A culinary online center dedicated to promoting the importance and the joy of American home cooking with an emphasis on local products and talent, celebrating the unique spirit and energy of the new food world ethos, especially in Vermont.

amuse bouche

I love quotes that add meaning to my life. Here are a few to live by:

Americans who have been to France and come home craving a reminder of their magical European experience, love Vermont cheeses.
—Allison Hooper, founder, VT Butter & Cheese Creamery

Practice not cleaning your plate: it will help you eat less in short term and develop self-control in the long term.
—Michael Pollan

Sweet taste buds develop before all others, that’s why small children love sweets.
—Bronwyn Dunne

Don’t eat breakfast cereals that change the color of milk.
—Michael Pollan

My rule of thumb is, when in doubt, cook more than you think you may need.
—Marian Cunningham, from Learning to Cook


A Day of Dining in New Orleans

In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Oyster top view

I recently spent five days wandering the streets of N’awlins with a good friend. It was the type of vacation where our biggest concern each day was where we would eat our next meal.  We made some excellent choices, but if I had only one day of dining in that city, I would spend it like this:

Wake up early to snag a coffee at French Truck Coffee.  This small scale coffee shop has a handful of locations in New Orleans and Memphis.  With a focus on small batches of freshly roasted, sustainably sourced beans, its no wonder this place is the best coffee shop in town.  For a taste of local flair, try the New Orleans Iced Coffee: iced coffee with chicory, prepared with cream and sugar.

French Truck

For breakfast, head to Willa Jean in the Central Business District, lovingly referred to by locals as the “CBD.”  Willa Jean celebrates Southern cuisine using fresh, local ingredients. Our server, a woman who exuded southern charm, was dressed like her counterparts in a gingham button-down shirt and jeans.  Even though I was not nursing a hangover, the “Hangover Breakfast” sounded too delicious to pass up: tasty grits topped with braised lamb and a poached egg. I had them add some braised collard greens, and we were in business!  They also have a walk-up counter with grab-n-go sandwiches and other bakery items if you are in a time crunch.

Willa Jean

Head to the other side of town for lunch at the Joint.  We didn’t know until after we got home that in 2008, the Joint was featured on the Food Network program “Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives.”  They are also on multiple “Top 10 BBQ” lists, including Zagat’s.  The service is quick and the food is delicious.  With a slightly “dive-y” atmosphere, this place has a full service bar and a nice little patio.  I indulged in the pulled pork with a side of coleslaw and potato salad.

the Joint

As an afternoon snack, not that anyone could possibly still be hungry, I would make my way to the Blind Pelican for happy hour oysters.  You can’t go to New Orleans and not indulge in some oysters.  Even my non-oyster-loving travel companion enjoyed the charbroiled oysters here.  During their 3pm-8pm happy hour, they serve a dozen oysters on the half-shell for only $3, or 6 charbroiled oysters for $5.  With 50 beers on tap and a full service bar, everyone should leave here happy.

Oyster side view

Get dinner in the up-and-coming warehouse district at Cochon Butcher, the creative child-restaurant of Cochon, located next door.  Cochon opened its doors just months after Hurricane Katrina ravaged New Orleans in 2006.  Due to the quality of their creative spin on Cajun cooking, they have been talk of the town ever since.  They opened their deli-style Butcher in 2009.  We enjoyed the Saturday special of fried chicken with a side of braised mustard greens and potato salad.  Butcher modernizes the old-world meat market and does all their curing in-house.

Butcher

If not in a food coma, take your party to Bacchanal for an after dinner cocktail.  Although Bacchanal is a wine shop, they make the tastiest cocktails in the city.  New Orleans is the birth city of my two favorite cocktails: the Sazerac and the Vieux Carre.  Somewhat surprisingly, for a wine bar, this place does them best.  Every evening, weather permitting, they host live music on their beautiful back patio.

bacchanal

If given more time, I would revisit:

  • The family owned and operated Ruby Slipper Café, which was inspired “by a powerful sense of homecoming when returning to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina,” much like Dorothy’s ruby slippers.  They serve an excellent eggs benedict and house-made bloody mary.
  • Paladar 511 serves a seasonal menu with locally grown ingredients.  Nothing on their menu will disappoint.
  • EAT New Orleans, a local spot with a, no joke, BYOB policy.  Focused on seasonal and local ingredients, they served one of the best breakfasts I had on the trip.
  • You don’t go to New Orleans and expect to find great Isreali food, but Shaya is a real treat! It was a great recommendation from an Uber driver. Just be sure to make a reservation.  This place is no secret!

You cannot visit a place like New Orleans without celebrating the local cuisine.  One of my main motivators for travel is the local food. However, something I noticed in New Orleans dining was the serious lack of vegetables.  I enjoyed my taste of southern cooking, but I am glad to be back HOME with delicious and nutritious creations of my own!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

Posted: 5-27-2017

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Oyster top view

I recently spent five days wandering the streets of N'awlins with a good friend. It was the type of vacation where our biggest concern each day was where we would eat our next meal.  We made some excellent choices, but if I had only one day of dining in that city, I would spend it like this:

Wake up early to snag a coffee at French Truck Coffee.  This small scale coffee shop has a handful of locations in New Orleans and Memphis.  With a focus on small batches of freshly roasted, sustainably sourced beans, its no wonder this place is the best coffee shop in town.  For a taste of local flair, try the New Orleans Iced Coffee: iced coffee with chicory, prepared with cream and sugar.

French Truck

For breakfast, head to Willa Jean in the Central Business District, lovingly referred to by locals as the "CBD."  Willa Jean celebrates Southern cuisine using fresh, local ingredients. Our server, a woman who exuded southern charm, was dressed like her counterparts in a gingham button-down shirt and jeans.  Even though I was not nursing a hangover, the "Hangover Breakfast" sounded too delicious to pass up: tasty grits topped with braised lamb and a poached egg. I had them add some braised collard greens, and we were in business!  They also have a walk-up counter with grab-n-go sandwiches and other bakery items if you are in a time crunch.

Willa Jean

Head to the other side of town for lunch at the Joint.  We didn't know until after we got home that in 2008, the Joint was featured on the Food Network program "Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives."  They are also on multiple "Top 10 BBQ" lists, including Zagat's.  The service is quick and the food is delicious.  With a slightly "dive-y" atmosphere, this place has a full service bar and a nice little patio.  I indulged in the pulled pork with a side of coleslaw and potato salad.

the Joint

As an afternoon snack, not that anyone could possibly still be hungry, I would make my way to the Blind Pelican for happy hour oysters.  You can't go to New Orleans and not indulge in some oysters.  Even my non-oyster-loving travel companion enjoyed the charbroiled oysters here.  During their 3pm-8pm happy hour, they serve a dozen oysters on the half-shell for only $3, or 6 charbroiled oysters for $5.  With 50 beers on tap and a full service bar, everyone should leave here happy.

Oyster side view

Get dinner in the up-and-coming warehouse district at Cochon Butcher, the creative child-restaurant of Cochon, located next door.  Cochon opened its doors just months after Hurricane Katrina ravaged New Orleans in 2006.  Due to the quality of their creative spin on Cajun cooking, they have been talk of the town ever since.  They opened their deli-style Butcher in 2009.  We enjoyed the Saturday special of fried chicken with a side of braised mustard greens and potato salad.  Butcher modernizes the old-world meat market and does all their curing in-house.

Butcher

If not in a food coma, take your party to Bacchanal for an after dinner cocktail.  Although Bacchanal is a wine shop, they make the tastiest cocktails in the city.  New Orleans is the birth city of my two favorite cocktails: the Sazerac and the Vieux Carre.  Somewhat surprisingly, for a wine bar, this place does them best.  Every evening, weather permitting, they host live music on their beautiful back patio.

bacchanal

If given more time, I would revisit:

  • The family owned and operated Ruby Slipper Café, which was inspired "by a powerful sense of homecoming when returning to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina," much like Dorothy's ruby slippers.  They serve an excellent eggs benedict and house-made bloody mary.
  • Paladar 511 serves a seasonal menu with locally grown ingredients.  Nothing on their menu will disappoint.
  • EAT New Orleans, a local spot with a, no joke, BYOB policy.  Focused on seasonal and local ingredients, they served one of the best breakfasts I had on the trip.
  • You don't go to New Orleans and expect to find great Isreali food, but Shaya is a real treat! It was a great recommendation from an Uber driver. Just be sure to make a reservation.  This place is no secret!
You cannot visit a place like New Orleans without celebrating the local cuisine.  One of my main motivators for travel is the local food. However, something I noticed in New Orleans dining was the serious lack of vegetables.  I enjoyed my taste of southern cooking, but I am glad to be back HOME with delicious and nutritious creations of my own!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

palm close up Fiddleheads are one of the first symbols of Spring for Vermonters.  I recently enjoyed my first experience with them, and oh my, what a treat!  With a lightning fast harvest, these little gems can disappear before you know it.  Get them while you can!  Both beautiful and delicious, they are an excellent addition to any meal.  With a nutty and mellow flavor, fiddleheads are reminiscent of asparagus. However, their interior is more firm than asparagus, and they don't come with that other, rather awkward, side effect of asparagus we all know about… bowl o greens I bought my fiddleheads at Lantman's in Hinesburg for $7.99/lb.  The cost alone is enough to inspire you to do your own wild fern foraging.  If you decide to go on your own, take an experienced guide for your first couple of ventures, as there is a poisonous lookalike you don’t want to eat. Close up They are naturally covered with a brown, papery coating.  This brown material is the cocoon from which the ferns emerge like little butterflies.  It is easy rinsed off with water.  I filled a bowl with water and gently rubbed the fiddleheads between my hands to break them free.  I decided to go simple with butter, garlic, and lemon; a preparation that celebrates the flavor while also being very difficult to NOT enjoy. greens Ingredients: 3/4 lb Fiddleheads 1 1/2 Tbsp Butter 3-5 Cloves of Chopped Garlic 1 Lemon sliced into 1/4 inch discs Salt to taste Pepper to taste ingredients Preparation: Prepare your fiddleheads by rinsing off the brown casing.  They do not require any cutting or slicing.  Melt the butter in a saucepan over medium heat.  Once heated, add the garlic and sautée for two minutes, stirring regularly.  Add the ferns and cover for 5-7 minutes, stirring occasionally.  Add half the lemon wheels, salt, and pepper.  Stir occasionally for another 3-5 minutes or until they turn into a slightly dull shade of green.  Serve immediately and top with remaining lemon wheels as garnish.  ENJOY! fry pan I served mine with roasted sweet mama squash and pork tenderloin, washed down with a delicious and local Mountain Ale by The Shed brewery. dinner plate

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Kale transplant My short life as a food grower is already full of drama. I have mourned my setbacks and celebrated small victories. Setbacks: ALL my lettuce starts died. EVERY. SINGLE. ONE. fizzled out after two short days of spindly growth. Despite lettuce's inability to emotionally bond with me, I felt responsible for their little lives; I felt sad like I would if I had a fish and it died. I also felt discouraged, like maybe starting from seeds is not a skill I was born with. Sad lettuce In attempted resourcefulness, I started my seeds in egg crates. Theoretically, this is a great idea, as the egg carton naturally decomposes and can be transplanted with the baby plant. Why did they die? Bacteria in the egg crate? Not enough soil? Smothered with LOVE? I think it was a combination of the intensity of my grow light (lettuce doesn't like direct sun) and the tiny egg carton size. I restarted them in larger starter pots, about the size of 1/2 cup, and placed them in a softly lit window. I am happy to say they are now thriving. New plants Victories: My raised garden beds!  It was easy to decide what to fill them with: compost. Ask any gardener, and they sing the praises of compost. It's available for a wide range of prices, starting at $45/cubic yard on Craigslist, all the way up to $203/cubic yard from the Vermont Compost Company. By going the thrifty route, I was happy to support a local farm while saving some cash. Planters Insider tip: the Gardener's Supply Company has a handy online tool to calculate how much grow medium you will need, click here to check it out! farm A fourth generation dairy farmer named Alex was kind enough to deliver it. This kept my husband happy by saving his shiny red truck the torture of carting around composted cow pies. Thibault Farms in Colchester has been a part of Alex's family for 100 years. This is his first year offering compost, and he is eager to expand with other topsoil options in the future. With no website for me to direct you to, all I can say is keep an eye out for him on Craiglist next year! cow" ["post_title"]=> string(31) "This is Not a Gardening Blog II" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(31) "this-is-not-a-gardening-blog-ii" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(101) " http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/blog/new-guest-writer-welcome-corrie-to-the-green-mountain-state/" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-05-28 16:44:22" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-28 16:44:22" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=4226" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#234 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(4198) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-06 08:00:53" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-06 08:00:53" ["post_content"]=> string(4171) "

In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Apple on tray

Growing up in the Pacific Northwest with varietals like Gala, Braeburn, and Fuji, my taste buds have been thoroughly enjoying the new-ness of the McIntosh and Empire apples that are popular in Vermont. Apples are so versatile; I prepare them on salad, in soup, with cheese or peanut butter, sautéed with cabbage and onion, etc ect ect...you get the idea! But applesauce, despite its simplicity, is something I have never made from scratch! Until now…

Apples on window

I am partial to Champlain Orchards brown-bagged apples; I buy them for $1.49/lb at Lantman's Market in Hinesburg. I was in a total rush to get groceries the other day, so I did not go through my normal routine of carefully inspecting each tote of apples to find the perfect bag. When I ended up with a bag of mushy, beaten, bruised, and otherwise sad apples, I regretted my hastiness.  I turned my disappointment into opportunity and inspiration - APPLESAUCE. No food goes to waste in my home!

Ingredients

I cruised the internet and found many recipes and methods.   They varied slightly in water content, some even recommend using a pressure cooker, but they all boil down (pun intended!) to the same thing: peel, cut, boil, shmoosh. What I found surprising, and the apples should find insulting, is that EVERY RECIPE I FOUND called for sugar! As if apples weren't sweet enough? I was shocked! I chose firmly to NOT add sugar. I had McIntosh apples, and they're sweet enough on their own! The spread I peeled my 13 small(ish) apples, and put them in a pot with 1/2 c. water, a pinch of salt, allspice, and cinnamon. I puttered around the kitchen finishing my meal prep for the week, stirring occasionally, until Voila! The most delicious applesauce I have ever tasted. Really! I can admit when my kitchen creations fall short of praise, and this stuff was amazing. It took around 30-40 min for me to notice that when I stirred, I had no more chunks! No shmooshing necessary! My applesauce inspired my lunch for the week: pork loin with applesauce and mustard, served with a side of green beans.  YUMM!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Lawn Shit This is a blog about local Vermont Food, and how much more local can you get than your own backyard?  Embracing Vermont's archetypically local-frame-of-mind, I am starting a garden. Being as I have spent my young adult years bouncing from apartment to apartment, mostly in the urban center of Portland, OR, the closest I have come to maintaining my own garden is the summer I grew cherry tomatoes and cilantro plants on my fire escape "patio."  Although I no longer live downtown, I still live in an apartment.  Thankfully, my landlord, aka my father-in-law, will let me plant a garden! Wood Cutting I have decided to build raised beds, and for the following reasons: 1. It delineates a private area in an otherwise publicly shared yard space 2. It's pretty 3. It's good for the plants!  We get some chilly weather here, we had snow twice in April this year; raised beds allow the soil to heat up faster and stay warmer; we also live on a hill, so this will help manage the water drainage. Level beds I bought my seeds and a grow light at the Gardener's Supply Company a couple weeks ago.  It's my new favorite place.  It's like Cheers: the manager remembered me and helped me find the woman I worked with on my first visit.  We took off again like old friends.  Her name is Betsy, and she is WONDERFUL at her job.  She's got loads of experience and is bubbling to share it. Bonus: Gardener's Supply Company is employee-owned and has it's headquarters in Burlington! s I picked out seed packets of all my favorite vegetables, and Betsy helped me edit down to the plants that are more likely to be successful if starting from seed and growing in Vermont.  I went home with: kale, red lettuce, zucchini, delicata squash, carrot, and beet seeds.  Poetically, I planted my seeds on Earth Day!  My dining room has become my nursery; I plan to transplant into my outdoor beds Memorial Day weekend, as per my new friend, Betsy's, suggestion. [caption id="attachment_4208" align="aligncenter" width="520"]deck Nothing caps off the perfect day spent outside working like a cold Lawson's "Sip of Sunshine" on the patio.[/caption]

I am under the impression that if my garden is successful, I will gain special access to a secret and elite group of hardcore Vermonters who grow all sorts of things here, despite the short growing season and late frosts.  I want IN!  I'm sure it won't be my dream garden right out of the gates, but I am prepared for all sorts of learning experiences along the journey.  Stay tuned!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Oyster top view

I recently spent five days wandering the streets of N'awlins with a good friend. It was the type of vacation where our biggest concern each day was where we would eat our next meal.  We made some excellent choices, but if I had only one day of dining in that city, I would spend it like this:

Wake up early to snag a coffee at French Truck Coffee.  This small scale coffee shop has a handful of locations in New Orleans and Memphis.  With a focus on small batches of freshly roasted, sustainably sourced beans, its no wonder this place is the best coffee shop in town.  For a taste of local flair, try the New Orleans Iced Coffee: iced coffee with chicory, prepared with cream and sugar.

French Truck

For breakfast, head to Willa Jean in the Central Business District, lovingly referred to by locals as the "CBD."  Willa Jean celebrates Southern cuisine using fresh, local ingredients. Our server, a woman who exuded southern charm, was dressed like her counterparts in a gingham button-down shirt and jeans.  Even though I was not nursing a hangover, the "Hangover Breakfast" sounded too delicious to pass up: tasty grits topped with braised lamb and a poached egg. I had them add some braised collard greens, and we were in business!  They also have a walk-up counter with grab-n-go sandwiches and other bakery items if you are in a time crunch.

Willa Jean

Head to the other side of town for lunch at the Joint.  We didn't know until after we got home that in 2008, the Joint was featured on the Food Network program "Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives."  They are also on multiple "Top 10 BBQ" lists, including Zagat's.  The service is quick and the food is delicious.  With a slightly "dive-y" atmosphere, this place has a full service bar and a nice little patio.  I indulged in the pulled pork with a side of coleslaw and potato salad.

the Joint

As an afternoon snack, not that anyone could possibly still be hungry, I would make my way to the Blind Pelican for happy hour oysters.  You can't go to New Orleans and not indulge in some oysters.  Even my non-oyster-loving travel companion enjoyed the charbroiled oysters here.  During their 3pm-8pm happy hour, they serve a dozen oysters on the half-shell for only $3, or 6 charbroiled oysters for $5.  With 50 beers on tap and a full service bar, everyone should leave here happy.

Oyster side view

Get dinner in the up-and-coming warehouse district at Cochon Butcher, the creative child-restaurant of Cochon, located next door.  Cochon opened its doors just months after Hurricane Katrina ravaged New Orleans in 2006.  Due to the quality of their creative spin on Cajun cooking, they have been talk of the town ever since.  They opened their deli-style Butcher in 2009.  We enjoyed the Saturday special of fried chicken with a side of braised mustard greens and potato salad.  Butcher modernizes the old-world meat market and does all their curing in-house.

Butcher

If not in a food coma, take your party to Bacchanal for an after dinner cocktail.  Although Bacchanal is a wine shop, they make the tastiest cocktails in the city.  New Orleans is the birth city of my two favorite cocktails: the Sazerac and the Vieux Carre.  Somewhat surprisingly, for a wine bar, this place does them best.  Every evening, weather permitting, they host live music on their beautiful back patio.

bacchanal

If given more time, I would revisit:

  • The family owned and operated Ruby Slipper Café, which was inspired "by a powerful sense of homecoming when returning to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina," much like Dorothy's ruby slippers.  They serve an excellent eggs benedict and house-made bloody mary.
  • Paladar 511 serves a seasonal menu with locally grown ingredients.  Nothing on their menu will disappoint.
  • EAT New Orleans, a local spot with a, no joke, BYOB policy.  Focused on seasonal and local ingredients, they served one of the best breakfasts I had on the trip.
  • You don't go to New Orleans and expect to find great Isreali food, but Shaya is a real treat! It was a great recommendation from an Uber driver. Just be sure to make a reservation.  This place is no secret!
You cannot visit a place like New Orleans without celebrating the local cuisine.  One of my main motivators for travel is the local food. However, something I noticed in New Orleans dining was the serious lack of vegetables.  I enjoyed my taste of southern cooking, but I am glad to be back HOME with delicious and nutritious creations of my own!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

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Sautéed Fiddleheads in Butter with Lemon and Garlic

In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

palm close up

Fiddleheads are one of the first symbols of Spring for Vermonters.  I recently enjoyed my first experience with them, and oh my, what a treat!  With a lightning fast harvest, these little gems can disappear before you know it.  Get them while you can!  Both beautiful and delicious, they are an excellent addition to any meal.  With a nutty and mellow flavor, fiddleheads are reminiscent of asparagus. However, their interior is more firm than asparagus, and they don’t come with that other, rather awkward, side effect of asparagus we all know about…

bowl o greens

I bought my fiddleheads at Lantman’s in Hinesburg for $7.99/lb.  The cost alone is enough to inspire you to do your own wild fern foraging.  If you decide to go on your own, take an experienced guide for your first couple of ventures, as there is a poisonous lookalike you don’t want to eat.

Close up

They are naturally covered with a brown, papery coating.  This brown material is the cocoon from which the ferns emerge like little butterflies.  It is easy rinsed off with water.  I filled a bowl with water and gently rubbed the fiddleheads between my hands to break them free.  I decided to go simple with butter, garlic, and lemon; a preparation that celebrates the flavor while also being very difficult to NOT enjoy.

greens

Ingredients:

3/4 lb Fiddleheads

1 1/2 Tbsp Butter

3-5 Cloves of Chopped Garlic

1 Lemon sliced into 1/4 inch discs

Salt to taste

Pepper to taste

ingredients

Preparation:

Prepare your fiddleheads by rinsing off the brown casing.  They do not require any cutting or slicing.  Melt the butter in a saucepan over medium heat.  Once heated, add the garlic and sautée for two minutes, stirring regularly.  Add the ferns and cover for 5-7 minutes, stirring occasionally.  Add half the lemon wheels, salt, and pepper.  Stir occasionally for another 3-5 minutes or until they turn into a slightly dull shade of green.  Serve immediately and top with remaining lemon wheels as garnish.  ENJOY!

fry pan

I served mine with roasted sweet mama squash and pork tenderloin, washed down with a delicious and local Mountain Ale by The Shed brewery.

dinner plate

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

Posted: 5-20-2017

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Oyster top view

I recently spent five days wandering the streets of N'awlins with a good friend. It was the type of vacation where our biggest concern each day was where we would eat our next meal.  We made some excellent choices, but if I had only one day of dining in that city, I would spend it like this:

Wake up early to snag a coffee at French Truck Coffee.  This small scale coffee shop has a handful of locations in New Orleans and Memphis.  With a focus on small batches of freshly roasted, sustainably sourced beans, its no wonder this place is the best coffee shop in town.  For a taste of local flair, try the New Orleans Iced Coffee: iced coffee with chicory, prepared with cream and sugar.

French Truck

For breakfast, head to Willa Jean in the Central Business District, lovingly referred to by locals as the "CBD."  Willa Jean celebrates Southern cuisine using fresh, local ingredients. Our server, a woman who exuded southern charm, was dressed like her counterparts in a gingham button-down shirt and jeans.  Even though I was not nursing a hangover, the "Hangover Breakfast" sounded too delicious to pass up: tasty grits topped with braised lamb and a poached egg. I had them add some braised collard greens, and we were in business!  They also have a walk-up counter with grab-n-go sandwiches and other bakery items if you are in a time crunch.

Willa Jean

Head to the other side of town for lunch at the Joint.  We didn't know until after we got home that in 2008, the Joint was featured on the Food Network program "Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives."  They are also on multiple "Top 10 BBQ" lists, including Zagat's.  The service is quick and the food is delicious.  With a slightly "dive-y" atmosphere, this place has a full service bar and a nice little patio.  I indulged in the pulled pork with a side of coleslaw and potato salad.

the Joint

As an afternoon snack, not that anyone could possibly still be hungry, I would make my way to the Blind Pelican for happy hour oysters.  You can't go to New Orleans and not indulge in some oysters.  Even my non-oyster-loving travel companion enjoyed the charbroiled oysters here.  During their 3pm-8pm happy hour, they serve a dozen oysters on the half-shell for only $3, or 6 charbroiled oysters for $5.  With 50 beers on tap and a full service bar, everyone should leave here happy.

Oyster side view

Get dinner in the up-and-coming warehouse district at Cochon Butcher, the creative child-restaurant of Cochon, located next door.  Cochon opened its doors just months after Hurricane Katrina ravaged New Orleans in 2006.  Due to the quality of their creative spin on Cajun cooking, they have been talk of the town ever since.  They opened their deli-style Butcher in 2009.  We enjoyed the Saturday special of fried chicken with a side of braised mustard greens and potato salad.  Butcher modernizes the old-world meat market and does all their curing in-house.

Butcher

If not in a food coma, take your party to Bacchanal for an after dinner cocktail.  Although Bacchanal is a wine shop, they make the tastiest cocktails in the city.  New Orleans is the birth city of my two favorite cocktails: the Sazerac and the Vieux Carre.  Somewhat surprisingly, for a wine bar, this place does them best.  Every evening, weather permitting, they host live music on their beautiful back patio.

bacchanal

If given more time, I would revisit:

  • The family owned and operated Ruby Slipper Café, which was inspired "by a powerful sense of homecoming when returning to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina," much like Dorothy's ruby slippers.  They serve an excellent eggs benedict and house-made bloody mary.
  • Paladar 511 serves a seasonal menu with locally grown ingredients.  Nothing on their menu will disappoint.
  • EAT New Orleans, a local spot with a, no joke, BYOB policy.  Focused on seasonal and local ingredients, they served one of the best breakfasts I had on the trip.
  • You don't go to New Orleans and expect to find great Isreali food, but Shaya is a real treat! It was a great recommendation from an Uber driver. Just be sure to make a reservation.  This place is no secret!
You cannot visit a place like New Orleans without celebrating the local cuisine.  One of my main motivators for travel is the local food. However, something I noticed in New Orleans dining was the serious lack of vegetables.  I enjoyed my taste of southern cooking, but I am glad to be back HOME with delicious and nutritious creations of my own!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

palm close up Fiddleheads are one of the first symbols of Spring for Vermonters.  I recently enjoyed my first experience with them, and oh my, what a treat!  With a lightning fast harvest, these little gems can disappear before you know it.  Get them while you can!  Both beautiful and delicious, they are an excellent addition to any meal.  With a nutty and mellow flavor, fiddleheads are reminiscent of asparagus. However, their interior is more firm than asparagus, and they don't come with that other, rather awkward, side effect of asparagus we all know about… bowl o greens I bought my fiddleheads at Lantman's in Hinesburg for $7.99/lb.  The cost alone is enough to inspire you to do your own wild fern foraging.  If you decide to go on your own, take an experienced guide for your first couple of ventures, as there is a poisonous lookalike you don’t want to eat. Close up They are naturally covered with a brown, papery coating.  This brown material is the cocoon from which the ferns emerge like little butterflies.  It is easy rinsed off with water.  I filled a bowl with water and gently rubbed the fiddleheads between my hands to break them free.  I decided to go simple with butter, garlic, and lemon; a preparation that celebrates the flavor while also being very difficult to NOT enjoy. greens Ingredients: 3/4 lb Fiddleheads 1 1/2 Tbsp Butter 3-5 Cloves of Chopped Garlic 1 Lemon sliced into 1/4 inch discs Salt to taste Pepper to taste ingredients Preparation: Prepare your fiddleheads by rinsing off the brown casing.  They do not require any cutting or slicing.  Melt the butter in a saucepan over medium heat.  Once heated, add the garlic and sautée for two minutes, stirring regularly.  Add the ferns and cover for 5-7 minutes, stirring occasionally.  Add half the lemon wheels, salt, and pepper.  Stir occasionally for another 3-5 minutes or until they turn into a slightly dull shade of green.  Serve immediately and top with remaining lemon wheels as garnish.  ENJOY! fry pan I served mine with roasted sweet mama squash and pork tenderloin, washed down with a delicious and local Mountain Ale by The Shed brewery. dinner plate

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Kale transplant My short life as a food grower is already full of drama. I have mourned my setbacks and celebrated small victories. Setbacks: ALL my lettuce starts died. EVERY. SINGLE. ONE. fizzled out after two short days of spindly growth. Despite lettuce's inability to emotionally bond with me, I felt responsible for their little lives; I felt sad like I would if I had a fish and it died. I also felt discouraged, like maybe starting from seeds is not a skill I was born with. Sad lettuce In attempted resourcefulness, I started my seeds in egg crates. Theoretically, this is a great idea, as the egg carton naturally decomposes and can be transplanted with the baby plant. Why did they die? Bacteria in the egg crate? Not enough soil? Smothered with LOVE? I think it was a combination of the intensity of my grow light (lettuce doesn't like direct sun) and the tiny egg carton size. I restarted them in larger starter pots, about the size of 1/2 cup, and placed them in a softly lit window. I am happy to say they are now thriving. New plants Victories: My raised garden beds!  It was easy to decide what to fill them with: compost. Ask any gardener, and they sing the praises of compost. It's available for a wide range of prices, starting at $45/cubic yard on Craigslist, all the way up to $203/cubic yard from the Vermont Compost Company. By going the thrifty route, I was happy to support a local farm while saving some cash. Planters Insider tip: the Gardener's Supply Company has a handy online tool to calculate how much grow medium you will need, click here to check it out! farm A fourth generation dairy farmer named Alex was kind enough to deliver it. This kept my husband happy by saving his shiny red truck the torture of carting around composted cow pies. Thibault Farms in Colchester has been a part of Alex's family for 100 years. This is his first year offering compost, and he is eager to expand with other topsoil options in the future. With no website for me to direct you to, all I can say is keep an eye out for him on Craiglist next year! cow" ["post_title"]=> string(31) "This is Not a Gardening Blog II" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(31) "this-is-not-a-gardening-blog-ii" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(101) " http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/blog/new-guest-writer-welcome-corrie-to-the-green-mountain-state/" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-05-28 16:44:22" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-28 16:44:22" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=4226" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#234 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(4198) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-06 08:00:53" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-06 08:00:53" ["post_content"]=> string(4171) "

In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Apple on tray

Growing up in the Pacific Northwest with varietals like Gala, Braeburn, and Fuji, my taste buds have been thoroughly enjoying the new-ness of the McIntosh and Empire apples that are popular in Vermont. Apples are so versatile; I prepare them on salad, in soup, with cheese or peanut butter, sautéed with cabbage and onion, etc ect ect...you get the idea! But applesauce, despite its simplicity, is something I have never made from scratch! Until now…

Apples on window

I am partial to Champlain Orchards brown-bagged apples; I buy them for $1.49/lb at Lantman's Market in Hinesburg. I was in a total rush to get groceries the other day, so I did not go through my normal routine of carefully inspecting each tote of apples to find the perfect bag. When I ended up with a bag of mushy, beaten, bruised, and otherwise sad apples, I regretted my hastiness.  I turned my disappointment into opportunity and inspiration - APPLESAUCE. No food goes to waste in my home!

Ingredients

I cruised the internet and found many recipes and methods.   They varied slightly in water content, some even recommend using a pressure cooker, but they all boil down (pun intended!) to the same thing: peel, cut, boil, shmoosh. What I found surprising, and the apples should find insulting, is that EVERY RECIPE I FOUND called for sugar! As if apples weren't sweet enough? I was shocked! I chose firmly to NOT add sugar. I had McIntosh apples, and they're sweet enough on their own! The spread I peeled my 13 small(ish) apples, and put them in a pot with 1/2 c. water, a pinch of salt, allspice, and cinnamon. I puttered around the kitchen finishing my meal prep for the week, stirring occasionally, until Voila! The most delicious applesauce I have ever tasted. Really! I can admit when my kitchen creations fall short of praise, and this stuff was amazing. It took around 30-40 min for me to notice that when I stirred, I had no more chunks! No shmooshing necessary! My applesauce inspired my lunch for the week: pork loin with applesauce and mustard, served with a side of green beans.  YUMM!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Lawn Shit This is a blog about local Vermont Food, and how much more local can you get than your own backyard?  Embracing Vermont's archetypically local-frame-of-mind, I am starting a garden. Being as I have spent my young adult years bouncing from apartment to apartment, mostly in the urban center of Portland, OR, the closest I have come to maintaining my own garden is the summer I grew cherry tomatoes and cilantro plants on my fire escape "patio."  Although I no longer live downtown, I still live in an apartment.  Thankfully, my landlord, aka my father-in-law, will let me plant a garden! Wood Cutting I have decided to build raised beds, and for the following reasons: 1. It delineates a private area in an otherwise publicly shared yard space 2. It's pretty 3. It's good for the plants!  We get some chilly weather here, we had snow twice in April this year; raised beds allow the soil to heat up faster and stay warmer; we also live on a hill, so this will help manage the water drainage. Level beds I bought my seeds and a grow light at the Gardener's Supply Company a couple weeks ago.  It's my new favorite place.  It's like Cheers: the manager remembered me and helped me find the woman I worked with on my first visit.  We took off again like old friends.  Her name is Betsy, and she is WONDERFUL at her job.  She's got loads of experience and is bubbling to share it. Bonus: Gardener's Supply Company is employee-owned and has it's headquarters in Burlington! s I picked out seed packets of all my favorite vegetables, and Betsy helped me edit down to the plants that are more likely to be successful if starting from seed and growing in Vermont.  I went home with: kale, red lettuce, zucchini, delicata squash, carrot, and beet seeds.  Poetically, I planted my seeds on Earth Day!  My dining room has become my nursery; I plan to transplant into my outdoor beds Memorial Day weekend, as per my new friend, Betsy's, suggestion. [caption id="attachment_4208" align="aligncenter" width="520"]deck Nothing caps off the perfect day spent outside working like a cold Lawson's "Sip of Sunshine" on the patio.[/caption]

I am under the impression that if my garden is successful, I will gain special access to a secret and elite group of hardcore Vermonters who grow all sorts of things here, despite the short growing season and late frosts.  I want IN!  I'm sure it won't be my dream garden right out of the gates, but I am prepared for all sorts of learning experiences along the journey.  Stay tuned!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

palm close up Fiddleheads are one of the first symbols of Spring for Vermonters.  I recently enjoyed my first experience with them, and oh my, what a treat!  With a lightning fast harvest, these little gems can disappear before you know it.  Get them while you can!  Both beautiful and delicious, they are an excellent addition to any meal.  With a nutty and mellow flavor, fiddleheads are reminiscent of asparagus. However, their interior is more firm than asparagus, and they don't come with that other, rather awkward, side effect of asparagus we all know about… bowl o greens I bought my fiddleheads at Lantman's in Hinesburg for $7.99/lb.  The cost alone is enough to inspire you to do your own wild fern foraging.  If you decide to go on your own, take an experienced guide for your first couple of ventures, as there is a poisonous lookalike you don’t want to eat. Close up They are naturally covered with a brown, papery coating.  This brown material is the cocoon from which the ferns emerge like little butterflies.  It is easy rinsed off with water.  I filled a bowl with water and gently rubbed the fiddleheads between my hands to break them free.  I decided to go simple with butter, garlic, and lemon; a preparation that celebrates the flavor while also being very difficult to NOT enjoy. greens Ingredients: 3/4 lb Fiddleheads 1 1/2 Tbsp Butter 3-5 Cloves of Chopped Garlic 1 Lemon sliced into 1/4 inch discs Salt to taste Pepper to taste ingredients Preparation: Prepare your fiddleheads by rinsing off the brown casing.  They do not require any cutting or slicing.  Melt the butter in a saucepan over medium heat.  Once heated, add the garlic and sautée for two minutes, stirring regularly.  Add the ferns and cover for 5-7 minutes, stirring occasionally.  Add half the lemon wheels, salt, and pepper.  Stir occasionally for another 3-5 minutes or until they turn into a slightly dull shade of green.  Serve immediately and top with remaining lemon wheels as garnish.  ENJOY! fry pan I served mine with roasted sweet mama squash and pork tenderloin, washed down with a delicious and local Mountain Ale by The Shed brewery. dinner plate

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

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2 Responses to “Sautéed Fiddleheads in Butter with Lemon and Garlic”

  1. Kellie Kutkey says:

    I want to harvest them next spring. . . You make them look AMAZING

  2. For a new Vermonter you’re definitely taking to the local cuisine in and engaging way. I love the recipe and the photos are terrific! Can’t wait to see what your next food adventure will be….Thanks, Corrie!

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This is Not a Gardening Blog II

In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Kale transplant

My short life as a food grower is already full of drama. I have mourned my setbacks and celebrated small victories.

Setbacks: ALL my lettuce starts died. EVERY. SINGLE. ONE. fizzled out after two short days of spindly growth. Despite lettuce’s inability to emotionally bond with me, I felt responsible for their little lives; I felt sad like I would if I had a fish and it died. I also felt discouraged, like maybe starting from seeds is not a skill I was born with.

Sad lettuce

In attempted resourcefulness, I started my seeds in egg crates. Theoretically, this is a great idea, as the egg carton naturally decomposes and can be transplanted with the baby plant. Why did they die? Bacteria in the egg crate? Not enough soil? Smothered with LOVE? I think it was a combination of the intensity of my grow light (lettuce doesn’t like direct sun) and the tiny egg carton size. I restarted them in larger starter pots, about the size of 1/2 cup, and placed them in a softly lit window. I am happy to say they are now thriving.

New plants

Victories: My raised garden beds!  It was easy to decide what to fill them with: compost. Ask any gardener, and they sing the praises of compost. It’s available for a wide range of prices, starting at $45/cubic yard on Craigslist, all the way up to $203/cubic yard from the Vermont Compost Company. By going the thrifty route, I was happy to support a local farm while saving some cash.

Planters

Insider tip: the Gardener’s Supply Company has a handy online tool to calculate how much grow medium you will need, click here to check it out!

farm

A fourth generation dairy farmer named Alex was kind enough to deliver it. This kept my husband happy by saving his shiny red truck the torture of carting around composted cow pies. Thibault Farms in Colchester has been a part of Alex’s family for 100 years. This is his first year offering compost, and he is eager to expand with other topsoil options in the future. With no website for me to direct you to, all I can say is keep an eye out for him on Craiglist next year!

cow

Posted: 5-13-2017

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Oyster top view

I recently spent five days wandering the streets of N'awlins with a good friend. It was the type of vacation where our biggest concern each day was where we would eat our next meal.  We made some excellent choices, but if I had only one day of dining in that city, I would spend it like this:

Wake up early to snag a coffee at French Truck Coffee.  This small scale coffee shop has a handful of locations in New Orleans and Memphis.  With a focus on small batches of freshly roasted, sustainably sourced beans, its no wonder this place is the best coffee shop in town.  For a taste of local flair, try the New Orleans Iced Coffee: iced coffee with chicory, prepared with cream and sugar.

French Truck

For breakfast, head to Willa Jean in the Central Business District, lovingly referred to by locals as the "CBD."  Willa Jean celebrates Southern cuisine using fresh, local ingredients. Our server, a woman who exuded southern charm, was dressed like her counterparts in a gingham button-down shirt and jeans.  Even though I was not nursing a hangover, the "Hangover Breakfast" sounded too delicious to pass up: tasty grits topped with braised lamb and a poached egg. I had them add some braised collard greens, and we were in business!  They also have a walk-up counter with grab-n-go sandwiches and other bakery items if you are in a time crunch.

Willa Jean

Head to the other side of town for lunch at the Joint.  We didn't know until after we got home that in 2008, the Joint was featured on the Food Network program "Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives."  They are also on multiple "Top 10 BBQ" lists, including Zagat's.  The service is quick and the food is delicious.  With a slightly "dive-y" atmosphere, this place has a full service bar and a nice little patio.  I indulged in the pulled pork with a side of coleslaw and potato salad.

the Joint

As an afternoon snack, not that anyone could possibly still be hungry, I would make my way to the Blind Pelican for happy hour oysters.  You can't go to New Orleans and not indulge in some oysters.  Even my non-oyster-loving travel companion enjoyed the charbroiled oysters here.  During their 3pm-8pm happy hour, they serve a dozen oysters on the half-shell for only $3, or 6 charbroiled oysters for $5.  With 50 beers on tap and a full service bar, everyone should leave here happy.

Oyster side view

Get dinner in the up-and-coming warehouse district at Cochon Butcher, the creative child-restaurant of Cochon, located next door.  Cochon opened its doors just months after Hurricane Katrina ravaged New Orleans in 2006.  Due to the quality of their creative spin on Cajun cooking, they have been talk of the town ever since.  They opened their deli-style Butcher in 2009.  We enjoyed the Saturday special of fried chicken with a side of braised mustard greens and potato salad.  Butcher modernizes the old-world meat market and does all their curing in-house.

Butcher

If not in a food coma, take your party to Bacchanal for an after dinner cocktail.  Although Bacchanal is a wine shop, they make the tastiest cocktails in the city.  New Orleans is the birth city of my two favorite cocktails: the Sazerac and the Vieux Carre.  Somewhat surprisingly, for a wine bar, this place does them best.  Every evening, weather permitting, they host live music on their beautiful back patio.

bacchanal

If given more time, I would revisit:

  • The family owned and operated Ruby Slipper Café, which was inspired "by a powerful sense of homecoming when returning to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina," much like Dorothy's ruby slippers.  They serve an excellent eggs benedict and house-made bloody mary.
  • Paladar 511 serves a seasonal menu with locally grown ingredients.  Nothing on their menu will disappoint.
  • EAT New Orleans, a local spot with a, no joke, BYOB policy.  Focused on seasonal and local ingredients, they served one of the best breakfasts I had on the trip.
  • You don't go to New Orleans and expect to find great Isreali food, but Shaya is a real treat! It was a great recommendation from an Uber driver. Just be sure to make a reservation.  This place is no secret!
You cannot visit a place like New Orleans without celebrating the local cuisine.  One of my main motivators for travel is the local food. However, something I noticed in New Orleans dining was the serious lack of vegetables.  I enjoyed my taste of southern cooking, but I am glad to be back HOME with delicious and nutritious creations of my own!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

palm close up Fiddleheads are one of the first symbols of Spring for Vermonters.  I recently enjoyed my first experience with them, and oh my, what a treat!  With a lightning fast harvest, these little gems can disappear before you know it.  Get them while you can!  Both beautiful and delicious, they are an excellent addition to any meal.  With a nutty and mellow flavor, fiddleheads are reminiscent of asparagus. However, their interior is more firm than asparagus, and they don't come with that other, rather awkward, side effect of asparagus we all know about… bowl o greens I bought my fiddleheads at Lantman's in Hinesburg for $7.99/lb.  The cost alone is enough to inspire you to do your own wild fern foraging.  If you decide to go on your own, take an experienced guide for your first couple of ventures, as there is a poisonous lookalike you don’t want to eat. Close up They are naturally covered with a brown, papery coating.  This brown material is the cocoon from which the ferns emerge like little butterflies.  It is easy rinsed off with water.  I filled a bowl with water and gently rubbed the fiddleheads between my hands to break them free.  I decided to go simple with butter, garlic, and lemon; a preparation that celebrates the flavor while also being very difficult to NOT enjoy. greens Ingredients: 3/4 lb Fiddleheads 1 1/2 Tbsp Butter 3-5 Cloves of Chopped Garlic 1 Lemon sliced into 1/4 inch discs Salt to taste Pepper to taste ingredients Preparation: Prepare your fiddleheads by rinsing off the brown casing.  They do not require any cutting or slicing.  Melt the butter in a saucepan over medium heat.  Once heated, add the garlic and sautée for two minutes, stirring regularly.  Add the ferns and cover for 5-7 minutes, stirring occasionally.  Add half the lemon wheels, salt, and pepper.  Stir occasionally for another 3-5 minutes or until they turn into a slightly dull shade of green.  Serve immediately and top with remaining lemon wheels as garnish.  ENJOY! fry pan I served mine with roasted sweet mama squash and pork tenderloin, washed down with a delicious and local Mountain Ale by The Shed brewery. dinner plate

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Apple on tray

Growing up in the Pacific Northwest with varietals like Gala, Braeburn, and Fuji, my taste buds have been thoroughly enjoying the new-ness of the McIntosh and Empire apples that are popular in Vermont. Apples are so versatile; I prepare them on salad, in soup, with cheese or peanut butter, sautéed with cabbage and onion, etc ect ect...you get the idea! But applesauce, despite its simplicity, is something I have never made from scratch! Until now…

Apples on window

I am partial to Champlain Orchards brown-bagged apples; I buy them for $1.49/lb at Lantman's Market in Hinesburg. I was in a total rush to get groceries the other day, so I did not go through my normal routine of carefully inspecting each tote of apples to find the perfect bag. When I ended up with a bag of mushy, beaten, bruised, and otherwise sad apples, I regretted my hastiness.  I turned my disappointment into opportunity and inspiration - APPLESAUCE. No food goes to waste in my home!

Ingredients

I cruised the internet and found many recipes and methods.   They varied slightly in water content, some even recommend using a pressure cooker, but they all boil down (pun intended!) to the same thing: peel, cut, boil, shmoosh. What I found surprising, and the apples should find insulting, is that EVERY RECIPE I FOUND called for sugar! As if apples weren't sweet enough? I was shocked! I chose firmly to NOT add sugar. I had McIntosh apples, and they're sweet enough on their own! The spread I peeled my 13 small(ish) apples, and put them in a pot with 1/2 c. water, a pinch of salt, allspice, and cinnamon. I puttered around the kitchen finishing my meal prep for the week, stirring occasionally, until Voila! The most delicious applesauce I have ever tasted. Really! I can admit when my kitchen creations fall short of praise, and this stuff was amazing. It took around 30-40 min for me to notice that when I stirred, I had no more chunks! No shmooshing necessary! My applesauce inspired my lunch for the week: pork loin with applesauce and mustard, served with a side of green beans.  YUMM!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Lawn Shit This is a blog about local Vermont Food, and how much more local can you get than your own backyard?  Embracing Vermont's archetypically local-frame-of-mind, I am starting a garden. Being as I have spent my young adult years bouncing from apartment to apartment, mostly in the urban center of Portland, OR, the closest I have come to maintaining my own garden is the summer I grew cherry tomatoes and cilantro plants on my fire escape "patio."  Although I no longer live downtown, I still live in an apartment.  Thankfully, my landlord, aka my father-in-law, will let me plant a garden! Wood Cutting I have decided to build raised beds, and for the following reasons: 1. It delineates a private area in an otherwise publicly shared yard space 2. It's pretty 3. It's good for the plants!  We get some chilly weather here, we had snow twice in April this year; raised beds allow the soil to heat up faster and stay warmer; we also live on a hill, so this will help manage the water drainage. Level beds I bought my seeds and a grow light at the Gardener's Supply Company a couple weeks ago.  It's my new favorite place.  It's like Cheers: the manager remembered me and helped me find the woman I worked with on my first visit.  We took off again like old friends.  Her name is Betsy, and she is WONDERFUL at her job.  She's got loads of experience and is bubbling to share it. Bonus: Gardener's Supply Company is employee-owned and has it's headquarters in Burlington! s I picked out seed packets of all my favorite vegetables, and Betsy helped me edit down to the plants that are more likely to be successful if starting from seed and growing in Vermont.  I went home with: kale, red lettuce, zucchini, delicata squash, carrot, and beet seeds.  Poetically, I planted my seeds on Earth Day!  My dining room has become my nursery; I plan to transplant into my outdoor beds Memorial Day weekend, as per my new friend, Betsy's, suggestion. [caption id="attachment_4208" align="aligncenter" width="520"]deck Nothing caps off the perfect day spent outside working like a cold Lawson's "Sip of Sunshine" on the patio.[/caption]

I am under the impression that if my garden is successful, I will gain special access to a secret and elite group of hardcore Vermonters who grow all sorts of things here, despite the short growing season and late frosts.  I want IN!  I'm sure it won't be my dream garden right out of the gates, but I am prepared for all sorts of learning experiences along the journey.  Stay tuned!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Kale transplant My short life as a food grower is already full of drama. I have mourned my setbacks and celebrated small victories. Setbacks: ALL my lettuce starts died. EVERY. SINGLE. ONE. fizzled out after two short days of spindly growth. Despite lettuce's inability to emotionally bond with me, I felt responsible for their little lives; I felt sad like I would if I had a fish and it died. I also felt discouraged, like maybe starting from seeds is not a skill I was born with. Sad lettuce In attempted resourcefulness, I started my seeds in egg crates. Theoretically, this is a great idea, as the egg carton naturally decomposes and can be transplanted with the baby plant. Why did they die? Bacteria in the egg crate? Not enough soil? Smothered with LOVE? I think it was a combination of the intensity of my grow light (lettuce doesn't like direct sun) and the tiny egg carton size. I restarted them in larger starter pots, about the size of 1/2 cup, and placed them in a softly lit window. I am happy to say they are now thriving. New plants Victories: My raised garden beds!  It was easy to decide what to fill them with: compost. Ask any gardener, and they sing the praises of compost. It's available for a wide range of prices, starting at $45/cubic yard on Craigslist, all the way up to $203/cubic yard from the Vermont Compost Company. By going the thrifty route, I was happy to support a local farm while saving some cash. Planters Insider tip: the Gardener's Supply Company has a handy online tool to calculate how much grow medium you will need, click here to check it out! farm A fourth generation dairy farmer named Alex was kind enough to deliver it. This kept my husband happy by saving his shiny red truck the torture of carting around composted cow pies. Thibault Farms in Colchester has been a part of Alex's family for 100 years. This is his first year offering compost, and he is eager to expand with other topsoil options in the future. 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You make them look AMAZING" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(137) "Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; CPU iPhone OS 10_3_1 like Mac OS X) AppleWebKit/603.1.30 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/10.0 Mobile/14E304 Safari/602.1" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" } [1]=> &object(stdClass)#40 (15) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208529" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "4239" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Bronwyn Dunne" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "bronwyndunne@mac.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(34) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(14) "70.109.154.188" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-27 02:19:51" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-27 02:19:51" ["comment_content"]=> string(208) "For a new Vermonter you're definitely taking to the local cuisine in and engaging way. I love the recipe and the photos are terrific! Can't wait to see what your next food adventure will be....Thanks, Corrie!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(116) "Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_9_5) AppleWebKit/601.7.8 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/9.1.3 Safari/537.86.7" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" } } ["comments_by_type"]=> array(4) { ["comment"]=> array(2) { [0]=> &object(stdClass)#71 (15) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208528" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "4239" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Kellie Kutkey" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "kutkey@integrity.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.20.169.240" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-22 15:16:51" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-22 15:16:51" ["comment_content"]=> string(66) "I want to harvest them next spring. . . 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When Life Gives You Bruised Apples…Make Applesauce!!!

In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Apple on tray

Growing up in the Pacific Northwest with varietals like Gala, Braeburn, and Fuji, my taste buds have been thoroughly enjoying the new-ness of the McIntosh and Empire apples that are popular in Vermont. Apples are so versatile; I prepare them on salad, in soup, with cheese or peanut butter, sautéed with cabbage and onion, etc ect ect…you get the idea! But applesauce, despite its simplicity, is something I have never made from scratch! Until now…

Apples on window

I am partial to Champlain Orchards brown-bagged apples; I buy them for $1.49/lb at Lantman’s Market in Hinesburg. I was in a total rush to get groceries the other day, so I did not go through my normal routine of carefully inspecting each tote of apples to find the perfect bag. When I ended up with a bag of mushy, beaten, bruised, and otherwise sad apples, I regretted my hastiness.  I turned my disappointment into opportunity and inspiration – APPLESAUCE. No food goes to waste in my home!

Ingredients

I cruised the internet and found many recipes and methods.   They varied slightly in water content, some even recommend using a pressure cooker, but they all boil down (pun intended!) to the same thing: peel, cut, boil, shmoosh. What I found surprising, and the apples should find insulting, is that EVERY RECIPE I FOUND called for sugar! As if apples weren’t sweet enough? I was shocked! I chose firmly to NOT add sugar. I had McIntosh apples, and they’re sweet enough on their own!

The spread

I peeled my 13 small(ish) apples, and put them in a pot with 1/2 c. water, a pinch of salt, allspice, and cinnamon. I puttered around the kitchen finishing my meal prep for the week, stirring occasionally, until Voila! The most delicious applesauce I have ever tasted. Really! I can admit when my kitchen creations fall short of praise, and this stuff was amazing. It took around 30-40 min for me to notice that when I stirred, I had no more chunks! No shmooshing necessary!

My applesauce inspired my lunch for the week: pork loin with applesauce and mustard, served with a side of green beans.  YUMM!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

Posted: 5-6-2017

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Oyster top view

I recently spent five days wandering the streets of N'awlins with a good friend. It was the type of vacation where our biggest concern each day was where we would eat our next meal.  We made some excellent choices, but if I had only one day of dining in that city, I would spend it like this:

Wake up early to snag a coffee at French Truck Coffee.  This small scale coffee shop has a handful of locations in New Orleans and Memphis.  With a focus on small batches of freshly roasted, sustainably sourced beans, its no wonder this place is the best coffee shop in town.  For a taste of local flair, try the New Orleans Iced Coffee: iced coffee with chicory, prepared with cream and sugar.

French Truck

For breakfast, head to Willa Jean in the Central Business District, lovingly referred to by locals as the "CBD."  Willa Jean celebrates Southern cuisine using fresh, local ingredients. Our server, a woman who exuded southern charm, was dressed like her counterparts in a gingham button-down shirt and jeans.  Even though I was not nursing a hangover, the "Hangover Breakfast" sounded too delicious to pass up: tasty grits topped with braised lamb and a poached egg. I had them add some braised collard greens, and we were in business!  They also have a walk-up counter with grab-n-go sandwiches and other bakery items if you are in a time crunch.

Willa Jean

Head to the other side of town for lunch at the Joint.  We didn't know until after we got home that in 2008, the Joint was featured on the Food Network program "Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives."  They are also on multiple "Top 10 BBQ" lists, including Zagat's.  The service is quick and the food is delicious.  With a slightly "dive-y" atmosphere, this place has a full service bar and a nice little patio.  I indulged in the pulled pork with a side of coleslaw and potato salad.

the Joint

As an afternoon snack, not that anyone could possibly still be hungry, I would make my way to the Blind Pelican for happy hour oysters.  You can't go to New Orleans and not indulge in some oysters.  Even my non-oyster-loving travel companion enjoyed the charbroiled oysters here.  During their 3pm-8pm happy hour, they serve a dozen oysters on the half-shell for only $3, or 6 charbroiled oysters for $5.  With 50 beers on tap and a full service bar, everyone should leave here happy.

Oyster side view

Get dinner in the up-and-coming warehouse district at Cochon Butcher, the creative child-restaurant of Cochon, located next door.  Cochon opened its doors just months after Hurricane Katrina ravaged New Orleans in 2006.  Due to the quality of their creative spin on Cajun cooking, they have been talk of the town ever since.  They opened their deli-style Butcher in 2009.  We enjoyed the Saturday special of fried chicken with a side of braised mustard greens and potato salad.  Butcher modernizes the old-world meat market and does all their curing in-house.

Butcher

If not in a food coma, take your party to Bacchanal for an after dinner cocktail.  Although Bacchanal is a wine shop, they make the tastiest cocktails in the city.  New Orleans is the birth city of my two favorite cocktails: the Sazerac and the Vieux Carre.  Somewhat surprisingly, for a wine bar, this place does them best.  Every evening, weather permitting, they host live music on their beautiful back patio.

bacchanal

If given more time, I would revisit:

  • The family owned and operated Ruby Slipper Café, which was inspired "by a powerful sense of homecoming when returning to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina," much like Dorothy's ruby slippers.  They serve an excellent eggs benedict and house-made bloody mary.
  • Paladar 511 serves a seasonal menu with locally grown ingredients.  Nothing on their menu will disappoint.
  • EAT New Orleans, a local spot with a, no joke, BYOB policy.  Focused on seasonal and local ingredients, they served one of the best breakfasts I had on the trip.
  • You don't go to New Orleans and expect to find great Isreali food, but Shaya is a real treat! It was a great recommendation from an Uber driver. Just be sure to make a reservation.  This place is no secret!
You cannot visit a place like New Orleans without celebrating the local cuisine.  One of my main motivators for travel is the local food. However, something I noticed in New Orleans dining was the serious lack of vegetables.  I enjoyed my taste of southern cooking, but I am glad to be back HOME with delicious and nutritious creations of my own!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

palm close up Fiddleheads are one of the first symbols of Spring for Vermonters.  I recently enjoyed my first experience with them, and oh my, what a treat!  With a lightning fast harvest, these little gems can disappear before you know it.  Get them while you can!  Both beautiful and delicious, they are an excellent addition to any meal.  With a nutty and mellow flavor, fiddleheads are reminiscent of asparagus. However, their interior is more firm than asparagus, and they don't come with that other, rather awkward, side effect of asparagus we all know about… bowl o greens I bought my fiddleheads at Lantman's in Hinesburg for $7.99/lb.  The cost alone is enough to inspire you to do your own wild fern foraging.  If you decide to go on your own, take an experienced guide for your first couple of ventures, as there is a poisonous lookalike you don’t want to eat. Close up They are naturally covered with a brown, papery coating.  This brown material is the cocoon from which the ferns emerge like little butterflies.  It is easy rinsed off with water.  I filled a bowl with water and gently rubbed the fiddleheads between my hands to break them free.  I decided to go simple with butter, garlic, and lemon; a preparation that celebrates the flavor while also being very difficult to NOT enjoy. greens Ingredients: 3/4 lb Fiddleheads 1 1/2 Tbsp Butter 3-5 Cloves of Chopped Garlic 1 Lemon sliced into 1/4 inch discs Salt to taste Pepper to taste ingredients Preparation: Prepare your fiddleheads by rinsing off the brown casing.  They do not require any cutting or slicing.  Melt the butter in a saucepan over medium heat.  Once heated, add the garlic and sautée for two minutes, stirring regularly.  Add the ferns and cover for 5-7 minutes, stirring occasionally.  Add half the lemon wheels, salt, and pepper.  Stir occasionally for another 3-5 minutes or until they turn into a slightly dull shade of green.  Serve immediately and top with remaining lemon wheels as garnish.  ENJOY! fry pan I served mine with roasted sweet mama squash and pork tenderloin, washed down with a delicious and local Mountain Ale by The Shed brewery. dinner plate

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Kale transplant My short life as a food grower is already full of drama. I have mourned my setbacks and celebrated small victories. Setbacks: ALL my lettuce starts died. EVERY. SINGLE. ONE. fizzled out after two short days of spindly growth. Despite lettuce's inability to emotionally bond with me, I felt responsible for their little lives; I felt sad like I would if I had a fish and it died. I also felt discouraged, like maybe starting from seeds is not a skill I was born with. Sad lettuce In attempted resourcefulness, I started my seeds in egg crates. Theoretically, this is a great idea, as the egg carton naturally decomposes and can be transplanted with the baby plant. Why did they die? Bacteria in the egg crate? Not enough soil? Smothered with LOVE? I think it was a combination of the intensity of my grow light (lettuce doesn't like direct sun) and the tiny egg carton size. I restarted them in larger starter pots, about the size of 1/2 cup, and placed them in a softly lit window. I am happy to say they are now thriving. New plants Victories: My raised garden beds!  It was easy to decide what to fill them with: compost. Ask any gardener, and they sing the praises of compost. It's available for a wide range of prices, starting at $45/cubic yard on Craigslist, all the way up to $203/cubic yard from the Vermont Compost Company. By going the thrifty route, I was happy to support a local farm while saving some cash. Planters Insider tip: the Gardener's Supply Company has a handy online tool to calculate how much grow medium you will need, click here to check it out! farm A fourth generation dairy farmer named Alex was kind enough to deliver it. This kept my husband happy by saving his shiny red truck the torture of carting around composted cow pies. Thibault Farms in Colchester has been a part of Alex's family for 100 years. This is his first year offering compost, and he is eager to expand with other topsoil options in the future. With no website for me to direct you to, all I can say is keep an eye out for him on Craiglist next year! cow" ["post_title"]=> string(31) "This is Not a Gardening Blog II" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(31) "this-is-not-a-gardening-blog-ii" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(101) " http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/blog/new-guest-writer-welcome-corrie-to-the-green-mountain-state/" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-05-28 16:44:22" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-28 16:44:22" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=4226" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#234 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(4198) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-06 08:00:53" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-06 08:00:53" ["post_content"]=> string(4171) "

In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Apple on tray

Growing up in the Pacific Northwest with varietals like Gala, Braeburn, and Fuji, my taste buds have been thoroughly enjoying the new-ness of the McIntosh and Empire apples that are popular in Vermont. Apples are so versatile; I prepare them on salad, in soup, with cheese or peanut butter, sautéed with cabbage and onion, etc ect ect...you get the idea! But applesauce, despite its simplicity, is something I have never made from scratch! Until now…

Apples on window

I am partial to Champlain Orchards brown-bagged apples; I buy them for $1.49/lb at Lantman's Market in Hinesburg. I was in a total rush to get groceries the other day, so I did not go through my normal routine of carefully inspecting each tote of apples to find the perfect bag. When I ended up with a bag of mushy, beaten, bruised, and otherwise sad apples, I regretted my hastiness.  I turned my disappointment into opportunity and inspiration - APPLESAUCE. No food goes to waste in my home!

Ingredients

I cruised the internet and found many recipes and methods.   They varied slightly in water content, some even recommend using a pressure cooker, but they all boil down (pun intended!) to the same thing: peel, cut, boil, shmoosh. What I found surprising, and the apples should find insulting, is that EVERY RECIPE I FOUND called for sugar! As if apples weren't sweet enough? I was shocked! I chose firmly to NOT add sugar. I had McIntosh apples, and they're sweet enough on their own! The spread I peeled my 13 small(ish) apples, and put them in a pot with 1/2 c. water, a pinch of salt, allspice, and cinnamon. I puttered around the kitchen finishing my meal prep for the week, stirring occasionally, until Voila! The most delicious applesauce I have ever tasted. Really! I can admit when my kitchen creations fall short of praise, and this stuff was amazing. It took around 30-40 min for me to notice that when I stirred, I had no more chunks! No shmooshing necessary! My applesauce inspired my lunch for the week: pork loin with applesauce and mustard, served with a side of green beans.  YUMM!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Lawn Shit This is a blog about local Vermont Food, and how much more local can you get than your own backyard?  Embracing Vermont's archetypically local-frame-of-mind, I am starting a garden. Being as I have spent my young adult years bouncing from apartment to apartment, mostly in the urban center of Portland, OR, the closest I have come to maintaining my own garden is the summer I grew cherry tomatoes and cilantro plants on my fire escape "patio."  Although I no longer live downtown, I still live in an apartment.  Thankfully, my landlord, aka my father-in-law, will let me plant a garden! Wood Cutting I have decided to build raised beds, and for the following reasons: 1. It delineates a private area in an otherwise publicly shared yard space 2. It's pretty 3. It's good for the plants!  We get some chilly weather here, we had snow twice in April this year; raised beds allow the soil to heat up faster and stay warmer; we also live on a hill, so this will help manage the water drainage. Level beds I bought my seeds and a grow light at the Gardener's Supply Company a couple weeks ago.  It's my new favorite place.  It's like Cheers: the manager remembered me and helped me find the woman I worked with on my first visit.  We took off again like old friends.  Her name is Betsy, and she is WONDERFUL at her job.  She's got loads of experience and is bubbling to share it. Bonus: Gardener's Supply Company is employee-owned and has it's headquarters in Burlington! s I picked out seed packets of all my favorite vegetables, and Betsy helped me edit down to the plants that are more likely to be successful if starting from seed and growing in Vermont.  I went home with: kale, red lettuce, zucchini, delicata squash, carrot, and beet seeds.  Poetically, I planted my seeds on Earth Day!  My dining room has become my nursery; I plan to transplant into my outdoor beds Memorial Day weekend, as per my new friend, Betsy's, suggestion. [caption id="attachment_4208" align="aligncenter" width="520"]deck Nothing caps off the perfect day spent outside working like a cold Lawson's "Sip of Sunshine" on the patio.[/caption]

I am under the impression that if my garden is successful, I will gain special access to a secret and elite group of hardcore Vermonters who grow all sorts of things here, despite the short growing season and late frosts.  I want IN!  I'm sure it won't be my dream garden right out of the gates, but I am prepared for all sorts of learning experiences along the journey.  Stay tuned!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Apple on tray

Growing up in the Pacific Northwest with varietals like Gala, Braeburn, and Fuji, my taste buds have been thoroughly enjoying the new-ness of the McIntosh and Empire apples that are popular in Vermont. Apples are so versatile; I prepare them on salad, in soup, with cheese or peanut butter, sautéed with cabbage and onion, etc ect ect...you get the idea! But applesauce, despite its simplicity, is something I have never made from scratch! Until now…

Apples on window

I am partial to Champlain Orchards brown-bagged apples; I buy them for $1.49/lb at Lantman's Market in Hinesburg. I was in a total rush to get groceries the other day, so I did not go through my normal routine of carefully inspecting each tote of apples to find the perfect bag. When I ended up with a bag of mushy, beaten, bruised, and otherwise sad apples, I regretted my hastiness.  I turned my disappointment into opportunity and inspiration - APPLESAUCE. No food goes to waste in my home!

Ingredients

I cruised the internet and found many recipes and methods.   They varied slightly in water content, some even recommend using a pressure cooker, but they all boil down (pun intended!) to the same thing: peel, cut, boil, shmoosh. What I found surprising, and the apples should find insulting, is that EVERY RECIPE I FOUND called for sugar! As if apples weren't sweet enough? I was shocked! I chose firmly to NOT add sugar. I had McIntosh apples, and they're sweet enough on their own! The spread I peeled my 13 small(ish) apples, and put them in a pot with 1/2 c. water, a pinch of salt, allspice, and cinnamon. I puttered around the kitchen finishing my meal prep for the week, stirring occasionally, until Voila! The most delicious applesauce I have ever tasted. Really! I can admit when my kitchen creations fall short of praise, and this stuff was amazing. It took around 30-40 min for me to notice that when I stirred, I had no more chunks! No shmooshing necessary! My applesauce inspired my lunch for the week: pork loin with applesauce and mustard, served with a side of green beans.  YUMM!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

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4 Responses to “When Life Gives You Bruised Apples…Make Applesauce!!!”

  1. Niki Glanz says:

    Hi Bronwyn,
    I’ve made the same transition: Northwest Apples to Northeast, plus I also favor Champlain Orchard apples. Knew some Middlebury College students who worked there parttime and raved about their behind-the-scenes practices. We all know how much that counts. Now I live in Lebanon, NH, but fortunately C.O. also markets to this area.

    Let me know if you visit this area. Would enjoy rekindling our friendship that began with a book club at Shelburne Farms’ Brick House. (You may not remember me: tall lady working on a massive research/book writing projects, which I’m happy to say has come to fruition at long last.) You’re welcome to visit my humble abode or we could meet in Hanover, which features many amazing restaurants. Best regards,
    Niki: 802-238-5306

    • Bronwyn says:

      Hi Christine!
      My name is Corrie, and I just started managing Bronwyn’s blog! Did you find any new favorite apple types when you moved to the Northeast? I have a new favorite now: McIntosh. YUM!

  2. Kellie M Kutkey says:

    Hi Corrie!
    This reminds me of Grandma Pearl saying, “Eat the wormy ones first!”-haha-because you overcame your disappointment and made the best of bruised and mushy apples.
    I also love that you said NO FOOD GOES TO WASTE IN MY HOUSE.
    I’m anxious to hear how your pressure cooker helps you in the kitchen.
    Talk to you soon!
    Happy eating

    • Bronwyn says:

      Hi mom!
      I think it’s easier to make the best of bruised apples than wormy ones…maybe not?
      Pearl sure did have a hardy approach to living!
      Love you,
      Corrie

Leave a Reply


 

This is Not a Gardening Blog

In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Lawn Shit

This is a blog about local Vermont Food, and how much more local can you get than your own backyard?  Embracing Vermont’s archetypically local-frame-of-mind, I am starting a garden.

Being as I have spent my young adult years bouncing from apartment to apartment, mostly in the urban center of Portland, OR, the closest I have come to maintaining my own garden is the summer I grew cherry tomatoes and cilantro plants on my fire escape “patio.”  Although I no longer live downtown, I still live in an apartment.  Thankfully, my landlord, aka my father-in-law, will let me plant a garden!

Wood Cutting

I have decided to build raised beds, and for the following reasons:

1. It delineates a private area in an otherwise publicly shared yard space

2. It’s pretty

3. It’s good for the plants!  We get some chilly weather here, we had snow twice in April this year; raised beds allow the soil to heat up faster and stay warmer; we also live on a hill, so this will help manage the water drainage.

Level beds

I bought my seeds and a grow light at the Gardener’s Supply Company a couple weeks ago.  It’s my new favorite place.  It’s like Cheers: the manager remembered me and helped me find the woman I worked with on my first visit.  We took off again like old friends.  Her name is Betsy, and she is WONDERFUL at her job.  She’s got loads of experience and is bubbling to share it. Bonus: Gardener’s Supply Company is employee-owned and has it’s headquarters in Burlington!

s

I picked out seed packets of all my favorite vegetables, and Betsy helped me edit down to the plants that are more likely to be successful if starting from seed and growing in Vermont.  I went home with: kale, red lettuce, zucchini, delicata squash, carrot, and beet seeds.  Poetically, I planted my seeds on Earth Day!  My dining room has become my nursery; I plan to transplant into my outdoor beds Memorial Day weekend, as per my new friend, Betsy’s, suggestion.

deck

Nothing caps off the perfect day spent outside working like a cold Lawson’s “Sip of Sunshine” on the patio.

I am under the impression that if my garden is successful, I will gain special access to a secret and elite group of hardcore Vermonters who grow all sorts of things here, despite the short growing season and late frosts.  I want IN!  I’m sure it won’t be my dream garden right out of the gates, but I am prepared for all sorts of learning experiences along the journey.  Stay tuned!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

Posted: 4-29-2017

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Oyster top view

I recently spent five days wandering the streets of N'awlins with a good friend. It was the type of vacation where our biggest concern each day was where we would eat our next meal.  We made some excellent choices, but if I had only one day of dining in that city, I would spend it like this:

Wake up early to snag a coffee at French Truck Coffee.  This small scale coffee shop has a handful of locations in New Orleans and Memphis.  With a focus on small batches of freshly roasted, sustainably sourced beans, its no wonder this place is the best coffee shop in town.  For a taste of local flair, try the New Orleans Iced Coffee: iced coffee with chicory, prepared with cream and sugar.

French Truck

For breakfast, head to Willa Jean in the Central Business District, lovingly referred to by locals as the "CBD."  Willa Jean celebrates Southern cuisine using fresh, local ingredients. Our server, a woman who exuded southern charm, was dressed like her counterparts in a gingham button-down shirt and jeans.  Even though I was not nursing a hangover, the "Hangover Breakfast" sounded too delicious to pass up: tasty grits topped with braised lamb and a poached egg. I had them add some braised collard greens, and we were in business!  They also have a walk-up counter with grab-n-go sandwiches and other bakery items if you are in a time crunch.

Willa Jean

Head to the other side of town for lunch at the Joint.  We didn't know until after we got home that in 2008, the Joint was featured on the Food Network program "Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives."  They are also on multiple "Top 10 BBQ" lists, including Zagat's.  The service is quick and the food is delicious.  With a slightly "dive-y" atmosphere, this place has a full service bar and a nice little patio.  I indulged in the pulled pork with a side of coleslaw and potato salad.

the Joint

As an afternoon snack, not that anyone could possibly still be hungry, I would make my way to the Blind Pelican for happy hour oysters.  You can't go to New Orleans and not indulge in some oysters.  Even my non-oyster-loving travel companion enjoyed the charbroiled oysters here.  During their 3pm-8pm happy hour, they serve a dozen oysters on the half-shell for only $3, or 6 charbroiled oysters for $5.  With 50 beers on tap and a full service bar, everyone should leave here happy.

Oyster side view

Get dinner in the up-and-coming warehouse district at Cochon Butcher, the creative child-restaurant of Cochon, located next door.  Cochon opened its doors just months after Hurricane Katrina ravaged New Orleans in 2006.  Due to the quality of their creative spin on Cajun cooking, they have been talk of the town ever since.  They opened their deli-style Butcher in 2009.  We enjoyed the Saturday special of fried chicken with a side of braised mustard greens and potato salad.  Butcher modernizes the old-world meat market and does all their curing in-house.

Butcher

If not in a food coma, take your party to Bacchanal for an after dinner cocktail.  Although Bacchanal is a wine shop, they make the tastiest cocktails in the city.  New Orleans is the birth city of my two favorite cocktails: the Sazerac and the Vieux Carre.  Somewhat surprisingly, for a wine bar, this place does them best.  Every evening, weather permitting, they host live music on their beautiful back patio.

bacchanal

If given more time, I would revisit:

  • The family owned and operated Ruby Slipper Café, which was inspired "by a powerful sense of homecoming when returning to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina," much like Dorothy's ruby slippers.  They serve an excellent eggs benedict and house-made bloody mary.
  • Paladar 511 serves a seasonal menu with locally grown ingredients.  Nothing on their menu will disappoint.
  • EAT New Orleans, a local spot with a, no joke, BYOB policy.  Focused on seasonal and local ingredients, they served one of the best breakfasts I had on the trip.
  • You don't go to New Orleans and expect to find great Isreali food, but Shaya is a real treat! It was a great recommendation from an Uber driver. Just be sure to make a reservation.  This place is no secret!
You cannot visit a place like New Orleans without celebrating the local cuisine.  One of my main motivators for travel is the local food. However, something I noticed in New Orleans dining was the serious lack of vegetables.  I enjoyed my taste of southern cooking, but I am glad to be back HOME with delicious and nutritious creations of my own!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

palm close up Fiddleheads are one of the first symbols of Spring for Vermonters.  I recently enjoyed my first experience with them, and oh my, what a treat!  With a lightning fast harvest, these little gems can disappear before you know it.  Get them while you can!  Both beautiful and delicious, they are an excellent addition to any meal.  With a nutty and mellow flavor, fiddleheads are reminiscent of asparagus. However, their interior is more firm than asparagus, and they don't come with that other, rather awkward, side effect of asparagus we all know about… bowl o greens I bought my fiddleheads at Lantman's in Hinesburg for $7.99/lb.  The cost alone is enough to inspire you to do your own wild fern foraging.  If you decide to go on your own, take an experienced guide for your first couple of ventures, as there is a poisonous lookalike you don’t want to eat. Close up They are naturally covered with a brown, papery coating.  This brown material is the cocoon from which the ferns emerge like little butterflies.  It is easy rinsed off with water.  I filled a bowl with water and gently rubbed the fiddleheads between my hands to break them free.  I decided to go simple with butter, garlic, and lemon; a preparation that celebrates the flavor while also being very difficult to NOT enjoy. greens Ingredients: 3/4 lb Fiddleheads 1 1/2 Tbsp Butter 3-5 Cloves of Chopped Garlic 1 Lemon sliced into 1/4 inch discs Salt to taste Pepper to taste ingredients Preparation: Prepare your fiddleheads by rinsing off the brown casing.  They do not require any cutting or slicing.  Melt the butter in a saucepan over medium heat.  Once heated, add the garlic and sautée for two minutes, stirring regularly.  Add the ferns and cover for 5-7 minutes, stirring occasionally.  Add half the lemon wheels, salt, and pepper.  Stir occasionally for another 3-5 minutes or until they turn into a slightly dull shade of green.  Serve immediately and top with remaining lemon wheels as garnish.  ENJOY! fry pan I served mine with roasted sweet mama squash and pork tenderloin, washed down with a delicious and local Mountain Ale by The Shed brewery. dinner plate

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Kale transplant My short life as a food grower is already full of drama. I have mourned my setbacks and celebrated small victories. Setbacks: ALL my lettuce starts died. EVERY. SINGLE. ONE. fizzled out after two short days of spindly growth. Despite lettuce's inability to emotionally bond with me, I felt responsible for their little lives; I felt sad like I would if I had a fish and it died. I also felt discouraged, like maybe starting from seeds is not a skill I was born with. Sad lettuce In attempted resourcefulness, I started my seeds in egg crates. Theoretically, this is a great idea, as the egg carton naturally decomposes and can be transplanted with the baby plant. Why did they die? Bacteria in the egg crate? Not enough soil? Smothered with LOVE? I think it was a combination of the intensity of my grow light (lettuce doesn't like direct sun) and the tiny egg carton size. I restarted them in larger starter pots, about the size of 1/2 cup, and placed them in a softly lit window. I am happy to say they are now thriving. New plants Victories: My raised garden beds!  It was easy to decide what to fill them with: compost. Ask any gardener, and they sing the praises of compost. It's available for a wide range of prices, starting at $45/cubic yard on Craigslist, all the way up to $203/cubic yard from the Vermont Compost Company. By going the thrifty route, I was happy to support a local farm while saving some cash. Planters Insider tip: the Gardener's Supply Company has a handy online tool to calculate how much grow medium you will need, click here to check it out! farm A fourth generation dairy farmer named Alex was kind enough to deliver it. This kept my husband happy by saving his shiny red truck the torture of carting around composted cow pies. Thibault Farms in Colchester has been a part of Alex's family for 100 years. This is his first year offering compost, and he is eager to expand with other topsoil options in the future. With no website for me to direct you to, all I can say is keep an eye out for him on Craiglist next year! cow" ["post_title"]=> string(31) "This is Not a Gardening Blog II" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(31) "this-is-not-a-gardening-blog-ii" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(101) " http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/blog/new-guest-writer-welcome-corrie-to-the-green-mountain-state/" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-05-28 16:44:22" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-28 16:44:22" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=4226" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#234 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(4198) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-06 08:00:53" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-06 08:00:53" ["post_content"]=> string(4171) "

In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Apple on tray

Growing up in the Pacific Northwest with varietals like Gala, Braeburn, and Fuji, my taste buds have been thoroughly enjoying the new-ness of the McIntosh and Empire apples that are popular in Vermont. Apples are so versatile; I prepare them on salad, in soup, with cheese or peanut butter, sautéed with cabbage and onion, etc ect ect...you get the idea! But applesauce, despite its simplicity, is something I have never made from scratch! Until now…

Apples on window

I am partial to Champlain Orchards brown-bagged apples; I buy them for $1.49/lb at Lantman's Market in Hinesburg. I was in a total rush to get groceries the other day, so I did not go through my normal routine of carefully inspecting each tote of apples to find the perfect bag. When I ended up with a bag of mushy, beaten, bruised, and otherwise sad apples, I regretted my hastiness.  I turned my disappointment into opportunity and inspiration - APPLESAUCE. No food goes to waste in my home!

Ingredients

I cruised the internet and found many recipes and methods.   They varied slightly in water content, some even recommend using a pressure cooker, but they all boil down (pun intended!) to the same thing: peel, cut, boil, shmoosh. What I found surprising, and the apples should find insulting, is that EVERY RECIPE I FOUND called for sugar! As if apples weren't sweet enough? I was shocked! I chose firmly to NOT add sugar. I had McIntosh apples, and they're sweet enough on their own! The spread I peeled my 13 small(ish) apples, and put them in a pot with 1/2 c. water, a pinch of salt, allspice, and cinnamon. I puttered around the kitchen finishing my meal prep for the week, stirring occasionally, until Voila! The most delicious applesauce I have ever tasted. Really! I can admit when my kitchen creations fall short of praise, and this stuff was amazing. It took around 30-40 min for me to notice that when I stirred, I had no more chunks! No shmooshing necessary! My applesauce inspired my lunch for the week: pork loin with applesauce and mustard, served with a side of green beans.  YUMM!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Lawn Shit This is a blog about local Vermont Food, and how much more local can you get than your own backyard?  Embracing Vermont's archetypically local-frame-of-mind, I am starting a garden. Being as I have spent my young adult years bouncing from apartment to apartment, mostly in the urban center of Portland, OR, the closest I have come to maintaining my own garden is the summer I grew cherry tomatoes and cilantro plants on my fire escape "patio."  Although I no longer live downtown, I still live in an apartment.  Thankfully, my landlord, aka my father-in-law, will let me plant a garden! Wood Cutting I have decided to build raised beds, and for the following reasons: 1. It delineates a private area in an otherwise publicly shared yard space 2. It's pretty 3. It's good for the plants!  We get some chilly weather here, we had snow twice in April this year; raised beds allow the soil to heat up faster and stay warmer; we also live on a hill, so this will help manage the water drainage. Level beds I bought my seeds and a grow light at the Gardener's Supply Company a couple weeks ago.  It's my new favorite place.  It's like Cheers: the manager remembered me and helped me find the woman I worked with on my first visit.  We took off again like old friends.  Her name is Betsy, and she is WONDERFUL at her job.  She's got loads of experience and is bubbling to share it. Bonus: Gardener's Supply Company is employee-owned and has it's headquarters in Burlington! s I picked out seed packets of all my favorite vegetables, and Betsy helped me edit down to the plants that are more likely to be successful if starting from seed and growing in Vermont.  I went home with: kale, red lettuce, zucchini, delicata squash, carrot, and beet seeds.  Poetically, I planted my seeds on Earth Day!  My dining room has become my nursery; I plan to transplant into my outdoor beds Memorial Day weekend, as per my new friend, Betsy's, suggestion. [caption id="attachment_4208" align="aligncenter" width="520"]deck Nothing caps off the perfect day spent outside working like a cold Lawson's "Sip of Sunshine" on the patio.[/caption]

I am under the impression that if my garden is successful, I will gain special access to a secret and elite group of hardcore Vermonters who grow all sorts of things here, despite the short growing season and late frosts.  I want IN!  I'm sure it won't be my dream garden right out of the gates, but I am prepared for all sorts of learning experiences along the journey.  Stay tuned!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

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In the Kitchen with Bronwyn welcomes Corrie Austin, new to both Vermont and to the excitement and challenge of the Vermont food world. She’s jumped in with both feet, a transplant from another great food region, Portland, Oregon. And, it is no surprise to this writer that she trained as an architect before falling in love and following her Vermont-born husband to our green mountains.

Lawn Shit This is a blog about local Vermont Food, and how much more local can you get than your own backyard?  Embracing Vermont's archetypically local-frame-of-mind, I am starting a garden. Being as I have spent my young adult years bouncing from apartment to apartment, mostly in the urban center of Portland, OR, the closest I have come to maintaining my own garden is the summer I grew cherry tomatoes and cilantro plants on my fire escape "patio."  Although I no longer live downtown, I still live in an apartment.  Thankfully, my landlord, aka my father-in-law, will let me plant a garden! Wood Cutting I have decided to build raised beds, and for the following reasons: 1. It delineates a private area in an otherwise publicly shared yard space 2. It's pretty 3. It's good for the plants!  We get some chilly weather here, we had snow twice in April this year; raised beds allow the soil to heat up faster and stay warmer; we also live on a hill, so this will help manage the water drainage. Level beds I bought my seeds and a grow light at the Gardener's Supply Company a couple weeks ago.  It's my new favorite place.  It's like Cheers: the manager remembered me and helped me find the woman I worked with on my first visit.  We took off again like old friends.  Her name is Betsy, and she is WONDERFUL at her job.  She's got loads of experience and is bubbling to share it. Bonus: Gardener's Supply Company is employee-owned and has it's headquarters in Burlington! s I picked out seed packets of all my favorite vegetables, and Betsy helped me edit down to the plants that are more likely to be successful if starting from seed and growing in Vermont.  I went home with: kale, red lettuce, zucchini, delicata squash, carrot, and beet seeds.  Poetically, I planted my seeds on Earth Day!  My dining room has become my nursery; I plan to transplant into my outdoor beds Memorial Day weekend, as per my new friend, Betsy's, suggestion. [caption id="attachment_4208" align="aligncenter" width="520"]deck Nothing caps off the perfect day spent outside working like a cold Lawson's "Sip of Sunshine" on the patio.[/caption]

I am under the impression that if my garden is successful, I will gain special access to a secret and elite group of hardcore Vermonters who grow all sorts of things here, despite the short growing season and late frosts.  I want IN!  I'm sure it won't be my dream garden right out of the gates, but I am prepared for all sorts of learning experiences along the journey.  Stay tuned!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

" ["post_title"]=> string(28) "This is Not a Gardening Blog" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(28) "this-is-not-a-gardening-blog" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-05-28 16:46:50" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-28 16:46:50" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=4196" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "2" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["queried_object"]=> object(stdClass)#241 (16) { ["term_id"]=> &int(1) ["name"]=> &string(4) "blog" ["slug"]=> &string(4) "blog" ["term_group"]=> int(0) ["term_taxonomy_id"]=> int(1) ["taxonomy"]=> string(8) "category" ["description"]=> &string(0) "" ["parent"]=> &int(0) ["count"]=> &int(116) ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["cat_ID"]=> &int(1) ["category_count"]=> &int(116) ["category_description"]=> &string(0) "" ["cat_name"]=> &string(4) "blog" ["category_nicename"]=> &string(4) "blog" ["category_parent"]=> &int(0) } ["queried_object_id"]=> int(1) ["comments"]=> array(4) { [0]=> &object(stdClass)#96 (15) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208523" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "4198" ["comment_author"]=> string(10) "Niki Glanz" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(17) "nikiglanz@aol.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(33) "http://www.memoriestomomentum.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "73.114.21.191" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-08 15:51:32" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-08 15:51:32" ["comment_content"]=> string(772) "Hi Bronwyn, I've made the same transition: Northwest Apples to Northeast, plus I also favor Champlain Orchard apples. Knew some Middlebury College students who worked there parttime and raved about their behind-the-scenes practices. We all know how much that counts. Now I live in Lebanon, NH, but fortunately C.O. also markets to this area. Let me know if you visit this area. Would enjoy rekindling our friendship that began with a book club at Shelburne Farms' Brick House. (You may not remember me: tall lady working on a massive research/book writing projects, which I'm happy to say has come to fruition at long last.) You're welcome to visit my humble abode or we could meet in Hanover, which features many amazing restaurants. Best regards, Niki: 802-238-5306" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(117) "Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_12_4) AppleWebKit/603.1.30 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/10.1 Safari/603.1.30" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" } [1]=> &object(stdClass)#95 (15) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208524" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "4198" ["comment_author"]=> string(15) "Kellie M Kutkey" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "kutkey@integrity.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.20.169.240" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-08 16:47:32" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-08 16:47:32" ["comment_content"]=> string(343) "Hi Corrie! This reminds me of Grandma Pearl saying, "Eat the wormy ones first!"-haha-because you overcame your disappointment and made the best of bruised and mushy apples. I also love that you said NO FOOD GOES TO WASTE IN MY HOUSE. I'm anxious to hear how your pressure cooker helps you in the kitchen. Talk to you soon! Happy eating" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(120) "Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_10_5) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/58.0.3029.96 Safari/537.36" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" } [2]=> &object(stdClass)#94 (15) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208525" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "4198" ["comment_author"]=> string(7) "Bronwyn" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(35) "bronwyn@inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "70.199.136.49" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-13 15:10:13" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-13 15:10:13" ["comment_content"]=> string(157) "Hi mom! I think it's easier to make the best of bruised apples than wormy ones...maybe not? Pearl sure did have a hardy approach to living! Love you, Corrie" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(127) "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; Win64; x64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/46.0.2486.0 Safari/537.36 Edge/13.10586" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(6) "208524" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" } [3]=> &object(stdClass)#93 (15) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208526" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "4198" ["comment_author"]=> string(7) "Bronwyn" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(35) "bronwyn@inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "70.199.136.49" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-13 15:12:05" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-13 15:12:05" ["comment_content"]=> string(196) "Hi Christine! My name is Corrie, and I just started managing Bronwyn's blog! Did you find any new favorite apple types when you moved to the Northeast? I have a new favorite now: McIntosh. YUM!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(127) "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; Win64; x64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/46.0.2486.0 Safari/537.36 Edge/13.10586" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(6) "208523" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" } } ["comments_by_type"]=> array(4) { ["comment"]=> array(4) { [0]=> &object(stdClass)#96 (15) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208523" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "4198" ["comment_author"]=> string(10) "Niki Glanz" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(17) "nikiglanz@aol.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(33) "http://www.memoriestomomentum.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "73.114.21.191" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-08 15:51:32" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-08 15:51:32" ["comment_content"]=> string(772) "Hi Bronwyn, I've made the same transition: Northwest Apples to Northeast, plus I also favor Champlain Orchard apples. Knew some Middlebury College students who worked there parttime and raved about their behind-the-scenes practices. We all know how much that counts. Now I live in Lebanon, NH, but fortunately C.O. also markets to this area. Let me know if you visit this area. Would enjoy rekindling our friendship that began with a book club at Shelburne Farms' Brick House. (You may not remember me: tall lady working on a massive research/book writing projects, which I'm happy to say has come to fruition at long last.) You're welcome to visit my humble abode or we could meet in Hanover, which features many amazing restaurants. Best regards, Niki: 802-238-5306" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(117) "Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_12_4) AppleWebKit/603.1.30 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/10.1 Safari/603.1.30" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" } [1]=> &object(stdClass)#95 (15) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208524" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "4198" ["comment_author"]=> string(15) "Kellie M Kutkey" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "kutkey@integrity.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.20.169.240" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-08 16:47:32" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-08 16:47:32" ["comment_content"]=> string(343) "Hi Corrie! This reminds me of Grandma Pearl saying, "Eat the wormy ones first!"-haha-because you overcame your disappointment and made the best of bruised and mushy apples. I also love that you said NO FOOD GOES TO WASTE IN MY HOUSE. I'm anxious to hear how your pressure cooker helps you in the kitchen. Talk to you soon! Happy eating" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(120) "Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_10_5) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/58.0.3029.96 Safari/537.36" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" } [2]=> &object(stdClass)#94 (15) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208525" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "4198" ["comment_author"]=> string(7) "Bronwyn" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(35) "bronwyn@inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "70.199.136.49" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-13 15:10:13" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-13 15:10:13" ["comment_content"]=> string(157) "Hi mom! I think it's easier to make the best of bruised apples than wormy ones...maybe not? Pearl sure did have a hardy approach to living! Love you, Corrie" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(127) "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; Win64; x64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/46.0.2486.0 Safari/537.36 Edge/13.10586" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(6) "208524" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" } [3]=> &object(stdClass)#93 (15) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208526" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "4198" ["comment_author"]=> string(7) "Bronwyn" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(35) "bronwyn@inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "70.199.136.49" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-13 15:12:05" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-13 15:12:05" ["comment_content"]=> string(196) "Hi Christine! My name is Corrie, and I just started managing Bronwyn's blog! Did you find any new favorite apple types when you moved to the Northeast? I have a new favorite now: McIntosh. YUM!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(127) "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; Win64; x64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/46.0.2486.0 Safari/537.36 Edge/13.10586" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(6) "208523" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" } } ["trackback"]=> array(0) { } ["pingback"]=> array(0) { } ["pings"]=> array(0) { } } }
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2 Responses to “This is Not a Gardening Blog”

  1. I know Bronwyn did not write this post…did I miss an introduction to the lovely young gardener pictured above?

  2. Bronwyn says:

    Yes, you did, Christine. If you check out the previous post, you’ll see my intro to Corrie Austen’s “take-over”. So happy to have her enthusiastic spirit extending the blog’s reach!

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