A culinary online center dedicated to promoting the importance and the joy of American home cooking with an emphasis on local products and talent, celebrating the unique spirit and energy of the new food world ethos, especially in Vermont.

amuse bouche

I love quotes that add meaning to my life. Here are a few to live by:

Approach love and cooking with reckless abandon.
—The Dalai Lama

Rhubarb is a metaphor for finding happiness in your own backyard.
—Garrison Keillor

Buy your snacks from a farmers’ market.
—Michael Pollan

Even when he had a garden in Paris, Thomas Jefferson cultivated Indian corn, “to eat green in our manner, …as quickly after it left the stalk as possible.
—Evan Jones, from American Food

This is Not a Gardening Blog II

In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Kale transplant

My short life as a food grower is already full of drama. I have mourned my setbacks and celebrated small victories.

Setbacks: ALL my lettuce starts died. EVERY. SINGLE. ONE. fizzled out after two short days of spindly growth. Despite lettuce’s inability to emotionally bond with me, I felt responsible for their little lives; I felt sad like I would if I had a fish and it died. I also felt discouraged, like maybe starting from seeds is not a skill I was born with.

Sad lettuce

In attempted resourcefulness, I started my seeds in egg crates. Theoretically, this is a great idea, as the egg carton naturally decomposes and can be transplanted with the baby plant. Why did they die? Bacteria in the egg crate? Not enough soil? Smothered with LOVE? I think it was a combination of the intensity of my grow light (lettuce doesn’t like direct sun) and the tiny egg carton size. I restarted them in larger starter pots, about the size of 1/2 cup, and placed them in a softly lit window. I am happy to say they are now thriving.

New plants

Victories: My raised garden beds!  It was easy to decide what to fill them with: compost. Ask any gardener, and they sing the praises of compost. It’s available for a wide range of prices, starting at $45/cubic yard on Craigslist, all the way up to $203/cubic yard from the Vermont Compost Company. By going the thrifty route, I was happy to support a local farm while saving some cash.

Planters

Insider tip: the Gardener’s Supply Company has a handy online tool to calculate how much grow medium you will need, click here to check it out!

farm

A fourth generation dairy farmer named Alex was kind enough to deliver it. This kept my husband happy by saving his shiny red truck the torture of carting around composted cow pies. Thibault Farms in Colchester has been a part of Alex’s family for 100 years. This is his first year offering compost, and he is eager to expand with other topsoil options in the future. With no website for me to direct you to, all I can say is keep an eye out for him on Craiglist next year!

cow

Posted: 5-13-2017

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Kale transplant My short life as a food grower is already full of drama. I have mourned my setbacks and celebrated small victories. Setbacks: ALL my lettuce starts died. EVERY. SINGLE. ONE. fizzled out after two short days of spindly growth. Despite lettuce's inability to emotionally bond with me, I felt responsible for their little lives; I felt sad like I would if I had a fish and it died. I also felt discouraged, like maybe starting from seeds is not a skill I was born with. Sad lettuce In attempted resourcefulness, I started my seeds in egg crates. Theoretically, this is a great idea, as the egg carton naturally decomposes and can be transplanted with the baby plant. Why did they die? Bacteria in the egg crate? Not enough soil? Smothered with LOVE? I think it was a combination of the intensity of my grow light (lettuce doesn't like direct sun) and the tiny egg carton size. I restarted them in larger starter pots, about the size of 1/2 cup, and placed them in a softly lit window. I am happy to say they are now thriving. New plants Victories: My raised garden beds!  It was easy to decide what to fill them with: compost. Ask any gardener, and they sing the praises of compost. It's available for a wide range of prices, starting at $45/cubic yard on Craigslist, all the way up to $203/cubic yard from the Vermont Compost Company. By going the thrifty route, I was happy to support a local farm while saving some cash. Planters Insider tip: the Gardener's Supply Company has a handy online tool to calculate how much grow medium you will need, click here to check it out! farm A fourth generation dairy farmer named Alex was kind enough to deliver it. This kept my husband happy by saving his shiny red truck the torture of carting around composted cow pies. Thibault Farms in Colchester has been a part of Alex's family for 100 years. This is his first year offering compost, and he is eager to expand with other topsoil options in the future. With no website for me to direct you to, all I can say is keep an eye out for him on Craiglist next year! cow" ["post_title"]=> string(31) "This is Not a Gardening Blog II" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(31) "this-is-not-a-gardening-blog-ii" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(101) " http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/blog/new-guest-writer-welcome-corrie-to-the-green-mountain-state/" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-05-28 16:44:22" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-28 16:44:22" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=4226" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["queried_object"]=> object(WP_Post)#370 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(4226) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-13 08:00:26" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-13 08:00:26" ["post_content"]=> string(4232) "

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Kale transplant My short life as a food grower is already full of drama. I have mourned my setbacks and celebrated small victories. Setbacks: ALL my lettuce starts died. EVERY. SINGLE. ONE. fizzled out after two short days of spindly growth. Despite lettuce's inability to emotionally bond with me, I felt responsible for their little lives; I felt sad like I would if I had a fish and it died. I also felt discouraged, like maybe starting from seeds is not a skill I was born with. Sad lettuce In attempted resourcefulness, I started my seeds in egg crates. Theoretically, this is a great idea, as the egg carton naturally decomposes and can be transplanted with the baby plant. Why did they die? Bacteria in the egg crate? Not enough soil? Smothered with LOVE? I think it was a combination of the intensity of my grow light (lettuce doesn't like direct sun) and the tiny egg carton size. I restarted them in larger starter pots, about the size of 1/2 cup, and placed them in a softly lit window. I am happy to say they are now thriving. New plants Victories: My raised garden beds!  It was easy to decide what to fill them with: compost. Ask any gardener, and they sing the praises of compost. It's available for a wide range of prices, starting at $45/cubic yard on Craigslist, all the way up to $203/cubic yard from the Vermont Compost Company. By going the thrifty route, I was happy to support a local farm while saving some cash. Planters Insider tip: the Gardener's Supply Company has a handy online tool to calculate how much grow medium you will need, click here to check it out! farm A fourth generation dairy farmer named Alex was kind enough to deliver it. This kept my husband happy by saving his shiny red truck the torture of carting around composted cow pies. Thibault Farms in Colchester has been a part of Alex's family for 100 years. This is his first year offering compost, and he is eager to expand with other topsoil options in the future. With no website for me to direct you to, all I can say is keep an eye out for him on Craiglist next year! cow" ["post_title"]=> string(31) "This is Not a Gardening Blog II" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(31) "this-is-not-a-gardening-blog-ii" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(101) " http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/blog/new-guest-writer-welcome-corrie-to-the-green-mountain-state/" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-05-28 16:44:22" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-28 16:44:22" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=4226" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["queried_object_id"]=> int(4226) }
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