A culinary online center dedicated to promoting the importance and the joy of American home cooking with an emphasis on local products and talent, celebrating the unique spirit and energy of the new food world ethos, especially in Vermont.

amuse bouche

I love quotes that add meaning to my life. Here are a few to live by:

Approach love and cooking with reckless abandon.
—The Dalai Lama

Rhubarb is a metaphor for finding happiness in your own backyard.
—Garrison Keillor

Buy your snacks from a farmers’ market.
—Michael Pollan

Even when he had a garden in Paris, Thomas Jefferson cultivated Indian corn, “to eat green in our manner, …as quickly after it left the stalk as possible.
—Evan Jones, from American Food

The Mindful Carnivore

Tovar Cerulli's The Mindful Carnivore: A Vegetarian’s Hunt for Sustenance

The Mindful Carnivore: A Vegetarian’s Hunt for Sustenance
Author: Tovar Cerulli
Publisher: Pegasus Books LLC 
Buy Now (or order the book from your local independent bookstore!)

I met Tovar Cerulli, author of The Mindful Carnivore, two years ago when he was in the process of publishing his book. It was at a poetry reading in Waitsfield, Vermont. Tovar’s wife was catering the event for friends and Tovar was there too, an interested fellow writer. I guessed that Tovar was a PhD student just from his appearance, and I might have thought he was a vegetarian from his slim build, but I never would have thought of him as a hunter if we hadn’t discussed the subject of his new book, his decision to hunt deer rather then eat commercial meat.

My Prejudice
In that moment of surprise, I recognized my prejudice toward hunters and guns. It was one I was ashamed of, living in the state of Vermont, because Vermonters take their hunting very seriously. And for good reason since, for many, deer and other wild animal meat is the source of protein depended upon by many Vermonters.

I remember the first time I was made aware of the local reliance on hunting and the difference between my life as a Connecticut suburban-raised child and the lives of those who lived near us on Stannard Mountain, our summer home in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont.

Not a Sport
One Thanksgiving, traveling on a back road in Vermont, I passed by a small farmhouse, smoke trailing out of the large brick chimney indicating the family was at home. In the front yard, for everyone to see, was a large buck hung on a wooden rack set up to allow the dead animal to bleed. It was on one hand a terrible sight, the large animal slit open and gutted, but on the other, it was so real and raw, it left the indelible impression on me of the importance of hunting. This was not the evidence of a sport, the casual game of wealthy Americans with access to hunting clubs and fine rifles. This was the work of people who would fill their freezer, and possibly the freezers of family members and friends with meat for the winter.

When I met Tovar many years after that first awareness, I really thought I understood. I was completely confident in my attitude about hunting, especially hunting in Vermont. But, there it was, when I was surprised by the subject of his book, my prejudice so apparent I couldn’t deny it. I still believed that hunters were a certain kind of person, a certain kind of man, especially, and one that I didn’t really understand. My love of animals and my fear of guns and violence blended together into a single prejudice. That’s when I knew I had to read Tovar’s book when it was published. 

A Process
Reading The Mindful Carnivore is a process. At least it was for me. Tovar describes, very winningly, the many hurdles he had to go over to become a meat eater, again, after his doctor recommended meat protein be introduced back into his diet. Being a fisherman from childhood, and having an uncle who is a hunter helped him to come to the conclusion that hunting his own red meat was a better option then running down to the grocery store to buy it.

Slowly, I found myself won over by the sincerity of his experience and the conscience he brought to it while dealing with the everyday hurdles of introducing, first milk products and then fish and chicken into his diet. The mastery of hunting, a long and arduous experience, is, in itself, a reason to read the book. 

The Best Reason
There are a lot of good reasons to read The Mindful Carnivore. It is one way to understand the reason for being a vegetarian, or a vegan, as Tovar had been when he was younger. It is also a way to understand the evolution of man from cave to high-rise and why there is some latent urge that many of us have to shoot animals for our dinner.

The best reason to read The Mindful Carnivore, I think, is the emphasis that Tovar places on mindfulness, on the consideration we need to have about everything we eat. In talking about the “enchantment of the uncertainty” of hunting, he brings the reader into a different space than the one we usually reserve for any discussion about food. Twenty-first century humans—most of us— don’t worry about where we will find our next meal, but only what it will be. In The Mindful Carnivore, you will find a change that happens to the things you think you understand, just as I did. And, you will be reminded, again, that everything is connected and this applies to what we ingest, whether it is wild deer meat or meat that comes from a domesticated animal.  In truth, it’s a book about “… how we live in the world well,” with consciousness and concern for everything in our lives.

A Bientôt,

 

Posted: 1-20-2013

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Tovar Cerulli's The Mindful Carnivore: A Vegetarian’s Hunt for Sustenance

The Mindful Carnivore: A Vegetarian’s Hunt for Sustenance
Author: Tovar Cerulli
Publisher: Pegasus Books LLC 
Buy Now (or order the book from your local independent bookstore!)

I met Tovar Cerulli, author of The Mindful Carnivore, two years ago when he was in the process of publishing his book. It was at a poetry reading in Waitsfield, Vermont. Tovar’s wife was catering the event for friends and Tovar was there too, an interested fellow writer. I guessed that Tovar was a PhD student just from his appearance, and I might have thought he was a vegetarian from his slim build, but I never would have thought of him as a hunter if we hadn’t discussed the subject of his new book, his decision to hunt deer rather then eat commercial meat.

My Prejudice
In that moment of surprise, I recognized my prejudice toward hunters and guns. It was one I was ashamed of, living in the state of Vermont, because Vermonters take their hunting very seriously. And for good reason since, for many, deer and other wild animal meat is the source of protein depended upon by many Vermonters.

I remember the first time I was made aware of the local reliance on hunting and the difference between my life as a Connecticut suburban-raised child and the lives of those who lived near us on Stannard Mountain, our summer home in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont.

Not a Sport
One Thanksgiving, traveling on a back road in Vermont, I passed by a small farmhouse, smoke trailing out of the large brick chimney indicating the family was at home. In the front yard, for everyone to see, was a large buck hung on a wooden rack set up to allow the dead animal to bleed. It was on one hand a terrible sight, the large animal slit open and gutted, but on the other, it was so real and raw, it left the indelible impression on me of the importance of hunting. This was not the evidence of a sport, the casual game of wealthy Americans with access to hunting clubs and fine rifles. This was the work of people who would fill their freezer, and possibly the freezers of family members and friends with meat for the winter.

When I met Tovar many years after that first awareness, I really thought I understood. I was completely confident in my attitude about hunting, especially hunting in Vermont. But, there it was, when I was surprised by the subject of his book, my prejudice so apparent I couldn’t deny it. I still believed that hunters were a certain kind of person, a certain kind of man, especially, and one that I didn’t really understand. My love of animals and my fear of guns and violence blended together into a single prejudice. That’s when I knew I had to read Tovar’s book when it was published. 

A Process
Reading The Mindful Carnivore is a process. At least it was for me. Tovar describes, very winningly, the many hurdles he had to go over to become a meat eater, again, after his doctor recommended meat protein be introduced back into his diet. Being a fisherman from childhood, and having an uncle who is a hunter helped him to come to the conclusion that hunting his own red meat was a better option then running down to the grocery store to buy it.

Slowly, I found myself won over by the sincerity of his experience and the conscience he brought to it while dealing with the everyday hurdles of introducing, first milk products and then fish and chicken into his diet. The mastery of hunting, a long and arduous experience, is, in itself, a reason to read the book. 

The Best Reason
There are a lot of good reasons to read The Mindful Carnivore. It is one way to understand the reason for being a vegetarian, or a vegan, as Tovar had been when he was younger. It is also a way to understand the evolution of man from cave to high-rise and why there is some latent urge that many of us have to shoot animals for our dinner.

The best reason to read The Mindful Carnivore, I think, is the emphasis that Tovar places on mindfulness, on the consideration we need to have about everything we eat. In talking about the “enchantment of the uncertainty” of hunting, he brings the reader into a different space than the one we usually reserve for any discussion about food. Twenty-first century humans—most of us— don’t worry about where we will find our next meal, but only what it will be. In The Mindful Carnivore, you will find a change that happens to the things you think you understand, just as I did. And, you will be reminded, again, that everything is connected and this applies to what we ingest, whether it is wild deer meat or meat that comes from a domesticated animal.  In truth, it’s a book about “… how we live in the world well," with consciousness and concern for everything in our lives.

A Bientôt,

 

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Tovar Cerulli's The Mindful Carnivore: A Vegetarian’s Hunt for Sustenance

The Mindful Carnivore: A Vegetarian’s Hunt for Sustenance
Author: Tovar Cerulli
Publisher: Pegasus Books LLC 
Buy Now (or order the book from your local independent bookstore!)

I met Tovar Cerulli, author of The Mindful Carnivore, two years ago when he was in the process of publishing his book. It was at a poetry reading in Waitsfield, Vermont. Tovar’s wife was catering the event for friends and Tovar was there too, an interested fellow writer. I guessed that Tovar was a PhD student just from his appearance, and I might have thought he was a vegetarian from his slim build, but I never would have thought of him as a hunter if we hadn’t discussed the subject of his new book, his decision to hunt deer rather then eat commercial meat.

My Prejudice
In that moment of surprise, I recognized my prejudice toward hunters and guns. It was one I was ashamed of, living in the state of Vermont, because Vermonters take their hunting very seriously. And for good reason since, for many, deer and other wild animal meat is the source of protein depended upon by many Vermonters.

I remember the first time I was made aware of the local reliance on hunting and the difference between my life as a Connecticut suburban-raised child and the lives of those who lived near us on Stannard Mountain, our summer home in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont.

Not a Sport
One Thanksgiving, traveling on a back road in Vermont, I passed by a small farmhouse, smoke trailing out of the large brick chimney indicating the family was at home. In the front yard, for everyone to see, was a large buck hung on a wooden rack set up to allow the dead animal to bleed. It was on one hand a terrible sight, the large animal slit open and gutted, but on the other, it was so real and raw, it left the indelible impression on me of the importance of hunting. This was not the evidence of a sport, the casual game of wealthy Americans with access to hunting clubs and fine rifles. This was the work of people who would fill their freezer, and possibly the freezers of family members and friends with meat for the winter.

When I met Tovar many years after that first awareness, I really thought I understood. I was completely confident in my attitude about hunting, especially hunting in Vermont. But, there it was, when I was surprised by the subject of his book, my prejudice so apparent I couldn’t deny it. I still believed that hunters were a certain kind of person, a certain kind of man, especially, and one that I didn’t really understand. My love of animals and my fear of guns and violence blended together into a single prejudice. That’s when I knew I had to read Tovar’s book when it was published. 

A Process
Reading The Mindful Carnivore is a process. At least it was for me. Tovar describes, very winningly, the many hurdles he had to go over to become a meat eater, again, after his doctor recommended meat protein be introduced back into his diet. Being a fisherman from childhood, and having an uncle who is a hunter helped him to come to the conclusion that hunting his own red meat was a better option then running down to the grocery store to buy it.

Slowly, I found myself won over by the sincerity of his experience and the conscience he brought to it while dealing with the everyday hurdles of introducing, first milk products and then fish and chicken into his diet. The mastery of hunting, a long and arduous experience, is, in itself, a reason to read the book. 

The Best Reason
There are a lot of good reasons to read The Mindful Carnivore. It is one way to understand the reason for being a vegetarian, or a vegan, as Tovar had been when he was younger. It is also a way to understand the evolution of man from cave to high-rise and why there is some latent urge that many of us have to shoot animals for our dinner.

The best reason to read The Mindful Carnivore, I think, is the emphasis that Tovar places on mindfulness, on the consideration we need to have about everything we eat. In talking about the “enchantment of the uncertainty” of hunting, he brings the reader into a different space than the one we usually reserve for any discussion about food. Twenty-first century humans—most of us— don’t worry about where we will find our next meal, but only what it will be. In The Mindful Carnivore, you will find a change that happens to the things you think you understand, just as I did. And, you will be reminded, again, that everything is connected and this applies to what we ingest, whether it is wild deer meat or meat that comes from a domesticated animal.  In truth, it’s a book about “… how we live in the world well," with consciousness and concern for everything in our lives.

A Bientôt,

 

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Tovar Cerulli's The Mindful Carnivore: A Vegetarian’s Hunt for Sustenance

The Mindful Carnivore: A Vegetarian’s Hunt for Sustenance
Author: Tovar Cerulli
Publisher: Pegasus Books LLC 
Buy Now (or order the book from your local independent bookstore!)

I met Tovar Cerulli, author of The Mindful Carnivore, two years ago when he was in the process of publishing his book. It was at a poetry reading in Waitsfield, Vermont. Tovar’s wife was catering the event for friends and Tovar was there too, an interested fellow writer. I guessed that Tovar was a PhD student just from his appearance, and I might have thought he was a vegetarian from his slim build, but I never would have thought of him as a hunter if we hadn’t discussed the subject of his new book, his decision to hunt deer rather then eat commercial meat.

My Prejudice
In that moment of surprise, I recognized my prejudice toward hunters and guns. It was one I was ashamed of, living in the state of Vermont, because Vermonters take their hunting very seriously. And for good reason since, for many, deer and other wild animal meat is the source of protein depended upon by many Vermonters.

I remember the first time I was made aware of the local reliance on hunting and the difference between my life as a Connecticut suburban-raised child and the lives of those who lived near us on Stannard Mountain, our summer home in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont.

Not a Sport
One Thanksgiving, traveling on a back road in Vermont, I passed by a small farmhouse, smoke trailing out of the large brick chimney indicating the family was at home. In the front yard, for everyone to see, was a large buck hung on a wooden rack set up to allow the dead animal to bleed. It was on one hand a terrible sight, the large animal slit open and gutted, but on the other, it was so real and raw, it left the indelible impression on me of the importance of hunting. This was not the evidence of a sport, the casual game of wealthy Americans with access to hunting clubs and fine rifles. This was the work of people who would fill their freezer, and possibly the freezers of family members and friends with meat for the winter.

When I met Tovar many years after that first awareness, I really thought I understood. I was completely confident in my attitude about hunting, especially hunting in Vermont. But, there it was, when I was surprised by the subject of his book, my prejudice so apparent I couldn’t deny it. I still believed that hunters were a certain kind of person, a certain kind of man, especially, and one that I didn’t really understand. My love of animals and my fear of guns and violence blended together into a single prejudice. That’s when I knew I had to read Tovar’s book when it was published. 

A Process
Reading The Mindful Carnivore is a process. At least it was for me. Tovar describes, very winningly, the many hurdles he had to go over to become a meat eater, again, after his doctor recommended meat protein be introduced back into his diet. Being a fisherman from childhood, and having an uncle who is a hunter helped him to come to the conclusion that hunting his own red meat was a better option then running down to the grocery store to buy it.

Slowly, I found myself won over by the sincerity of his experience and the conscience he brought to it while dealing with the everyday hurdles of introducing, first milk products and then fish and chicken into his diet. The mastery of hunting, a long and arduous experience, is, in itself, a reason to read the book. 

The Best Reason
There are a lot of good reasons to read The Mindful Carnivore. It is one way to understand the reason for being a vegetarian, or a vegan, as Tovar had been when he was younger. It is also a way to understand the evolution of man from cave to high-rise and why there is some latent urge that many of us have to shoot animals for our dinner.

The best reason to read The Mindful Carnivore, I think, is the emphasis that Tovar places on mindfulness, on the consideration we need to have about everything we eat. In talking about the “enchantment of the uncertainty” of hunting, he brings the reader into a different space than the one we usually reserve for any discussion about food. Twenty-first century humans—most of us— don’t worry about where we will find our next meal, but only what it will be. In The Mindful Carnivore, you will find a change that happens to the things you think you understand, just as I did. And, you will be reminded, again, that everything is connected and this applies to what we ingest, whether it is wild deer meat or meat that comes from a domesticated animal.  In truth, it’s a book about “… how we live in the world well," with consciousness and concern for everything in our lives.

A Bientôt,

 

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