A culinary online center dedicated to promoting the importance and the joy of American home cooking with an emphasis on local products and talent, celebrating the unique spirit and energy of the new food world ethos, especially in Vermont.

amuse bouche

I love quotes that add meaning to my life. Here are a few to live by:

We can dramatically increase global food availability and environmental sustainability by using more of our crops to feed people directly and less to fatten livestock.
—Jonathan A. Foley, director of the Institute on the Environment, U of MN

Don’t eat anything your great-grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food.
—Michael Pollan

Cooking is at once child’s play and adult joy. And cooking done with care is an act of love.
—Craig Claiborne

People who eat according to the rules of a traditional food culture are generally healthier than those of us eating a modern Western diet of processed food.
—Michael Pollan

The Spirit of Vermont at the 2013 UVM Food Sustainability Summit

Featured image

Artist Katie Runde’s chalk drawing in front of the Royall Tyler Theater for the UVM Food Sustainability Summit

Moving to Vermont in 2004 reawakened my interest and enthusiasm for the food world. Having grown up in a family of food-obsessed parents, I, of course, chose another professional field to pursue, the fine arts. I never expected to find myself following a direction that my stepmother and father found so engaging–American food. But, I was seduced when I moved to Vermont. The dynamic energy of Vermont’s burgeoning food world was a force I couldn’t deny and I became a convert to something very exciting and real in my adopted state, a food revolution.

Defining a New Paradigm
What is happening in my state is a vivid reflection of the growing awareness by many Americans that without a change, a defining of a new paradigm, the food system in our country and throughout the world is in danger of collapse. If not collapse, it will continue to contribute to the rising list of health, economic and ethical issues that writers such as Michael Pollan, and our personal experiences, have made us aware of. Two weeks ago, I attended the University of Vermont’s Food Sustainability Summit: Leading The Necessary (r)Evolution for Sustainable Food Systems AMPLIFIED. It made me sure that I’d made the right decision to turn my attention to what is going on in the food world. 

IMG_1187

Tanya, Fields, Executive Director of BLK ProjeK, talking to summit attendees

I Felt Privileged to be Able to Join Them
In its second year, the Summit was the culmination of a four-week program sponsored by the University of Vermont’s Department of Continuing Education, with support from The Center for Sustainable Agriculture and UVM’s Extension Services Department. At the same time as the latest Farm Bill was voted down by our addlepated Congress, thirty students from the United States as well as Syria, Denmark, Mexico and Uganda, convened on campus for a final week of classes, farm tours, and a culminating public forum that included national public speakers—all experts on what it will take to improve and expand on programs destined to provide food sustainability here and around the world. I felt privileged to be able to join them. 

First Day of Events
It’s true that the entrepreneurs fueling the food movement here in Vermont are mostly very young, but never was this brought home more then when I walked into the Royall Tyler Theater on the UVM Campus to attend the first day of events for the Summit. The black box theater was filled with what looked like an introductory gathering of college freshman. A few grey heads were dotted throughout the crowd but they were far outnumbered by the fresh faces of young enthusiasm.

IMG_1183

Doug Lantagne, Dean and /Director of UVM Extension, introducing the Food Summit panelists

World-wide Improvement of the Food Systems
Speakers from numbers of disciplines related to the subject of food sustainability spoke with varying degrees of intensity, but it was clear that all were passionate about their subject. From Tamar Adler, a James Beard Award winner, who once cooked at the legendary Chez Panisse in California and who spoke in the soft tones of her mentor, Alice Waters, to farmer and Vermont State Senator, David Zuckerman, whose love of his farm, his animals, his crops and his family shined throughout his description of what it was like to be a farmer here. The speakers inspired, provoked and educated as they described both the problems ahead and the exciting possibilities available to anyone with a willingness to risk for a world-wide improvement of the food systems now in place. Their challenge to the audience was to join the movement to create a new paradigm that would solve problems long pushed under the rug by large companies only interested in the bottom-line. 

They Were All Inspiration
I felt, if not a “fresh face”, at least an inspired one as I stepped out into the sunlight musing over the new viewpoints of the following summit speakers, among others:

  • Tanya Fields, a single mother who directs an organization in the Bronx identifying and supporting new economic development concepts addressing food justice;
  • Yoni Freedhof, a doctor from Toronto making obesity his most important health concern;
  • Gary Paul Nabhan, a nationally known Vermont writer on the subject of local food, and a leader in understanding the links between biodiversity and cultural diversity;
  • Karen Washington, a native of the Bronx, a community gardener and activist turning empty lots into flourishing mini-farms, as a way to bring local and healthy food into her community.

They were all inspiration for what can be done now in a world demanding change in food sustainability.

P1020092

Student farmers from the Farmer Training Program at UVM

Farms in Vermont to the Rest of the World
It couldn’t have been more fitting that what was waiting for me outside the Royall Tyler Theater was the fresh lettuce, kale and garlic ramps at UVM’s own farm program kiosk, with the smiling faces of area students, to wish me well as I left the Summit. What better take-away than an armful of local produce! Thank you, University of Vermont, for a grounded and thought-provoking two days. Besides the genuine information I came away with about the national and international food systems that we will have to change, I was struck with the fact that Vermont represents much of what is best in the new paradigm of local and organic. If we can export what we’ve learned on hardscrabble farms in Vermont to the rest of the world, we can effect important change, I’m sure of it! 

A Bientot,

Posted: 7-12-2013

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[caption id="attachment_2658" align="alignnone" width="518"]Featured image Artist Katie Runde's chalk drawing in front of the Royall Tyler Theater for the UVM Food Sustainability Summit[/caption]

Moving to Vermont in 2004 reawakened my interest and enthusiasm for the food world. Having grown up in a family of food-obsessed parents, I, of course, chose another professional field to pursue, the fine arts. I never expected to find myself following a direction that my stepmother and father found so engaging--American food. But, I was seduced when I moved to Vermont. The dynamic energy of Vermont’s burgeoning food world was a force I couldn’t deny and I became a convert to something very exciting and real in my adopted state, a food revolution.

Defining a New Paradigm
What is happening in my state is a vivid reflection of the growing awareness by many Americans that without a change, a defining of a new paradigm, the food system in our country and throughout the world is in danger of collapse. If not collapse, it will continue to contribute to the rising list of health, economic and ethical issues that writers such as Michael Pollan, and our personal experiences, have made us aware of. Two weeks ago, I attended the University of Vermont’s Food Sustainability Summit: Leading The Necessary (r)Evolution for Sustainable Food Systems AMPLIFIED. It made me sure that I’d made the right decision to turn my attention to what is going on in the food world. 

[caption id="attachment_2630" align="alignnone" width="518"]IMG_1187 Tanya, Fields, Executive Director of BLK ProjeK, talking to summit attendees[/caption]

I Felt Privileged to be Able to Join Them
In its second year, the Summit was the culmination of a four-week program sponsored by the University of Vermont’s Department of Continuing Education, with support from The Center for Sustainable Agriculture and UVM’s Extension Services Department. At the same time as the latest Farm Bill was voted down by our addlepated Congress, thirty students from the United States as well as Syria, Denmark, Mexico and Uganda, convened on campus for a final week of classes, farm tours, and a culminating public forum that included national public speakers—all experts on what it will take to improve and expand on programs destined to provide food sustainability here and around the world. I felt privileged to be able to join them. 

First Day of Events
It’s true that the entrepreneurs fueling the food movement here in Vermont are mostly very young, but never was this brought home more then when I walked into the Royall Tyler Theater on the UVM Campus to attend the first day of events for the Summit. The black box theater was filled with what looked like an introductory gathering of college freshman. A few grey heads were dotted throughout the crowd but they were far outnumbered by the fresh faces of young enthusiasm.

[caption id="attachment_2632" align="alignnone" width="528"]IMG_1183 Doug Lantagne, Dean and /Director of UVM Extension, introducing the Food Summit panelists[/caption]

World-wide Improvement of the Food Systems
Speakers from numbers of disciplines related to the subject of food sustainability spoke with varying degrees of intensity, but it was clear that all were passionate about their subject. From Tamar Adler, a James Beard Award winner, who once cooked at the legendary Chez Panisse in California and who spoke in the soft tones of her mentor, Alice Waters, to farmer and Vermont State Senator, David Zuckerman, whose love of his farm, his animals, his crops and his family shined throughout his description of what it was like to be a farmer here. The speakers inspired, provoked and educated as they described both the problems ahead and the exciting possibilities available to anyone with a willingness to risk for a world-wide improvement of the food systems now in place. Their challenge to the audience was to join the movement to create a new paradigm that would solve problems long pushed under the rug by large companies only interested in the bottom-line. 

They Were All Inspiration
I felt, if not a “fresh face”, at least an inspired one as I stepped out into the sunlight musing over the new viewpoints of the following summit speakers, among others:

  • Tanya Fields, a single mother who directs an organization in the Bronx identifying and supporting new economic development concepts addressing food justice;
  • Yoni Freedhof, a doctor from Toronto making obesity his most important health concern;
  • Gary Paul Nabhan, a nationally known Vermont writer on the subject of local food, and a leader in understanding the links between biodiversity and cultural diversity;
  • Karen Washington, a native of the Bronx, a community gardener and activist turning empty lots into flourishing mini-farms, as a way to bring local and healthy food into her community.

They were all inspiration for what can be done now in a world demanding change in food sustainability.

[caption id="attachment_2642" align="alignnone" width="518"]P1020092 Student farmers from the Farmer Training Program at UVM[/caption]

Farms in Vermont to the Rest of the World
It couldn’t have been more fitting that what was waiting for me outside the Royall Tyler Theater was the fresh lettuce, kale and garlic ramps at UVM’s own farm program kiosk, with the smiling faces of area students, to wish me well as I left the Summit. What better take-away than an armful of local produce! Thank you, University of Vermont, for a grounded and thought-provoking two days. Besides the genuine information I came away with about the national and international food systems that we will have to change, I was struck with the fact that Vermont represents much of what is best in the new paradigm of local and organic. If we can export what we’ve learned on hardscrabble farms in Vermont to the rest of the world, we can effect important change, I’m sure of it! 

A Bientot,

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[caption id="attachment_2658" align="alignnone" width="518"]Featured image Artist Katie Runde's chalk drawing in front of the Royall Tyler Theater for the UVM Food Sustainability Summit[/caption]

Moving to Vermont in 2004 reawakened my interest and enthusiasm for the food world. Having grown up in a family of food-obsessed parents, I, of course, chose another professional field to pursue, the fine arts. I never expected to find myself following a direction that my stepmother and father found so engaging--American food. But, I was seduced when I moved to Vermont. The dynamic energy of Vermont’s burgeoning food world was a force I couldn’t deny and I became a convert to something very exciting and real in my adopted state, a food revolution.

Defining a New Paradigm
What is happening in my state is a vivid reflection of the growing awareness by many Americans that without a change, a defining of a new paradigm, the food system in our country and throughout the world is in danger of collapse. If not collapse, it will continue to contribute to the rising list of health, economic and ethical issues that writers such as Michael Pollan, and our personal experiences, have made us aware of. Two weeks ago, I attended the University of Vermont’s Food Sustainability Summit: Leading The Necessary (r)Evolution for Sustainable Food Systems AMPLIFIED. It made me sure that I’d made the right decision to turn my attention to what is going on in the food world. 

[caption id="attachment_2630" align="alignnone" width="518"]IMG_1187 Tanya, Fields, Executive Director of BLK ProjeK, talking to summit attendees[/caption]

I Felt Privileged to be Able to Join Them
In its second year, the Summit was the culmination of a four-week program sponsored by the University of Vermont’s Department of Continuing Education, with support from The Center for Sustainable Agriculture and UVM’s Extension Services Department. At the same time as the latest Farm Bill was voted down by our addlepated Congress, thirty students from the United States as well as Syria, Denmark, Mexico and Uganda, convened on campus for a final week of classes, farm tours, and a culminating public forum that included national public speakers—all experts on what it will take to improve and expand on programs destined to provide food sustainability here and around the world. I felt privileged to be able to join them. 

First Day of Events
It’s true that the entrepreneurs fueling the food movement here in Vermont are mostly very young, but never was this brought home more then when I walked into the Royall Tyler Theater on the UVM Campus to attend the first day of events for the Summit. The black box theater was filled with what looked like an introductory gathering of college freshman. A few grey heads were dotted throughout the crowd but they were far outnumbered by the fresh faces of young enthusiasm.

[caption id="attachment_2632" align="alignnone" width="528"]IMG_1183 Doug Lantagne, Dean and /Director of UVM Extension, introducing the Food Summit panelists[/caption]

World-wide Improvement of the Food Systems
Speakers from numbers of disciplines related to the subject of food sustainability spoke with varying degrees of intensity, but it was clear that all were passionate about their subject. From Tamar Adler, a James Beard Award winner, who once cooked at the legendary Chez Panisse in California and who spoke in the soft tones of her mentor, Alice Waters, to farmer and Vermont State Senator, David Zuckerman, whose love of his farm, his animals, his crops and his family shined throughout his description of what it was like to be a farmer here. The speakers inspired, provoked and educated as they described both the problems ahead and the exciting possibilities available to anyone with a willingness to risk for a world-wide improvement of the food systems now in place. Their challenge to the audience was to join the movement to create a new paradigm that would solve problems long pushed under the rug by large companies only interested in the bottom-line. 

They Were All Inspiration
I felt, if not a “fresh face”, at least an inspired one as I stepped out into the sunlight musing over the new viewpoints of the following summit speakers, among others:

  • Tanya Fields, a single mother who directs an organization in the Bronx identifying and supporting new economic development concepts addressing food justice;
  • Yoni Freedhof, a doctor from Toronto making obesity his most important health concern;
  • Gary Paul Nabhan, a nationally known Vermont writer on the subject of local food, and a leader in understanding the links between biodiversity and cultural diversity;
  • Karen Washington, a native of the Bronx, a community gardener and activist turning empty lots into flourishing mini-farms, as a way to bring local and healthy food into her community.

They were all inspiration for what can be done now in a world demanding change in food sustainability.

[caption id="attachment_2642" align="alignnone" width="518"]P1020092 Student farmers from the Farmer Training Program at UVM[/caption]

Farms in Vermont to the Rest of the World
It couldn’t have been more fitting that what was waiting for me outside the Royall Tyler Theater was the fresh lettuce, kale and garlic ramps at UVM’s own farm program kiosk, with the smiling faces of area students, to wish me well as I left the Summit. What better take-away than an armful of local produce! Thank you, University of Vermont, for a grounded and thought-provoking two days. Besides the genuine information I came away with about the national and international food systems that we will have to change, I was struck with the fact that Vermont represents much of what is best in the new paradigm of local and organic. If we can export what we’ve learned on hardscrabble farms in Vermont to the rest of the world, we can effect important change, I’m sure of it! 

A Bientot,

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[caption id="attachment_2658" align="alignnone" width="518"]Featured image Artist Katie Runde's chalk drawing in front of the Royall Tyler Theater for the UVM Food Sustainability Summit[/caption]

Moving to Vermont in 2004 reawakened my interest and enthusiasm for the food world. Having grown up in a family of food-obsessed parents, I, of course, chose another professional field to pursue, the fine arts. I never expected to find myself following a direction that my stepmother and father found so engaging--American food. But, I was seduced when I moved to Vermont. The dynamic energy of Vermont’s burgeoning food world was a force I couldn’t deny and I became a convert to something very exciting and real in my adopted state, a food revolution.

Defining a New Paradigm
What is happening in my state is a vivid reflection of the growing awareness by many Americans that without a change, a defining of a new paradigm, the food system in our country and throughout the world is in danger of collapse. If not collapse, it will continue to contribute to the rising list of health, economic and ethical issues that writers such as Michael Pollan, and our personal experiences, have made us aware of. Two weeks ago, I attended the University of Vermont’s Food Sustainability Summit: Leading The Necessary (r)Evolution for Sustainable Food Systems AMPLIFIED. It made me sure that I’d made the right decision to turn my attention to what is going on in the food world. 

[caption id="attachment_2630" align="alignnone" width="518"]IMG_1187 Tanya, Fields, Executive Director of BLK ProjeK, talking to summit attendees[/caption]

I Felt Privileged to be Able to Join Them
In its second year, the Summit was the culmination of a four-week program sponsored by the University of Vermont’s Department of Continuing Education, with support from The Center for Sustainable Agriculture and UVM’s Extension Services Department. At the same time as the latest Farm Bill was voted down by our addlepated Congress, thirty students from the United States as well as Syria, Denmark, Mexico and Uganda, convened on campus for a final week of classes, farm tours, and a culminating public forum that included national public speakers—all experts on what it will take to improve and expand on programs destined to provide food sustainability here and around the world. I felt privileged to be able to join them. 

First Day of Events
It’s true that the entrepreneurs fueling the food movement here in Vermont are mostly very young, but never was this brought home more then when I walked into the Royall Tyler Theater on the UVM Campus to attend the first day of events for the Summit. The black box theater was filled with what looked like an introductory gathering of college freshman. A few grey heads were dotted throughout the crowd but they were far outnumbered by the fresh faces of young enthusiasm.

[caption id="attachment_2632" align="alignnone" width="528"]IMG_1183 Doug Lantagne, Dean and /Director of UVM Extension, introducing the Food Summit panelists[/caption]

World-wide Improvement of the Food Systems
Speakers from numbers of disciplines related to the subject of food sustainability spoke with varying degrees of intensity, but it was clear that all were passionate about their subject. From Tamar Adler, a James Beard Award winner, who once cooked at the legendary Chez Panisse in California and who spoke in the soft tones of her mentor, Alice Waters, to farmer and Vermont State Senator, David Zuckerman, whose love of his farm, his animals, his crops and his family shined throughout his description of what it was like to be a farmer here. The speakers inspired, provoked and educated as they described both the problems ahead and the exciting possibilities available to anyone with a willingness to risk for a world-wide improvement of the food systems now in place. Their challenge to the audience was to join the movement to create a new paradigm that would solve problems long pushed under the rug by large companies only interested in the bottom-line. 

They Were All Inspiration
I felt, if not a “fresh face”, at least an inspired one as I stepped out into the sunlight musing over the new viewpoints of the following summit speakers, among others:

  • Tanya Fields, a single mother who directs an organization in the Bronx identifying and supporting new economic development concepts addressing food justice;
  • Yoni Freedhof, a doctor from Toronto making obesity his most important health concern;
  • Gary Paul Nabhan, a nationally known Vermont writer on the subject of local food, and a leader in understanding the links between biodiversity and cultural diversity;
  • Karen Washington, a native of the Bronx, a community gardener and activist turning empty lots into flourishing mini-farms, as a way to bring local and healthy food into her community.

They were all inspiration for what can be done now in a world demanding change in food sustainability.

[caption id="attachment_2642" align="alignnone" width="518"]P1020092 Student farmers from the Farmer Training Program at UVM[/caption]

Farms in Vermont to the Rest of the World
It couldn’t have been more fitting that what was waiting for me outside the Royall Tyler Theater was the fresh lettuce, kale and garlic ramps at UVM’s own farm program kiosk, with the smiling faces of area students, to wish me well as I left the Summit. What better take-away than an armful of local produce! Thank you, University of Vermont, for a grounded and thought-provoking two days. Besides the genuine information I came away with about the national and international food systems that we will have to change, I was struck with the fact that Vermont represents much of what is best in the new paradigm of local and organic. If we can export what we’ve learned on hardscrabble farms in Vermont to the rest of the world, we can effect important change, I’m sure of it! 

A Bientot,

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2 Responses to “The Spirit of Vermont at the 2013 UVM Food Sustainability Summit”

  1. Judith Janone says:

    An informative report on he conference, Interesting reading.

  2. Will says:

    Wouldn’t it be nice if other states were as enlightened.

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