice, has brought this ancient Japanese method to Vermont.  The mechanics are very simple: ducklings don't eat rice, but they eat bugs! They also keep weeds from sprouting by paddling around the rice paddy and shoveling their bills along the bottom. Ever since hearing about Erik's operation, I have been obsessed with seeing it in action; and last week, I finally did!

Close up

Erik happened upon rice farming after he realized the farm he bought was extremely wet. Eager to grow organically and sustainably, he went straight to the source: Japan. After numerous trips to Asia, Erik honed his duck-rice farming skills and has been modestly expanding since he began seven years ago. With the help of a couple of UVM student assistants, he now maintains five acres of rice paddies in a valley between the rolling hills of Monkton and Vergennes.  By digging a pond, Erik is able to moderate the water levels in his paddies and capitalize on the valley's tendency to collect water.  Despite using ancient techniques, he uses modern machinery.  After recently investing in equipment only available in Japan, Erik would love to create a farming community of shared machinery and methods. A true visionary, he imagines a Vermont where more farmers begin using his system. Clearly passionate about his venture, he is not possessive of his knowledge or his equipment. 

ducks in paddy

Once the ducks are in the paddies, Erik and his team's responsibilities are minimal until harvest: they ensure the paddies maintain proper water levels and the ducks are safe. New this year, they built a three-storied duck house as a safety feature for the ducks at night. Otherwise, nature does its work the way it does best: naturally!  The ecosystem of the paddies feeds the ducks, and the ducks protect the paddies.

tractor

To fill five acres starting from seed required 730 seedling trays, planted in 6 rows of low hoop houses spanning a space of 36'x56'. Using his new motorized Japanese transplanter and a partner to load seed trays, Erik was able to transform days of backbreaking work into a half-day ordeal. Clearly pleased with his new contraption, Erik hopped on and showed me the machine in action. Arguably, his favorite feature is the row marker, which drags a line through the ground next to the row being planted. On the next pass, by aligning a rod on the front of the tractor with the line on the ground, he easily creates perfectly spaced, evenly planted rows.

me

The ducks, though, are the real stars of the operation. Erik brought me to his paddies, and asked, "wanna see something cool?" Ummm...hell yes I do! Then he started singing. Yes - singing! The ducks immediately reacted. They flocked from across the paddy, squirming each other out of the way as they fought to get out of the water to follow him. It was like Snow White's singing luring little forest creatures; except Erik is a robust, barefooted, bearded, Vermont farmer. Though to meet him, you'll discover his disposition is as gentle as the Disney character he channels. Each year he trains his ducks with a different song. The effect is enchanting! I found myself randomly humming the duck song for the rest of the week!  I was caught up in the moment, but I did happen to capture a quick video.  Click here to watch it!

duck whisperer

Erik's rice is a hot commodity, and despite his growth, each year's demand is greater than supply.  To reserve rice now and pick it up on his farm (you'll be glad you did!), visit his website at www.vermontrice.net. Prices start at $4/lb.  If you're feeling adventurous, you should also buy some duck eggs, which happen to be one of my favorite foods. You can also find his rice under the label Boundbrook Farm at local farmers markets. 

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

eggs

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