A culinary online center dedicated to promoting the importance and the joy of American home cooking with an emphasis on local products and talent, celebrating the unique spirit and energy of the new food world ethos, especially in Vermont.

amuse bouche

I love quotes that add meaning to my life. Here are a few to live by:

Approach love and cooking with reckless abandon.
—The Dalai Lama

Rhubarb is a metaphor for finding happiness in your own backyard.
—Garrison Keillor

Buy your snacks from a farmers’ market.
—Michael Pollan

Even when he had a garden in Paris, Thomas Jefferson cultivated Indian corn, “to eat green in our manner, …as quickly after it left the stalk as possible.
—Evan Jones, from American Food

The Intervale – An Unexpected Adventure

A canopy of trees enveloping a narrow dirt road offers an unexpected adventure- a road that branches off on either side every couple hundred feet lacking signage inspires curiosity.  One needs a reason for venturing down to these fertile grounds on the edge of the Winooski river.  These places have some mystery attached.  Burlington’s Intervale offers a multitude of game changing initiatives including community supported agriculture, large scale composting, farm incubators and this year, an online Summervale festival.  It is a model for food and farming organizations throughout the world.  It is working to foster a local food economy that is good for people and the planet.

Reclaiming the Land

 

Any fork will take you to a collection of stunning fields growing everything from flowers to vegetables to herbs in soil that has a rich legacy dating back to the early settlers.  Land that was once farmed by Native Americans a millennium ago is now farmed by new farmers and a few seasoned ones- all who share a passion for farming the land, learning the business of farming, and marketing their bounty to a range of growing markets.

An Incubator for Young Farmers

Each has its own story and this land which has provided an incubator for small farms to medium farms on leased land from the Intervale.  And for many farmers who started here, and later moved on re-settling on their own land in other communities and thrived, there is a sense of gratitude for their early beginnings.

Diggers Mirth Collective Farm

 

Diggers Mirth, collectively owned and operated, is one of the eight farms that have found a home here, and is a perfect example of the farms that lease the land from the Intervale.  Diggers Mirth name was derived from a British Agrarian Collective that operated in the mid 1600’s.  This farm produces and sells vegetables, herbs and honey to the Burlington area. This season, like many other farmers, they have creatively found ways to get their organic bounty to customers through on-line ordering and pick up sites.  (www.diggersmirth.com)

A Rich History

This 700 acres of bottomland within the city limits of Burlington has not always shared the same vitality that it has today. In 1985, Will Raap, founder of Gardeners Supply, was a major force in the restoration of the Intervale land bringing it back to its agricultural roots.  A millennium ago, Native Americans farmed here. Since the 1700’s, a long history of agriculture productivity has existed here. Dairy farming in early 1900, joined by pig farming in 1950, and  vast acres of corn, and other vegetables graced this land for decades.  For twenty-five years until the 1970’s, it was the site of a large municipal dump, bringing the area into decline.   It was Raap’s vision with the help of others who cared about the land, and restored it back to its original roots to create the Intervale as it exists today.  Since 1988, it has reclaimed 350 acres of historical agricultural land and created countless opportunities for farms to thrive.

Summervale Festival goes On-line

 

Summervale, a popular summer community food and music festival will continue once again this year with lively fun music on Thursdays starting July 9th  from 6:30-8pm.  Under a creative virtual format you can enjoy local musicians like Mr. Chris and Friends and Pete’s Posse,  live on the Intervale’s  Facebook and Instagram pages.  Although the Summervale experience will be virtual this year, you can still walk the trails and enjoy the natural areas throughout the season.

Returned To Its Roots

Intervale Farms like Diggers Mirth thrive on this fertile riverbed, but the threat of flooding with the new reality of climate change presents a serious issue for the farmers who are working here.  Yet despite challenges, it remains a vital place that has returned to its roots and is prospering. Farmers who work these fields respect its rich and diverse history as stewards of the land.  It is a place that collectively provides our communities with local bounty that is grown on rich soil with hard work and love, a place that allows us all to envision food systems that support vibrant and thriving communities with a commitment to the power of good food.

Visit:  www.intervale.org  as there is so much more to learn!

In the Kitchen with Bronwyn wishes you a festive and happy Fourth of July as you enjoy your picnics and barbecues sharing good local food!

Thirty-four Vermont farms received a combined total of $73,000 through Vermont Land Trust’s (VTL) new program for farmers affected by COVID-19. For more information on future funding opportunities, contact Maggie Donin at maggie@vlt.org

Posted: 6-28-2020

object(WP_Query)#375 (52) {
  ["query"]=>
  array(1) {
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
  }
  ["query_vars"]=>
  array(63) {
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["error"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["m"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["p"]=>
    int(0)
    ["post_parent"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["name"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["pagename"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["page_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["second"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["minute"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["hour"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["day"]=>
    int(0)
    ["monthnum"]=>
    int(0)
    ["year"]=>
    int(0)
    ["w"]=>
    int(0)
    ["tag"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["cat"]=>
    int(1)
    ["tag_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author_name"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["feed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["tb"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["paged"]=>
    int(0)
    ["meta_key"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["meta_value"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["preview"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["s"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["sentence"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["title"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["fields"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["menu_order"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["embed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["category__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_name__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["ignore_sticky_posts"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["suppress_filters"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["cache_results"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_term_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["lazy_load_term_meta"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_meta_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["post_type"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["posts_per_page"]=>
    int(5)
    ["nopaging"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["comments_per_page"]=>
    string(2) "50"
    ["no_found_rows"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["order"]=>
    string(4) "DESC"
  }
  ["tax_query"]=>
  object(WP_Tax_Query)#1121 (6) {
    ["queries"]=>
    array(1) {
      [0]=>
      array(5) {
        ["taxonomy"]=>
        string(8) "category"
        ["terms"]=>
        array(1) {
          [0]=>
          string(4) "blog"
        }
        ["field"]=>
        string(4) "slug"
        ["operator"]=>
        string(2) "IN"
        ["include_children"]=>
        bool(true)
      }
    }
    ["relation"]=>
    string(3) "AND"
    ["table_aliases":protected]=>
    array(1) {
      [0]=>
      string(21) "wp_term_relationships"
    }
    ["queried_terms"]=>
    array(1) {
      ["category"]=>
      array(2) {
        ["terms"]=>
        array(1) {
          [0]=>
          string(4) "blog"
        }
        ["field"]=>
        string(4) "slug"
      }
    }
    ["primary_table"]=>
    string(8) "wp_posts"
    ["primary_id_column"]=>
    string(2) "ID"
  }
  ["meta_query"]=>
  object(WP_Meta_Query)#1120 (9) {
    ["queries"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["relation"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["table_aliases":protected]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["clauses":protected]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["has_or_relation":protected]=>
    bool(false)
  }
  ["date_query"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["queried_object"]=>
  object(WP_Term)#1250 (16) {
    ["term_id"]=>
    int(1)
    ["name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["slug"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["term_group"]=>
    int(0)
    ["term_taxonomy_id"]=>
    int(1)
    ["taxonomy"]=>
    string(8) "category"
    ["description"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["parent"]=>
    int(0)
    ["count"]=>
    int(175)
    ["filter"]=>
    string(3) "raw"
    ["cat_ID"]=>
    int(1)
    ["category_count"]=>
    int(175)
    ["category_description"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["cat_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["category_nicename"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["category_parent"]=>
    int(0)
  }
  ["queried_object_id"]=>
  int(1)
  ["request"]=>
  string(341) "SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS  wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts  LEFT JOIN wp_term_relationships ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_term_relationships.object_id) WHERE 1=1  AND ( 
  wp_term_relationships.term_taxonomy_id IN (1)
) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post' AND (wp_posts.post_status = 'publish') GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 5"
  ["posts"]=>
  &array(5) {
    [0]=>
    object(WP_Post)#1126 (24) {
      ["ID"]=>
      int(5469)
      ["post_author"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_date"]=>
      string(19) "2020-06-28 07:01:20"
      ["post_date_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2020-06-28 11:01:20"
      ["post_content"]=>
      string(7218) "

A canopy of trees enveloping a narrow dirt road offers an unexpected adventure- a road that branches off on either side every couple hundred feet lacking signage inspires curiosity.  One needs a reason for venturing down to these fertile grounds on the edge of the Winooski river.  These places have some mystery attached.  Burlington’s Intervale offers a multitude of game changing initiatives including community supported agriculture, large scale composting, farm incubators and this year, an online Summervale festival.  It is a model for food and farming organizations throughout the world.  It is working to foster a local food economy that is good for people and the planet.

Reclaiming the Land

 

Any fork will take you to a collection of stunning fields growing everything from flowers to vegetables to herbs in soil that has a rich legacy dating back to the early settlers.  Land that was once farmed by Native Americans a millennium ago is now farmed by new farmers and a few seasoned ones- all who share a passion for farming the land, learning the business of farming, and marketing their bounty to a range of growing markets.

An Incubator for Young Farmers

Each has its own story and this land which has provided an incubator for small farms to medium farms on leased land from the Intervale.  And for many farmers who started here, and later moved on re-settling on their own land in other communities and thrived, there is a sense of gratitude for their early beginnings.

Diggers Mirth Collective Farm

 

Diggers Mirth, collectively owned and operated, is one of the eight farms that have found a home here, and is a perfect example of the farms that lease the land from the Intervale.  Diggers Mirth name was derived from a British Agrarian Collective that operated in the mid 1600’s.  This farm produces and sells vegetables, herbs and honey to the Burlington area. This season, like many other farmers, they have creatively found ways to get their organic bounty to customers through on-line ordering and pick up sites.  (www.diggersmirth.com)

A Rich History

This 700 acres of bottomland within the city limits of Burlington has not always shared the same vitality that it has today. In 1985, Will Raap, founder of Gardeners Supply, was a major force in the restoration of the Intervale land bringing it back to its agricultural roots.  A millennium ago, Native Americans farmed here. Since the 1700’s, a long history of agriculture productivity has existed here. Dairy farming in early 1900, joined by pig farming in 1950, and  vast acres of corn, and other vegetables graced this land for decades.  For twenty-five years until the 1970’s, it was the site of a large municipal dump, bringing the area into decline.   It was Raap’s vision with the help of others who cared about the land, and restored it back to its original roots to create the Intervale as it exists today.  Since 1988, it has reclaimed 350 acres of historical agricultural land and created countless opportunities for farms to thrive.

Summervale Festival goes On-line

 

Summervale, a popular summer community food and music festival will continue once again this year with lively fun music on Thursdays starting July 9th  from 6:30-8pm.  Under a creative virtual format you can enjoy local musicians like Mr. Chris and Friends and Pete’s Posse,  live on the Intervale’s  Facebook and Instagram pages.  Although the Summervale experience will be virtual this year, you can still walk the trails and enjoy the natural areas throughout the season.

Returned To Its Roots

Intervale Farms like Diggers Mirth thrive on this fertile riverbed, but the threat of flooding with the new reality of climate change presents a serious issue for the farmers who are working here.  Yet despite challenges, it remains a vital place that has returned to its roots and is prospering. Farmers who work these fields respect its rich and diverse history as stewards of the land.  It is a place that collectively provides our communities with local bounty that is grown on rich soil with hard work and love, a place that allows us all to envision food systems that support vibrant and thriving communities with a commitment to the power of good food.

Visit:  www.intervale.org  as there is so much more to learn!

In the Kitchen with Bronwyn wishes you a festive and happy Fourth of July as you enjoy your picnics and barbecues sharing good local food!

Thirty-four Vermont farms received a combined total of $73,000 through Vermont Land Trust’s (VTL) new program for farmers affected by COVID-19. For more information on future funding opportunities, contact Maggie Donin at maggie@vlt.org

" ["post_title"]=> string(39) "The Intervale - An Unexpected Adventure" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(361) "Burlington’s Intervale offers a multitude of game changing initiatives including community supported agriculture, large scale composting, farm incubators and this year, an online Summervale festival.  It is a model for food and farming organizations throughout the world.  It is working to foster a local food economy that is good for people and the planet." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(37) "the-intervale-an-unexpected-adventure" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-06-28 14:02:31" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-28 18:02:31" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5469" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "1" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#1124 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5454) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-06-06 06:13:29" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-06 10:13:29" ["post_content"]=> string(6766) "

Trying to find a silver lining in the middle of a pandemic is a lot to ask.    Our lives have been upended.   Gathering around our dinner tables with homecooked meals, sharing more family time than ever before feels comforting. With more time to spare we are thinking more about how and where our food is grown.

Greg Georgaklis, President and founder of Farmers to You

Unprecedented Demand

Farmers to You, an organization started ten years ago, has stepped up to meet an unprecedented demand for good, healthy, and safe food.  With streamlined systems in place, it quickly revved up to provide families in urban communities healthy locally sourced food.

Years before the pandemic, Greg Georgaklis, President and founder of Farmers to You offered me an opportunity to travel with him to Boston- their primary market.    I tagged along visiting various neighborhood delivery sites around the greater Boston area for a story I was writing.   Our first stop was a Waldorf School in Lexington, Massachusetts- timed perfectly when parents were picking up their children.  What struck me immediately was the sense of joy and excitement that radiated from customers who gathered as soon as the truck arrived to collect their bags of Vermont bounty.

Actually orgasmic

I recall one customer who noticed my pen in hand and asked, “Have you ever tried this yogurt? - it’s the best I’ve ever tasted- it’s actually orgasmic!”  Before I could even answer, she handed it to me, “Here, please take one of mine- you need to taste this.”   A stranger to me had offered up one of her prized items.   With a container of maple yogurt labeled Butterworks Farm in hand, she waited and watched me dip my spoon.  She was right.  Delightfully creamy, light, and intensely flavorful; to this day, I have never forgotten her kind gesture.

Ten years later

Now, ten years later, the food Farmers to You delivers to their customers has a similar effect- the only difference is now they offer over 300 products sourced from 100 farms and food purveyors.  Food harvested to order ensuring peak freshness is their daily mantra.

Recently, my husband and I devoured an intensely flavorful and tender steak that had been raised at Tilldale Farm.  Greg shared it had everything to do with the farmer’s well cared for Red Devon cattle, who were 100% grass fed.

Greg’s philosophy is clear and simple- if you build a healthy food system grown, in organic regenerative soil, and create a seamless distribution – you will nurture happy, satisfied customers. Exactly why Farmers to You has amassed 1,400 Boston-area customers, with 150 in Vermont, and a growing wait list.

That word is flavor

One word defines the difference between food often trucked 1,500 miles to our tables versus food grown in healthy soil within a 150- mile radius, delivered within days of harvest, and raised humanely.  “That word is flavor,” Greg shares.   “Once families notice the difference- they taste it- they want more of it - and they are willing to pay for it.  They rarely return to their old ways.”

Our biggest challenge

The lettuce, cherry tomatoes, and kale in our dinner salads was just picked from farmer’s fields.   And yes, it costs more but the benefits of “fresh off the farm” far outweigh the extra dollars allocated.  The biggest challenge for Greg and his dedicated team is keeping a consistent customer base that sticks with it- as farmers increase their yield they rely on a steady stream of buyers.

Healthy Farms, Healthy Families, Healthy Planet

Local food systems are flourishing.  If we can stick with it, embrace it, and recognize the health benefits for our bodies and our planet-this new way of sourcing our food will be life changing.   

  Visit:   www.farmerstoyou.com   

(Laurie Caswell Burke)

" ["post_title"]=> string(22) "Pandemic Silver Lining" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(261) "The pandemic has us gathering around our dinner tables with homecooked meals and sharing more family time than ever before. With more time to spare, we are also thinking more about how and where our food is grown. Eat and shop confidently with Farmers to You." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(22) "pandemic-silver-lining" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-06-06 06:13:33" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-06 10:13:33" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5454" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "2" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#1128 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5400) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-05-16 07:10:42" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-16 11:10:42" ["post_content"]=> string(5332) "

Doesn’t it feel like Mother Nature seems to be guiding us through the pandemic with subtle hints –the birds sing more sweetly, the signs of spring, the early- blooming daffodils and tulips always hopeful, seem even more so this year.  If we listen and observe this time of pause, it can offer each of us an unprecedented opportunity to deepen our appreciation for our precious natural resources- our connection to the land and respect for something that is larger than ourselves.

I’ve always celebrated our local farmers but in this time of isolation and reduced access to food sources, I’ve embraced the opportunity to navigate the farming world I live in.  Amidst all the COVID19 changes, our access to locally grown food close to home has remained constant and comforting.  Dedicated farmers have been working tirelessly to provide the produce, meat and dairy products we’ve grown used to. There’s been no lack of lettuce, spinach, arugula, kale, eggs, chicken, and grass-fed beef for our tables.  With “curbside pick-up” and online order forms, local farmers have instituted creative, safe ways for us to access food, as nimbly as the most sophisticated urban food source.  And many –working with neighboring farms-  have banded together to sell farm products on a single website, to help each other and to make our local shopping easier.

This is no easy task to create an abundant food source when national supplies are threatened.  But once again, Vermont shines as a leader in demonstrating that small farms and innovative farming offers an excellent solution to provide healthy food for our families.

In the weeks ahead, Bronwyn and I will delve into the stories of Vermont Farmers who provide us with an edible landscape close to home, we hope you will join us in our appreciation for how fortunate we are to have so many committed individuals who have chosen to work the land for us.  We live in a remarkable state and we know it.   As we wake up to the possibility of a new way of living our lives, let’s envision one that is more intentional, sustainable  -one that brings deeper meaning. 

Who knew there could be so many cleverly- named farms in our state? Someday Farm, Fairy Tale Farm, Last Resort Farm, Reap and Sow, Bread and Butter Farm -those along with others, Trillium Hill Farm and Jasper Hill that honor a place or family tradition.  And, behind each name, there is a story, a story of how they evolved, and how this choice of working the land with devotion and fortitude has made our state a mecca for small farm farming.

As Bronwyn and I continue to experience the wonders of local and organic, we are eager to share these stories and images of the farmers who are continually evolving the concept of farming in Vermont with crops never grown here before –rice, artichokes, micro-greens- and methods that are innovative, changing the image of the state from black and white cows and pails of maple sap to cheese caves and large composting facilities, state –of- the -art greenhouses and  high-end sorting machinery.

Join us in the coming months to read the stories of what we promise will be a cornucopia of deliciousness as we dig deeper into the land and the lives of our farmers. We hope you will enjoy the tapestry of stories and photos of the men and women we call “Heroes” and the beauty of farms willing to innovate for the life and health of our state and of our world.

Laurie Caswell Burke

Catch up with Bronwyn on Food52 in a memory of an iconic lunch with Judith Jones and Julia Clancy.

" ["post_title"]=> string(46) "Digging the Dirt for a More Sustainable Future" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(222) "Farmers have always been vital, but the recent national food supply challenges have shed a refreshed spotlight on the work of our local farmers. Each farm, and the people behind it, have a story. These are their stories." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(46) "digging-the-dirt-for-a-more-sustainable-future" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-05-25 05:40:25" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-25 09:40:25" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5400" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "1" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#1129 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5380) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-05-02 06:14:44" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-02 10:14:44" ["post_content"]=> string(5794) "

Curbside pickup - Creative Measures to Support Our Local Farmers

If there was ever a time to truly embrace our local farmers – it is NOW.

It seems that locally grown food and sourced products are more available than ever.  My journey of discovering how to access local bounty in these current times has introduced a new appreciation for the creativity and resiliency of our farming community.

Perusing the websites of several farms this week made me ravenous.  I found a multitude of options at farms all within a 15 minute drive from my home.  My task: select a farm, visit the menu of options and place my on-line order.  Our farmers and their crews have been working tirelessly to keep up with demand.   Engaging us first through their enticing websites, with displays of colorful photos of their available goods, there are clear, step by step instructions, that explain how to order, pay, and safely gather through curb side pick-up.  Some items do sell out, so best to have alternative selections in mind.

This week, I chose Philo Ridge Farm, located in Charlotte, which promised a beautiful drive and an opportunity to stretch my legs.  

All I had to do was visit the farm’s website, make my order and wait for a call to provide my payment information and pick up time.  Philo Ridge Farm’s website is stunning- a feast for your eyes alone. I placed my order on a Wednesday through their online order form, and on Thursday received a call with my pick -up options and made a phone payment.

On Friday, I arrived at noon, the sun was streaming through the clouds over the distant green mountains. I was the only car in the parking lot.  Greeted with a friendly hello, a young woman clad in a mask carefully handed me a brown bag, my name inscribed on the front.   Other carefully distanced bags scribed with names sat on the outside table- many with beautiful bouquets of fresh colorful flowers poking out.  Next time, I will be sure to include these in my order.

I glimpsed at some magnificent Belted Galloway cows, their tails happily swishing back in forth. I took in the endless pastures, bales of hay, the stately red barn, and freshly planted fields, appreciating all of it.

Once home, I took out each item from my bag -organic sweet potatoes from Laughing Child Farm, beets from Pitchfork Farm, clean baby taters from Pete’s Greens, Full Moon Farm parsnips, and kale and fresh lettuce mix from Philo Ridge Farm.   Homemade chicken broth, too!   One stop at this beautiful farm, close to home, and I had produce from multiple farms, topped off with a satisfying feeling that, in a small way, I had supported each of them.

As our family enjoyed meals this week, created from the fresh local bounty, we felt a deep sense of gratitude for all the individuals who worked incredibly hard to bring this healthy food to our tables.

Countless farms, including nearby Bread and Butter Farm in South Burlington, and Trillium Hill Farm in Hinesburg, are just a few of many in our beautiful state who offer locally grown and sourced goods.

Stay tuned as we visit our farmers all over the green mountain state as ITKWB begins our “Farmer Stories.”   As we celebrate our farmers, we look forward to sharing a more in depth look at their lives, their work, and the impact they collectively have on ours.

" ["post_title"]=> string(11) "Shop Local!" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(10) "shop-local" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-05-02 06:14:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-02 10:14:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5380" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#1246 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5373) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-04-25 15:04:05" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-25 19:04:05" ["post_content"]=> string(2699) "

The perfect Rhubarb Pie

Does it seem possible? We’re half-way through...! Here in Vermont, we’re mostly all in agreement with our governor’s decision to continue to stay home until May 16th. And what are we all doing during this period of confinement? We’re cooking! It’s been a bonanza of cooking creativity, an outpouring of sharing recipes and photos, a chorus of What’s for Dinner!

Everyone I know is sourcing and preparing meals with abandon. Many of us are buying from local farms. Quite a tribute to what I’ve always said is the most satisfying of all art forms. Not only do you have the fun of creating something others can enjoy, but as the chef, you get immediate satisfaction - the applause comes almost at once. Especially now, when the evening meal can be the highlight of a day in lockdown.

Here are some of the dozens of photos of dishes prepared by friends and family over the last month. They range from three friends making roast chicken and sharing –virtually- what to do with leftovers, to a birthday party celebrated by cousins in Vienna, to a pasta supper by a rising star of the conducting world riding it out in a Swiss chalet, to a dinner made by a real chef for his pregnant wife in Madison, Wisconsin….and everything in between. Tacos with chorizo sausage and mushrooms, corn chowder with frozen corn, local cream and homemade chicken stock; and for one cook, me, who has never made a perfect pie, the perfect rhubarb pie. I call it Quarantine Cuisine!

" ["post_title"]=> string(28) "Quarantine Cuisine - Part II" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(123) "Food always brings joy, but this is especially true now, as we live in a world of social isolation from the ones we love. " ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(26) "quarantine-cuisine-part-ii" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-25 15:04:09" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-25 19:04:09" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5373" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "4" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post_count"]=> int(5) ["current_post"]=> int(0) ["in_the_loop"]=> bool(true) ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#1126 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5469) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-06-28 07:01:20" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-28 11:01:20" ["post_content"]=> string(7218) "

A canopy of trees enveloping a narrow dirt road offers an unexpected adventure- a road that branches off on either side every couple hundred feet lacking signage inspires curiosity.  One needs a reason for venturing down to these fertile grounds on the edge of the Winooski river.  These places have some mystery attached.  Burlington’s Intervale offers a multitude of game changing initiatives including community supported agriculture, large scale composting, farm incubators and this year, an online Summervale festival.  It is a model for food and farming organizations throughout the world.  It is working to foster a local food economy that is good for people and the planet.

Reclaiming the Land

 

Any fork will take you to a collection of stunning fields growing everything from flowers to vegetables to herbs in soil that has a rich legacy dating back to the early settlers.  Land that was once farmed by Native Americans a millennium ago is now farmed by new farmers and a few seasoned ones- all who share a passion for farming the land, learning the business of farming, and marketing their bounty to a range of growing markets.

An Incubator for Young Farmers

Each has its own story and this land which has provided an incubator for small farms to medium farms on leased land from the Intervale.  And for many farmers who started here, and later moved on re-settling on their own land in other communities and thrived, there is a sense of gratitude for their early beginnings.

Diggers Mirth Collective Farm

 

Diggers Mirth, collectively owned and operated, is one of the eight farms that have found a home here, and is a perfect example of the farms that lease the land from the Intervale.  Diggers Mirth name was derived from a British Agrarian Collective that operated in the mid 1600’s.  This farm produces and sells vegetables, herbs and honey to the Burlington area. This season, like many other farmers, they have creatively found ways to get their organic bounty to customers through on-line ordering and pick up sites.  (www.diggersmirth.com)

A Rich History

This 700 acres of bottomland within the city limits of Burlington has not always shared the same vitality that it has today. In 1985, Will Raap, founder of Gardeners Supply, was a major force in the restoration of the Intervale land bringing it back to its agricultural roots.  A millennium ago, Native Americans farmed here. Since the 1700’s, a long history of agriculture productivity has existed here. Dairy farming in early 1900, joined by pig farming in 1950, and  vast acres of corn, and other vegetables graced this land for decades.  For twenty-five years until the 1970’s, it was the site of a large municipal dump, bringing the area into decline.   It was Raap’s vision with the help of others who cared about the land, and restored it back to its original roots to create the Intervale as it exists today.  Since 1988, it has reclaimed 350 acres of historical agricultural land and created countless opportunities for farms to thrive.

Summervale Festival goes On-line

 

Summervale, a popular summer community food and music festival will continue once again this year with lively fun music on Thursdays starting July 9th  from 6:30-8pm.  Under a creative virtual format you can enjoy local musicians like Mr. Chris and Friends and Pete’s Posse,  live on the Intervale’s  Facebook and Instagram pages.  Although the Summervale experience will be virtual this year, you can still walk the trails and enjoy the natural areas throughout the season.

Returned To Its Roots

Intervale Farms like Diggers Mirth thrive on this fertile riverbed, but the threat of flooding with the new reality of climate change presents a serious issue for the farmers who are working here.  Yet despite challenges, it remains a vital place that has returned to its roots and is prospering. Farmers who work these fields respect its rich and diverse history as stewards of the land.  It is a place that collectively provides our communities with local bounty that is grown on rich soil with hard work and love, a place that allows us all to envision food systems that support vibrant and thriving communities with a commitment to the power of good food.

Visit:  www.intervale.org  as there is so much more to learn!

In the Kitchen with Bronwyn wishes you a festive and happy Fourth of July as you enjoy your picnics and barbecues sharing good local food!

Thirty-four Vermont farms received a combined total of $73,000 through Vermont Land Trust’s (VTL) new program for farmers affected by COVID-19. For more information on future funding opportunities, contact Maggie Donin at maggie@vlt.org

" ["post_title"]=> string(39) "The Intervale - An Unexpected Adventure" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(361) "Burlington’s Intervale offers a multitude of game changing initiatives including community supported agriculture, large scale composting, farm incubators and this year, an online Summervale festival.  It is a model for food and farming organizations throughout the world.  It is working to foster a local food economy that is good for people and the planet." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(37) "the-intervale-an-unexpected-adventure" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-06-28 14:02:31" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-28 18:02:31" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5469" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "1" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["comment_count"]=> int(0) ["current_comment"]=> int(-1) ["found_posts"]=> string(3) "132" ["max_num_pages"]=> float(27) ["max_num_comment_pages"]=> int(0) ["is_single"]=> bool(false) ["is_preview"]=> bool(false) ["is_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_archive"]=> bool(true) ["is_date"]=> bool(false) ["is_year"]=> bool(false) ["is_month"]=> bool(false) ["is_day"]=> bool(false) ["is_time"]=> bool(false) ["is_author"]=> bool(false) ["is_category"]=> bool(true) ["is_tag"]=> bool(false) ["is_tax"]=> bool(false) ["is_search"]=> bool(false) ["is_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_comment_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_trackback"]=> bool(false) ["is_home"]=> bool(false) ["is_privacy_policy"]=> bool(false) ["is_404"]=> bool(false) ["is_embed"]=> bool(false) ["is_paged"]=> bool(false) ["is_admin"]=> bool(false) ["is_attachment"]=> bool(false) ["is_singular"]=> bool(false) ["is_robots"]=> bool(false) ["is_posts_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_post_type_archive"]=> bool(false) ["query_vars_hash":"WP_Query":private]=> string(32) "b239cec030b7b08e2301315b28070261" ["query_vars_changed":"WP_Query":private]=> bool(false) ["thumbnails_cached"]=> bool(false) ["stopwords":"WP_Query":private]=> NULL ["compat_fields":"WP_Query":private]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(15) "query_vars_hash" [1]=> string(18) "query_vars_changed" } ["compat_methods":"WP_Query":private]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(16) "init_query_flags" [1]=> string(15) "parse_tax_query" } }
SUBSCRIBE TO THIS BLOG’S FEED

One response to “The Intervale – An Unexpected Adventure”

  1. Love this post, Laurie! The Intervale is such a treasure here in Burlington. What other city has such an agricultural resource?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


Print Friendly, PDF & Email

 

Pandemic Silver Lining

Trying to find a silver lining in the middle of a pandemic is a lot to ask.    Our lives have been upended.   Gathering around our dinner tables with homecooked meals, sharing more family time than ever before feels comforting. With more time to spare we are thinking more about how and where our food is grown.

Greg Georgaklis, President and founder of Farmers to You

Unprecedented Demand

Farmers to You, an organization started ten years ago, has stepped up to meet an unprecedented demand for good, healthy, and safe food.  With streamlined systems in place, it quickly revved up to provide families in urban communities healthy locally sourced food.

Years before the pandemic, Greg Georgaklis, President and founder of Farmers to You offered me an opportunity to travel with him to Boston- their primary market.    I tagged along visiting various neighborhood delivery sites around the greater Boston area for a story I was writing.   Our first stop was a Waldorf School in Lexington, Massachusetts- timed perfectly when parents were picking up their children.  What struck me immediately was the sense of joy and excitement that radiated from customers who gathered as soon as the truck arrived to collect their bags of Vermont bounty.

Actually orgasmic

I recall one customer who noticed my pen in hand and asked, “Have you ever tried this yogurt? – it’s the best I’ve ever tasted- it’s actually orgasmic!”  Before I could even answer, she handed it to me, “Here, please take one of mine- you need to taste this.”   A stranger to me had offered up one of her prized items.   With a container of maple yogurt labeled Butterworks Farm in hand, she waited and watched me dip my spoon.  She was right.  Delightfully creamy, light, and intensely flavorful; to this day, I have never forgotten her kind gesture.

Ten years later

Now, ten years later, the food Farmers to You delivers to their customers has a similar effect- the only difference is now they offer over 300 products sourced from 100 farms and food purveyors.  Food harvested to order ensuring peak freshness is their daily mantra.

Recently, my husband and I devoured an intensely flavorful and tender steak that had been raised at Tilldale Farm.  Greg shared it had everything to do with the farmer’s well cared for Red Devon cattle, who were 100% grass fed.

Greg’s philosophy is clear and simple- if you build a healthy food system grown, in organic regenerative soil, and create a seamless distribution – you will nurture happy, satisfied customers. Exactly why Farmers to You has amassed 1,400 Boston-area customers, with 150 in Vermont, and a growing wait list.

That word is flavor

One word defines the difference between food often trucked 1,500 miles to our tables versus food grown in healthy soil within a 150- mile radius, delivered within days of harvest, and raised humanely.  “That word is flavor,” Greg shares.   “Once families notice the difference- they taste it- they want more of it – and they are willing to pay for it.  They rarely return to their old ways.”

Our biggest challenge

The lettuce, cherry tomatoes, and kale in our dinner salads was just picked from farmer’s fields.   And yes, it costs more but the benefits of “fresh off the farm” far outweigh the extra dollars allocated.  The biggest challenge for Greg and his dedicated team is keeping a consistent customer base that sticks with it- as farmers increase their yield they rely on a steady stream of buyers.

Healthy Farms, Healthy Families, Healthy Planet

Local food systems are flourishing.  If we can stick with it, embrace it, and recognize the health benefits for our bodies and our planet-this new way of sourcing our food will be life changing.   

  Visit:   www.farmerstoyou.com   

(Laurie Caswell Burke)

Posted: 6-6-2020

object(WP_Query)#375 (54) {
  ["query"]=>
  array(1) {
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
  }
  ["query_vars"]=>
  array(63) {
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["error"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["m"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["p"]=>
    int(0)
    ["post_parent"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["name"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["pagename"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["page_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["second"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["minute"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["hour"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["day"]=>
    int(0)
    ["monthnum"]=>
    int(0)
    ["year"]=>
    int(0)
    ["w"]=>
    int(0)
    ["tag"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["cat"]=>
    int(1)
    ["tag_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author_name"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["feed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["tb"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["paged"]=>
    int(0)
    ["meta_key"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["meta_value"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["preview"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["s"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["sentence"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["title"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["fields"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["menu_order"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["embed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["category__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_name__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["ignore_sticky_posts"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["suppress_filters"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["cache_results"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_term_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["lazy_load_term_meta"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_meta_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["post_type"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["posts_per_page"]=>
    int(5)
    ["nopaging"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["comments_per_page"]=>
    string(2) "50"
    ["no_found_rows"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["order"]=>
    string(4) "DESC"
  }
  ["tax_query"]=>
  object(WP_Tax_Query)#1121 (6) {
    ["queries"]=>
    array(1) {
      [0]=>
      array(5) {
        ["taxonomy"]=>
        string(8) "category"
        ["terms"]=>
        array(1) {
          [0]=>
          string(4) "blog"
        }
        ["field"]=>
        string(4) "slug"
        ["operator"]=>
        string(2) "IN"
        ["include_children"]=>
        bool(true)
      }
    }
    ["relation"]=>
    string(3) "AND"
    ["table_aliases":protected]=>
    array(1) {
      [0]=>
      string(21) "wp_term_relationships"
    }
    ["queried_terms"]=>
    array(1) {
      ["category"]=>
      array(2) {
        ["terms"]=>
        array(1) {
          [0]=>
          string(4) "blog"
        }
        ["field"]=>
        string(4) "slug"
      }
    }
    ["primary_table"]=>
    string(8) "wp_posts"
    ["primary_id_column"]=>
    string(2) "ID"
  }
  ["meta_query"]=>
  object(WP_Meta_Query)#1120 (9) {
    ["queries"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["relation"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["table_aliases":protected]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["clauses":protected]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["has_or_relation":protected]=>
    bool(false)
  }
  ["date_query"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["queried_object"]=>
  object(WP_Term)#1250 (16) {
    ["term_id"]=>
    int(1)
    ["name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["slug"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["term_group"]=>
    int(0)
    ["term_taxonomy_id"]=>
    int(1)
    ["taxonomy"]=>
    string(8) "category"
    ["description"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["parent"]=>
    int(0)
    ["count"]=>
    int(175)
    ["filter"]=>
    string(3) "raw"
    ["cat_ID"]=>
    int(1)
    ["category_count"]=>
    int(175)
    ["category_description"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["cat_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["category_nicename"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["category_parent"]=>
    int(0)
  }
  ["queried_object_id"]=>
  int(1)
  ["request"]=>
  string(341) "SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS  wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts  LEFT JOIN wp_term_relationships ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_term_relationships.object_id) WHERE 1=1  AND ( 
  wp_term_relationships.term_taxonomy_id IN (1)
) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post' AND (wp_posts.post_status = 'publish') GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 5"
  ["posts"]=>
  &array(5) {
    [0]=>
    object(WP_Post)#1126 (24) {
      ["ID"]=>
      int(5469)
      ["post_author"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_date"]=>
      string(19) "2020-06-28 07:01:20"
      ["post_date_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2020-06-28 11:01:20"
      ["post_content"]=>
      string(7218) "

A canopy of trees enveloping a narrow dirt road offers an unexpected adventure- a road that branches off on either side every couple hundred feet lacking signage inspires curiosity.  One needs a reason for venturing down to these fertile grounds on the edge of the Winooski river.  These places have some mystery attached.  Burlington’s Intervale offers a multitude of game changing initiatives including community supported agriculture, large scale composting, farm incubators and this year, an online Summervale festival.  It is a model for food and farming organizations throughout the world.  It is working to foster a local food economy that is good for people and the planet.

Reclaiming the Land

 

Any fork will take you to a collection of stunning fields growing everything from flowers to vegetables to herbs in soil that has a rich legacy dating back to the early settlers.  Land that was once farmed by Native Americans a millennium ago is now farmed by new farmers and a few seasoned ones- all who share a passion for farming the land, learning the business of farming, and marketing their bounty to a range of growing markets.

An Incubator for Young Farmers

Each has its own story and this land which has provided an incubator for small farms to medium farms on leased land from the Intervale.  And for many farmers who started here, and later moved on re-settling on their own land in other communities and thrived, there is a sense of gratitude for their early beginnings.

Diggers Mirth Collective Farm

 

Diggers Mirth, collectively owned and operated, is one of the eight farms that have found a home here, and is a perfect example of the farms that lease the land from the Intervale.  Diggers Mirth name was derived from a British Agrarian Collective that operated in the mid 1600’s.  This farm produces and sells vegetables, herbs and honey to the Burlington area. This season, like many other farmers, they have creatively found ways to get their organic bounty to customers through on-line ordering and pick up sites.  (www.diggersmirth.com)

A Rich History

This 700 acres of bottomland within the city limits of Burlington has not always shared the same vitality that it has today. In 1985, Will Raap, founder of Gardeners Supply, was a major force in the restoration of the Intervale land bringing it back to its agricultural roots.  A millennium ago, Native Americans farmed here. Since the 1700’s, a long history of agriculture productivity has existed here. Dairy farming in early 1900, joined by pig farming in 1950, and  vast acres of corn, and other vegetables graced this land for decades.  For twenty-five years until the 1970’s, it was the site of a large municipal dump, bringing the area into decline.   It was Raap’s vision with the help of others who cared about the land, and restored it back to its original roots to create the Intervale as it exists today.  Since 1988, it has reclaimed 350 acres of historical agricultural land and created countless opportunities for farms to thrive.

Summervale Festival goes On-line

 

Summervale, a popular summer community food and music festival will continue once again this year with lively fun music on Thursdays starting July 9th  from 6:30-8pm.  Under a creative virtual format you can enjoy local musicians like Mr. Chris and Friends and Pete’s Posse,  live on the Intervale’s  Facebook and Instagram pages.  Although the Summervale experience will be virtual this year, you can still walk the trails and enjoy the natural areas throughout the season.

Returned To Its Roots

Intervale Farms like Diggers Mirth thrive on this fertile riverbed, but the threat of flooding with the new reality of climate change presents a serious issue for the farmers who are working here.  Yet despite challenges, it remains a vital place that has returned to its roots and is prospering. Farmers who work these fields respect its rich and diverse history as stewards of the land.  It is a place that collectively provides our communities with local bounty that is grown on rich soil with hard work and love, a place that allows us all to envision food systems that support vibrant and thriving communities with a commitment to the power of good food.

Visit:  www.intervale.org  as there is so much more to learn!

In the Kitchen with Bronwyn wishes you a festive and happy Fourth of July as you enjoy your picnics and barbecues sharing good local food!

Thirty-four Vermont farms received a combined total of $73,000 through Vermont Land Trust’s (VTL) new program for farmers affected by COVID-19. For more information on future funding opportunities, contact Maggie Donin at maggie@vlt.org

" ["post_title"]=> string(39) "The Intervale - An Unexpected Adventure" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(361) "Burlington’s Intervale offers a multitude of game changing initiatives including community supported agriculture, large scale composting, farm incubators and this year, an online Summervale festival.  It is a model for food and farming organizations throughout the world.  It is working to foster a local food economy that is good for people and the planet." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(37) "the-intervale-an-unexpected-adventure" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-06-28 14:02:31" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-28 18:02:31" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5469" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "1" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#1124 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5454) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-06-06 06:13:29" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-06 10:13:29" ["post_content"]=> string(6766) "

Trying to find a silver lining in the middle of a pandemic is a lot to ask.    Our lives have been upended.   Gathering around our dinner tables with homecooked meals, sharing more family time than ever before feels comforting. With more time to spare we are thinking more about how and where our food is grown.

Greg Georgaklis, President and founder of Farmers to You

Unprecedented Demand

Farmers to You, an organization started ten years ago, has stepped up to meet an unprecedented demand for good, healthy, and safe food.  With streamlined systems in place, it quickly revved up to provide families in urban communities healthy locally sourced food.

Years before the pandemic, Greg Georgaklis, President and founder of Farmers to You offered me an opportunity to travel with him to Boston- their primary market.    I tagged along visiting various neighborhood delivery sites around the greater Boston area for a story I was writing.   Our first stop was a Waldorf School in Lexington, Massachusetts- timed perfectly when parents were picking up their children.  What struck me immediately was the sense of joy and excitement that radiated from customers who gathered as soon as the truck arrived to collect their bags of Vermont bounty.

Actually orgasmic

I recall one customer who noticed my pen in hand and asked, “Have you ever tried this yogurt? - it’s the best I’ve ever tasted- it’s actually orgasmic!”  Before I could even answer, she handed it to me, “Here, please take one of mine- you need to taste this.”   A stranger to me had offered up one of her prized items.   With a container of maple yogurt labeled Butterworks Farm in hand, she waited and watched me dip my spoon.  She was right.  Delightfully creamy, light, and intensely flavorful; to this day, I have never forgotten her kind gesture.

Ten years later

Now, ten years later, the food Farmers to You delivers to their customers has a similar effect- the only difference is now they offer over 300 products sourced from 100 farms and food purveyors.  Food harvested to order ensuring peak freshness is their daily mantra.

Recently, my husband and I devoured an intensely flavorful and tender steak that had been raised at Tilldale Farm.  Greg shared it had everything to do with the farmer’s well cared for Red Devon cattle, who were 100% grass fed.

Greg’s philosophy is clear and simple- if you build a healthy food system grown, in organic regenerative soil, and create a seamless distribution – you will nurture happy, satisfied customers. Exactly why Farmers to You has amassed 1,400 Boston-area customers, with 150 in Vermont, and a growing wait list.

That word is flavor

One word defines the difference between food often trucked 1,500 miles to our tables versus food grown in healthy soil within a 150- mile radius, delivered within days of harvest, and raised humanely.  “That word is flavor,” Greg shares.   “Once families notice the difference- they taste it- they want more of it - and they are willing to pay for it.  They rarely return to their old ways.”

Our biggest challenge

The lettuce, cherry tomatoes, and kale in our dinner salads was just picked from farmer’s fields.   And yes, it costs more but the benefits of “fresh off the farm” far outweigh the extra dollars allocated.  The biggest challenge for Greg and his dedicated team is keeping a consistent customer base that sticks with it- as farmers increase their yield they rely on a steady stream of buyers.

Healthy Farms, Healthy Families, Healthy Planet

Local food systems are flourishing.  If we can stick with it, embrace it, and recognize the health benefits for our bodies and our planet-this new way of sourcing our food will be life changing.   

  Visit:   www.farmerstoyou.com   

(Laurie Caswell Burke)

" ["post_title"]=> string(22) "Pandemic Silver Lining" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(261) "The pandemic has us gathering around our dinner tables with homecooked meals and sharing more family time than ever before. With more time to spare, we are also thinking more about how and where our food is grown. Eat and shop confidently with Farmers to You." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(22) "pandemic-silver-lining" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-06-06 06:13:33" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-06 10:13:33" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5454" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "2" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#1128 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5400) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-05-16 07:10:42" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-16 11:10:42" ["post_content"]=> string(5332) "

Doesn’t it feel like Mother Nature seems to be guiding us through the pandemic with subtle hints –the birds sing more sweetly, the signs of spring, the early- blooming daffodils and tulips always hopeful, seem even more so this year.  If we listen and observe this time of pause, it can offer each of us an unprecedented opportunity to deepen our appreciation for our precious natural resources- our connection to the land and respect for something that is larger than ourselves.

I’ve always celebrated our local farmers but in this time of isolation and reduced access to food sources, I’ve embraced the opportunity to navigate the farming world I live in.  Amidst all the COVID19 changes, our access to locally grown food close to home has remained constant and comforting.  Dedicated farmers have been working tirelessly to provide the produce, meat and dairy products we’ve grown used to. There’s been no lack of lettuce, spinach, arugula, kale, eggs, chicken, and grass-fed beef for our tables.  With “curbside pick-up” and online order forms, local farmers have instituted creative, safe ways for us to access food, as nimbly as the most sophisticated urban food source.  And many –working with neighboring farms-  have banded together to sell farm products on a single website, to help each other and to make our local shopping easier.

This is no easy task to create an abundant food source when national supplies are threatened.  But once again, Vermont shines as a leader in demonstrating that small farms and innovative farming offers an excellent solution to provide healthy food for our families.

In the weeks ahead, Bronwyn and I will delve into the stories of Vermont Farmers who provide us with an edible landscape close to home, we hope you will join us in our appreciation for how fortunate we are to have so many committed individuals who have chosen to work the land for us.  We live in a remarkable state and we know it.   As we wake up to the possibility of a new way of living our lives, let’s envision one that is more intentional, sustainable  -one that brings deeper meaning. 

Who knew there could be so many cleverly- named farms in our state? Someday Farm, Fairy Tale Farm, Last Resort Farm, Reap and Sow, Bread and Butter Farm -those along with others, Trillium Hill Farm and Jasper Hill that honor a place or family tradition.  And, behind each name, there is a story, a story of how they evolved, and how this choice of working the land with devotion and fortitude has made our state a mecca for small farm farming.

As Bronwyn and I continue to experience the wonders of local and organic, we are eager to share these stories and images of the farmers who are continually evolving the concept of farming in Vermont with crops never grown here before –rice, artichokes, micro-greens- and methods that are innovative, changing the image of the state from black and white cows and pails of maple sap to cheese caves and large composting facilities, state –of- the -art greenhouses and  high-end sorting machinery.

Join us in the coming months to read the stories of what we promise will be a cornucopia of deliciousness as we dig deeper into the land and the lives of our farmers. We hope you will enjoy the tapestry of stories and photos of the men and women we call “Heroes” and the beauty of farms willing to innovate for the life and health of our state and of our world.

Laurie Caswell Burke

Catch up with Bronwyn on Food52 in a memory of an iconic lunch with Judith Jones and Julia Clancy.

" ["post_title"]=> string(46) "Digging the Dirt for a More Sustainable Future" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(222) "Farmers have always been vital, but the recent national food supply challenges have shed a refreshed spotlight on the work of our local farmers. Each farm, and the people behind it, have a story. These are their stories." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(46) "digging-the-dirt-for-a-more-sustainable-future" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-05-25 05:40:25" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-25 09:40:25" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5400" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "1" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#1129 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5380) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-05-02 06:14:44" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-02 10:14:44" ["post_content"]=> string(5794) "

Curbside pickup - Creative Measures to Support Our Local Farmers

If there was ever a time to truly embrace our local farmers – it is NOW.

It seems that locally grown food and sourced products are more available than ever.  My journey of discovering how to access local bounty in these current times has introduced a new appreciation for the creativity and resiliency of our farming community.

Perusing the websites of several farms this week made me ravenous.  I found a multitude of options at farms all within a 15 minute drive from my home.  My task: select a farm, visit the menu of options and place my on-line order.  Our farmers and their crews have been working tirelessly to keep up with demand.   Engaging us first through their enticing websites, with displays of colorful photos of their available goods, there are clear, step by step instructions, that explain how to order, pay, and safely gather through curb side pick-up.  Some items do sell out, so best to have alternative selections in mind.

This week, I chose Philo Ridge Farm, located in Charlotte, which promised a beautiful drive and an opportunity to stretch my legs.  

All I had to do was visit the farm’s website, make my order and wait for a call to provide my payment information and pick up time.  Philo Ridge Farm’s website is stunning- a feast for your eyes alone. I placed my order on a Wednesday through their online order form, and on Thursday received a call with my pick -up options and made a phone payment.

On Friday, I arrived at noon, the sun was streaming through the clouds over the distant green mountains. I was the only car in the parking lot.  Greeted with a friendly hello, a young woman clad in a mask carefully handed me a brown bag, my name inscribed on the front.   Other carefully distanced bags scribed with names sat on the outside table- many with beautiful bouquets of fresh colorful flowers poking out.  Next time, I will be sure to include these in my order.

I glimpsed at some magnificent Belted Galloway cows, their tails happily swishing back in forth. I took in the endless pastures, bales of hay, the stately red barn, and freshly planted fields, appreciating all of it.

Once home, I took out each item from my bag -organic sweet potatoes from Laughing Child Farm, beets from Pitchfork Farm, clean baby taters from Pete’s Greens, Full Moon Farm parsnips, and kale and fresh lettuce mix from Philo Ridge Farm.   Homemade chicken broth, too!   One stop at this beautiful farm, close to home, and I had produce from multiple farms, topped off with a satisfying feeling that, in a small way, I had supported each of them.

As our family enjoyed meals this week, created from the fresh local bounty, we felt a deep sense of gratitude for all the individuals who worked incredibly hard to bring this healthy food to our tables.

Countless farms, including nearby Bread and Butter Farm in South Burlington, and Trillium Hill Farm in Hinesburg, are just a few of many in our beautiful state who offer locally grown and sourced goods.

Stay tuned as we visit our farmers all over the green mountain state as ITKWB begins our “Farmer Stories.”   As we celebrate our farmers, we look forward to sharing a more in depth look at their lives, their work, and the impact they collectively have on ours.

" ["post_title"]=> string(11) "Shop Local!" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(10) "shop-local" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-05-02 06:14:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-02 10:14:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5380" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#1246 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5373) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-04-25 15:04:05" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-25 19:04:05" ["post_content"]=> string(2699) "

The perfect Rhubarb Pie

Does it seem possible? We’re half-way through...! Here in Vermont, we’re mostly all in agreement with our governor’s decision to continue to stay home until May 16th. And what are we all doing during this period of confinement? We’re cooking! It’s been a bonanza of cooking creativity, an outpouring of sharing recipes and photos, a chorus of What’s for Dinner!

Everyone I know is sourcing and preparing meals with abandon. Many of us are buying from local farms. Quite a tribute to what I’ve always said is the most satisfying of all art forms. Not only do you have the fun of creating something others can enjoy, but as the chef, you get immediate satisfaction - the applause comes almost at once. Especially now, when the evening meal can be the highlight of a day in lockdown.

Here are some of the dozens of photos of dishes prepared by friends and family over the last month. They range from three friends making roast chicken and sharing –virtually- what to do with leftovers, to a birthday party celebrated by cousins in Vienna, to a pasta supper by a rising star of the conducting world riding it out in a Swiss chalet, to a dinner made by a real chef for his pregnant wife in Madison, Wisconsin….and everything in between. Tacos with chorizo sausage and mushrooms, corn chowder with frozen corn, local cream and homemade chicken stock; and for one cook, me, who has never made a perfect pie, the perfect rhubarb pie. I call it Quarantine Cuisine!

" ["post_title"]=> string(28) "Quarantine Cuisine - Part II" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(123) "Food always brings joy, but this is especially true now, as we live in a world of social isolation from the ones we love. " ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(26) "quarantine-cuisine-part-ii" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-25 15:04:09" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-25 19:04:09" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5373" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "4" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post_count"]=> int(5) ["current_post"]=> int(1) ["in_the_loop"]=> bool(true) ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#1124 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5454) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-06-06 06:13:29" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-06 10:13:29" ["post_content"]=> string(6766) "

Trying to find a silver lining in the middle of a pandemic is a lot to ask.    Our lives have been upended.   Gathering around our dinner tables with homecooked meals, sharing more family time than ever before feels comforting. With more time to spare we are thinking more about how and where our food is grown.

Greg Georgaklis, President and founder of Farmers to You

Unprecedented Demand

Farmers to You, an organization started ten years ago, has stepped up to meet an unprecedented demand for good, healthy, and safe food.  With streamlined systems in place, it quickly revved up to provide families in urban communities healthy locally sourced food.

Years before the pandemic, Greg Georgaklis, President and founder of Farmers to You offered me an opportunity to travel with him to Boston- their primary market.    I tagged along visiting various neighborhood delivery sites around the greater Boston area for a story I was writing.   Our first stop was a Waldorf School in Lexington, Massachusetts- timed perfectly when parents were picking up their children.  What struck me immediately was the sense of joy and excitement that radiated from customers who gathered as soon as the truck arrived to collect their bags of Vermont bounty.

Actually orgasmic

I recall one customer who noticed my pen in hand and asked, “Have you ever tried this yogurt? - it’s the best I’ve ever tasted- it’s actually orgasmic!”  Before I could even answer, she handed it to me, “Here, please take one of mine- you need to taste this.”   A stranger to me had offered up one of her prized items.   With a container of maple yogurt labeled Butterworks Farm in hand, she waited and watched me dip my spoon.  She was right.  Delightfully creamy, light, and intensely flavorful; to this day, I have never forgotten her kind gesture.

Ten years later

Now, ten years later, the food Farmers to You delivers to their customers has a similar effect- the only difference is now they offer over 300 products sourced from 100 farms and food purveyors.  Food harvested to order ensuring peak freshness is their daily mantra.

Recently, my husband and I devoured an intensely flavorful and tender steak that had been raised at Tilldale Farm.  Greg shared it had everything to do with the farmer’s well cared for Red Devon cattle, who were 100% grass fed.

Greg’s philosophy is clear and simple- if you build a healthy food system grown, in organic regenerative soil, and create a seamless distribution – you will nurture happy, satisfied customers. Exactly why Farmers to You has amassed 1,400 Boston-area customers, with 150 in Vermont, and a growing wait list.

That word is flavor

One word defines the difference between food often trucked 1,500 miles to our tables versus food grown in healthy soil within a 150- mile radius, delivered within days of harvest, and raised humanely.  “That word is flavor,” Greg shares.   “Once families notice the difference- they taste it- they want more of it - and they are willing to pay for it.  They rarely return to their old ways.”

Our biggest challenge

The lettuce, cherry tomatoes, and kale in our dinner salads was just picked from farmer’s fields.   And yes, it costs more but the benefits of “fresh off the farm” far outweigh the extra dollars allocated.  The biggest challenge for Greg and his dedicated team is keeping a consistent customer base that sticks with it- as farmers increase their yield they rely on a steady stream of buyers.

Healthy Farms, Healthy Families, Healthy Planet

Local food systems are flourishing.  If we can stick with it, embrace it, and recognize the health benefits for our bodies and our planet-this new way of sourcing our food will be life changing.   

  Visit:   www.farmerstoyou.com   

(Laurie Caswell Burke)

" ["post_title"]=> string(22) "Pandemic Silver Lining" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(261) "The pandemic has us gathering around our dinner tables with homecooked meals and sharing more family time than ever before. With more time to spare, we are also thinking more about how and where our food is grown. Eat and shop confidently with Farmers to You." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(22) "pandemic-silver-lining" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-06-06 06:13:33" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-06 10:13:33" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5454" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "2" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["comments"]=> array(1) { [0]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1313 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "209748" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5469" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Bronwyn Dunne" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "bronwyndunne@mac.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(34) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.91.160.255" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2020-06-30 10:32:16" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-30 14:32:16" ["comment_content"]=> string(127) "Love this post, Laurie! The Intervale is such a treasure here in Burlington. What other city has such an agricultural resource?" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(119) "Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_14_6) AppleWebKit/605.1.15 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/13.1.1 Safari/605.1.15" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } } ["comment_count"]=> int(1) ["current_comment"]=> int(-1) ["found_posts"]=> string(3) "132" ["max_num_pages"]=> float(27) ["max_num_comment_pages"]=> int(0) ["is_single"]=> bool(false) ["is_preview"]=> bool(false) ["is_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_archive"]=> bool(true) ["is_date"]=> bool(false) ["is_year"]=> bool(false) ["is_month"]=> bool(false) ["is_day"]=> bool(false) ["is_time"]=> bool(false) ["is_author"]=> bool(false) ["is_category"]=> bool(true) ["is_tag"]=> bool(false) ["is_tax"]=> bool(false) ["is_search"]=> bool(false) ["is_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_comment_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_trackback"]=> bool(false) ["is_home"]=> bool(false) ["is_privacy_policy"]=> bool(false) ["is_404"]=> bool(false) ["is_embed"]=> bool(false) ["is_paged"]=> bool(false) ["is_admin"]=> bool(false) ["is_attachment"]=> bool(false) ["is_singular"]=> bool(false) ["is_robots"]=> bool(false) ["is_posts_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_post_type_archive"]=> bool(false) ["query_vars_hash":"WP_Query":private]=> string(32) "b239cec030b7b08e2301315b28070261" ["query_vars_changed":"WP_Query":private]=> bool(false) ["thumbnails_cached"]=> bool(false) ["stopwords":"WP_Query":private]=> NULL ["compat_fields":"WP_Query":private]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(15) "query_vars_hash" [1]=> string(18) "query_vars_changed" } ["compat_methods":"WP_Query":private]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(16) "init_query_flags" [1]=> string(15) "parse_tax_query" } ["comments_by_type"]=> array(4) { ["comment"]=> array(1) { [0]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1313 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "209748" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5469" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Bronwyn Dunne" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "bronwyndunne@mac.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(34) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.91.160.255" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2020-06-30 10:32:16" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-30 14:32:16" ["comment_content"]=> string(127) "Love this post, Laurie! The Intervale is such a treasure here in Burlington. What other city has such an agricultural resource?" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(119) "Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_14_6) AppleWebKit/605.1.15 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/13.1.1 Safari/605.1.15" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } } ["trackback"]=> array(0) { } ["pingback"]=> array(0) { } ["pings"]=> array(0) { } } }
SUBSCRIBE TO THIS BLOG’S FEED

2 responses to “Pandemic Silver Lining”

  1. Dana Engel says:

    Good job! It made me wish I had the same contact in Berkeley.

  2. You make me feel so good about what’s going on in Vermont. We know we have great farmers here but knowing you live in CA -a state that is famous for its large farms- makes me even happier. I wish Greg could distribute there!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


Print Friendly, PDF & Email

 

Digging the Dirt for a More Sustainable Future

Doesn’t it feel like Mother Nature seems to be guiding us through the pandemic with subtle hints –the birds sing more sweetly, the signs of spring, the early- blooming daffodils and tulips always hopeful, seem even more so this year.  If we listen and observe this time of pause, it can offer each of us an unprecedented opportunity to deepen our appreciation for our precious natural resources- our connection to the land and respect for something that is larger than ourselves.

I’ve always celebrated our local farmers but in this time of isolation and reduced access to food sources, I’ve embraced the opportunity to navigate the farming world I live in.  Amidst all the COVID19 changes, our access to locally grown food close to home has remained constant and comforting.  Dedicated farmers have been working tirelessly to provide the produce, meat and dairy products we’ve grown used to. There’s been no lack of lettuce, spinach, arugula, kale, eggs, chicken, and grass-fed beef for our tables.  With “curbside pick-up” and online order forms, local farmers have instituted creative, safe ways for us to access food, as nimbly as the most sophisticated urban food source.  And many –working with neighboring farms-  have banded together to sell farm products on a single website, to help each other and to make our local shopping easier.

This is no easy task to create an abundant food source when national supplies are threatened.  But once again, Vermont shines as a leader in demonstrating that small farms and innovative farming offers an excellent solution to provide healthy food for our families.

In the weeks ahead, Bronwyn and I will delve into the stories of Vermont Farmers who provide us with an edible landscape close to home, we hope you will join us in our appreciation for how fortunate we are to have so many committed individuals who have chosen to work the land for us.  We live in a remarkable state and we know it.   As we wake up to the possibility of a new way of living our lives, let’s envision one that is more intentional, sustainable  -one that brings deeper meaning. 

Who knew there could be so many cleverly- named farms in our state? Someday Farm, Fairy Tale Farm, Last Resort Farm, Reap and Sow, Bread and Butter Farm -those along with others, Trillium Hill Farm and Jasper Hill that honor a place or family tradition.  And, behind each name, there is a story, a story of how they evolved, and how this choice of working the land with devotion and fortitude has made our state a mecca for small farm farming.

As Bronwyn and I continue to experience the wonders of local and organic, we are eager to share these stories and images of the farmers who are continually evolving the concept of farming in Vermont with crops never grown here before –rice, artichokes, micro-greens- and methods that are innovative, changing the image of the state from black and white cows and pails of maple sap to cheese caves and large composting facilities, state –of- the -art greenhouses and  high-end sorting machinery.

Join us in the coming months to read the stories of what we promise will be a cornucopia of deliciousness as we dig deeper into the land and the lives of our farmers. We hope you will enjoy the tapestry of stories and photos of the men and women we call “Heroes” and the beauty of farms willing to innovate for the life and health of our state and of our world.

Laurie Caswell Burke

Catch up with Bronwyn on Food52 in a memory of an iconic lunch with Judith Jones and Julia Clancy.

Posted: 5-16-2020

object(WP_Query)#375 (54) {
  ["query"]=>
  array(1) {
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
  }
  ["query_vars"]=>
  array(63) {
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["error"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["m"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["p"]=>
    int(0)
    ["post_parent"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["name"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["pagename"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["page_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["second"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["minute"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["hour"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["day"]=>
    int(0)
    ["monthnum"]=>
    int(0)
    ["year"]=>
    int(0)
    ["w"]=>
    int(0)
    ["tag"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["cat"]=>
    int(1)
    ["tag_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author_name"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["feed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["tb"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["paged"]=>
    int(0)
    ["meta_key"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["meta_value"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["preview"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["s"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["sentence"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["title"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["fields"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["menu_order"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["embed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["category__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_name__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["ignore_sticky_posts"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["suppress_filters"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["cache_results"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_term_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["lazy_load_term_meta"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_meta_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["post_type"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["posts_per_page"]=>
    int(5)
    ["nopaging"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["comments_per_page"]=>
    string(2) "50"
    ["no_found_rows"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["order"]=>
    string(4) "DESC"
  }
  ["tax_query"]=>
  object(WP_Tax_Query)#1121 (6) {
    ["queries"]=>
    array(1) {
      [0]=>
      array(5) {
        ["taxonomy"]=>
        string(8) "category"
        ["terms"]=>
        array(1) {
          [0]=>
          string(4) "blog"
        }
        ["field"]=>
        string(4) "slug"
        ["operator"]=>
        string(2) "IN"
        ["include_children"]=>
        bool(true)
      }
    }
    ["relation"]=>
    string(3) "AND"
    ["table_aliases":protected]=>
    array(1) {
      [0]=>
      string(21) "wp_term_relationships"
    }
    ["queried_terms"]=>
    array(1) {
      ["category"]=>
      array(2) {
        ["terms"]=>
        array(1) {
          [0]=>
          string(4) "blog"
        }
        ["field"]=>
        string(4) "slug"
      }
    }
    ["primary_table"]=>
    string(8) "wp_posts"
    ["primary_id_column"]=>
    string(2) "ID"
  }
  ["meta_query"]=>
  object(WP_Meta_Query)#1120 (9) {
    ["queries"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["relation"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["table_aliases":protected]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["clauses":protected]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["has_or_relation":protected]=>
    bool(false)
  }
  ["date_query"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["queried_object"]=>
  object(WP_Term)#1250 (16) {
    ["term_id"]=>
    int(1)
    ["name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["slug"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["term_group"]=>
    int(0)
    ["term_taxonomy_id"]=>
    int(1)
    ["taxonomy"]=>
    string(8) "category"
    ["description"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["parent"]=>
    int(0)
    ["count"]=>
    int(175)
    ["filter"]=>
    string(3) "raw"
    ["cat_ID"]=>
    int(1)
    ["category_count"]=>
    int(175)
    ["category_description"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["cat_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["category_nicename"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["category_parent"]=>
    int(0)
  }
  ["queried_object_id"]=>
  int(1)
  ["request"]=>
  string(341) "SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS  wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts  LEFT JOIN wp_term_relationships ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_term_relationships.object_id) WHERE 1=1  AND ( 
  wp_term_relationships.term_taxonomy_id IN (1)
) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post' AND (wp_posts.post_status = 'publish') GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 5"
  ["posts"]=>
  &array(5) {
    [0]=>
    object(WP_Post)#1126 (24) {
      ["ID"]=>
      int(5469)
      ["post_author"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_date"]=>
      string(19) "2020-06-28 07:01:20"
      ["post_date_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2020-06-28 11:01:20"
      ["post_content"]=>
      string(7218) "

A canopy of trees enveloping a narrow dirt road offers an unexpected adventure- a road that branches off on either side every couple hundred feet lacking signage inspires curiosity.  One needs a reason for venturing down to these fertile grounds on the edge of the Winooski river.  These places have some mystery attached.  Burlington’s Intervale offers a multitude of game changing initiatives including community supported agriculture, large scale composting, farm incubators and this year, an online Summervale festival.  It is a model for food and farming organizations throughout the world.  It is working to foster a local food economy that is good for people and the planet.

Reclaiming the Land

 

Any fork will take you to a collection of stunning fields growing everything from flowers to vegetables to herbs in soil that has a rich legacy dating back to the early settlers.  Land that was once farmed by Native Americans a millennium ago is now farmed by new farmers and a few seasoned ones- all who share a passion for farming the land, learning the business of farming, and marketing their bounty to a range of growing markets.

An Incubator for Young Farmers

Each has its own story and this land which has provided an incubator for small farms to medium farms on leased land from the Intervale.  And for many farmers who started here, and later moved on re-settling on their own land in other communities and thrived, there is a sense of gratitude for their early beginnings.

Diggers Mirth Collective Farm

 

Diggers Mirth, collectively owned and operated, is one of the eight farms that have found a home here, and is a perfect example of the farms that lease the land from the Intervale.  Diggers Mirth name was derived from a British Agrarian Collective that operated in the mid 1600’s.  This farm produces and sells vegetables, herbs and honey to the Burlington area. This season, like many other farmers, they have creatively found ways to get their organic bounty to customers through on-line ordering and pick up sites.  (www.diggersmirth.com)

A Rich History

This 700 acres of bottomland within the city limits of Burlington has not always shared the same vitality that it has today. In 1985, Will Raap, founder of Gardeners Supply, was a major force in the restoration of the Intervale land bringing it back to its agricultural roots.  A millennium ago, Native Americans farmed here. Since the 1700’s, a long history of agriculture productivity has existed here. Dairy farming in early 1900, joined by pig farming in 1950, and  vast acres of corn, and other vegetables graced this land for decades.  For twenty-five years until the 1970’s, it was the site of a large municipal dump, bringing the area into decline.   It was Raap’s vision with the help of others who cared about the land, and restored it back to its original roots to create the Intervale as it exists today.  Since 1988, it has reclaimed 350 acres of historical agricultural land and created countless opportunities for farms to thrive.

Summervale Festival goes On-line

 

Summervale, a popular summer community food and music festival will continue once again this year with lively fun music on Thursdays starting July 9th  from 6:30-8pm.  Under a creative virtual format you can enjoy local musicians like Mr. Chris and Friends and Pete’s Posse,  live on the Intervale’s  Facebook and Instagram pages.  Although the Summervale experience will be virtual this year, you can still walk the trails and enjoy the natural areas throughout the season.

Returned To Its Roots

Intervale Farms like Diggers Mirth thrive on this fertile riverbed, but the threat of flooding with the new reality of climate change presents a serious issue for the farmers who are working here.  Yet despite challenges, it remains a vital place that has returned to its roots and is prospering. Farmers who work these fields respect its rich and diverse history as stewards of the land.  It is a place that collectively provides our communities with local bounty that is grown on rich soil with hard work and love, a place that allows us all to envision food systems that support vibrant and thriving communities with a commitment to the power of good food.

Visit:  www.intervale.org  as there is so much more to learn!

In the Kitchen with Bronwyn wishes you a festive and happy Fourth of July as you enjoy your picnics and barbecues sharing good local food!

Thirty-four Vermont farms received a combined total of $73,000 through Vermont Land Trust’s (VTL) new program for farmers affected by COVID-19. For more information on future funding opportunities, contact Maggie Donin at maggie@vlt.org

" ["post_title"]=> string(39) "The Intervale - An Unexpected Adventure" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(361) "Burlington’s Intervale offers a multitude of game changing initiatives including community supported agriculture, large scale composting, farm incubators and this year, an online Summervale festival.  It is a model for food and farming organizations throughout the world.  It is working to foster a local food economy that is good for people and the planet." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(37) "the-intervale-an-unexpected-adventure" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-06-28 14:02:31" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-28 18:02:31" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5469" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "1" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#1124 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5454) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-06-06 06:13:29" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-06 10:13:29" ["post_content"]=> string(6766) "

Trying to find a silver lining in the middle of a pandemic is a lot to ask.    Our lives have been upended.   Gathering around our dinner tables with homecooked meals, sharing more family time than ever before feels comforting. With more time to spare we are thinking more about how and where our food is grown.

Greg Georgaklis, President and founder of Farmers to You

Unprecedented Demand

Farmers to You, an organization started ten years ago, has stepped up to meet an unprecedented demand for good, healthy, and safe food.  With streamlined systems in place, it quickly revved up to provide families in urban communities healthy locally sourced food.

Years before the pandemic, Greg Georgaklis, President and founder of Farmers to You offered me an opportunity to travel with him to Boston- their primary market.    I tagged along visiting various neighborhood delivery sites around the greater Boston area for a story I was writing.   Our first stop was a Waldorf School in Lexington, Massachusetts- timed perfectly when parents were picking up their children.  What struck me immediately was the sense of joy and excitement that radiated from customers who gathered as soon as the truck arrived to collect their bags of Vermont bounty.

Actually orgasmic

I recall one customer who noticed my pen in hand and asked, “Have you ever tried this yogurt? - it’s the best I’ve ever tasted- it’s actually orgasmic!”  Before I could even answer, she handed it to me, “Here, please take one of mine- you need to taste this.”   A stranger to me had offered up one of her prized items.   With a container of maple yogurt labeled Butterworks Farm in hand, she waited and watched me dip my spoon.  She was right.  Delightfully creamy, light, and intensely flavorful; to this day, I have never forgotten her kind gesture.

Ten years later

Now, ten years later, the food Farmers to You delivers to their customers has a similar effect- the only difference is now they offer over 300 products sourced from 100 farms and food purveyors.  Food harvested to order ensuring peak freshness is their daily mantra.

Recently, my husband and I devoured an intensely flavorful and tender steak that had been raised at Tilldale Farm.  Greg shared it had everything to do with the farmer’s well cared for Red Devon cattle, who were 100% grass fed.

Greg’s philosophy is clear and simple- if you build a healthy food system grown, in organic regenerative soil, and create a seamless distribution – you will nurture happy, satisfied customers. Exactly why Farmers to You has amassed 1,400 Boston-area customers, with 150 in Vermont, and a growing wait list.

That word is flavor

One word defines the difference between food often trucked 1,500 miles to our tables versus food grown in healthy soil within a 150- mile radius, delivered within days of harvest, and raised humanely.  “That word is flavor,” Greg shares.   “Once families notice the difference- they taste it- they want more of it - and they are willing to pay for it.  They rarely return to their old ways.”

Our biggest challenge

The lettuce, cherry tomatoes, and kale in our dinner salads was just picked from farmer’s fields.   And yes, it costs more but the benefits of “fresh off the farm” far outweigh the extra dollars allocated.  The biggest challenge for Greg and his dedicated team is keeping a consistent customer base that sticks with it- as farmers increase their yield they rely on a steady stream of buyers.

Healthy Farms, Healthy Families, Healthy Planet

Local food systems are flourishing.  If we can stick with it, embrace it, and recognize the health benefits for our bodies and our planet-this new way of sourcing our food will be life changing.   

  Visit:   www.farmerstoyou.com   

(Laurie Caswell Burke)

" ["post_title"]=> string(22) "Pandemic Silver Lining" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(261) "The pandemic has us gathering around our dinner tables with homecooked meals and sharing more family time than ever before. With more time to spare, we are also thinking more about how and where our food is grown. Eat and shop confidently with Farmers to You." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(22) "pandemic-silver-lining" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-06-06 06:13:33" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-06 10:13:33" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5454" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "2" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#1128 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5400) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-05-16 07:10:42" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-16 11:10:42" ["post_content"]=> string(5332) "

Doesn’t it feel like Mother Nature seems to be guiding us through the pandemic with subtle hints –the birds sing more sweetly, the signs of spring, the early- blooming daffodils and tulips always hopeful, seem even more so this year.  If we listen and observe this time of pause, it can offer each of us an unprecedented opportunity to deepen our appreciation for our precious natural resources- our connection to the land and respect for something that is larger than ourselves.

I’ve always celebrated our local farmers but in this time of isolation and reduced access to food sources, I’ve embraced the opportunity to navigate the farming world I live in.  Amidst all the COVID19 changes, our access to locally grown food close to home has remained constant and comforting.  Dedicated farmers have been working tirelessly to provide the produce, meat and dairy products we’ve grown used to. There’s been no lack of lettuce, spinach, arugula, kale, eggs, chicken, and grass-fed beef for our tables.  With “curbside pick-up” and online order forms, local farmers have instituted creative, safe ways for us to access food, as nimbly as the most sophisticated urban food source.  And many –working with neighboring farms-  have banded together to sell farm products on a single website, to help each other and to make our local shopping easier.

This is no easy task to create an abundant food source when national supplies are threatened.  But once again, Vermont shines as a leader in demonstrating that small farms and innovative farming offers an excellent solution to provide healthy food for our families.

In the weeks ahead, Bronwyn and I will delve into the stories of Vermont Farmers who provide us with an edible landscape close to home, we hope you will join us in our appreciation for how fortunate we are to have so many committed individuals who have chosen to work the land for us.  We live in a remarkable state and we know it.   As we wake up to the possibility of a new way of living our lives, let’s envision one that is more intentional, sustainable  -one that brings deeper meaning. 

Who knew there could be so many cleverly- named farms in our state? Someday Farm, Fairy Tale Farm, Last Resort Farm, Reap and Sow, Bread and Butter Farm -those along with others, Trillium Hill Farm and Jasper Hill that honor a place or family tradition.  And, behind each name, there is a story, a story of how they evolved, and how this choice of working the land with devotion and fortitude has made our state a mecca for small farm farming.

As Bronwyn and I continue to experience the wonders of local and organic, we are eager to share these stories and images of the farmers who are continually evolving the concept of farming in Vermont with crops never grown here before –rice, artichokes, micro-greens- and methods that are innovative, changing the image of the state from black and white cows and pails of maple sap to cheese caves and large composting facilities, state –of- the -art greenhouses and  high-end sorting machinery.

Join us in the coming months to read the stories of what we promise will be a cornucopia of deliciousness as we dig deeper into the land and the lives of our farmers. We hope you will enjoy the tapestry of stories and photos of the men and women we call “Heroes” and the beauty of farms willing to innovate for the life and health of our state and of our world.

Laurie Caswell Burke

Catch up with Bronwyn on Food52 in a memory of an iconic lunch with Judith Jones and Julia Clancy.

" ["post_title"]=> string(46) "Digging the Dirt for a More Sustainable Future" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(222) "Farmers have always been vital, but the recent national food supply challenges have shed a refreshed spotlight on the work of our local farmers. Each farm, and the people behind it, have a story. These are their stories." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(46) "digging-the-dirt-for-a-more-sustainable-future" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-05-25 05:40:25" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-25 09:40:25" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5400" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "1" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#1129 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5380) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-05-02 06:14:44" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-02 10:14:44" ["post_content"]=> string(5794) "

Curbside pickup - Creative Measures to Support Our Local Farmers

If there was ever a time to truly embrace our local farmers – it is NOW.

It seems that locally grown food and sourced products are more available than ever.  My journey of discovering how to access local bounty in these current times has introduced a new appreciation for the creativity and resiliency of our farming community.

Perusing the websites of several farms this week made me ravenous.  I found a multitude of options at farms all within a 15 minute drive from my home.  My task: select a farm, visit the menu of options and place my on-line order.  Our farmers and their crews have been working tirelessly to keep up with demand.   Engaging us first through their enticing websites, with displays of colorful photos of their available goods, there are clear, step by step instructions, that explain how to order, pay, and safely gather through curb side pick-up.  Some items do sell out, so best to have alternative selections in mind.

This week, I chose Philo Ridge Farm, located in Charlotte, which promised a beautiful drive and an opportunity to stretch my legs.  

All I had to do was visit the farm’s website, make my order and wait for a call to provide my payment information and pick up time.  Philo Ridge Farm’s website is stunning- a feast for your eyes alone. I placed my order on a Wednesday through their online order form, and on Thursday received a call with my pick -up options and made a phone payment.

On Friday, I arrived at noon, the sun was streaming through the clouds over the distant green mountains. I was the only car in the parking lot.  Greeted with a friendly hello, a young woman clad in a mask carefully handed me a brown bag, my name inscribed on the front.   Other carefully distanced bags scribed with names sat on the outside table- many with beautiful bouquets of fresh colorful flowers poking out.  Next time, I will be sure to include these in my order.

I glimpsed at some magnificent Belted Galloway cows, their tails happily swishing back in forth. I took in the endless pastures, bales of hay, the stately red barn, and freshly planted fields, appreciating all of it.

Once home, I took out each item from my bag -organic sweet potatoes from Laughing Child Farm, beets from Pitchfork Farm, clean baby taters from Pete’s Greens, Full Moon Farm parsnips, and kale and fresh lettuce mix from Philo Ridge Farm.   Homemade chicken broth, too!   One stop at this beautiful farm, close to home, and I had produce from multiple farms, topped off with a satisfying feeling that, in a small way, I had supported each of them.

As our family enjoyed meals this week, created from the fresh local bounty, we felt a deep sense of gratitude for all the individuals who worked incredibly hard to bring this healthy food to our tables.

Countless farms, including nearby Bread and Butter Farm in South Burlington, and Trillium Hill Farm in Hinesburg, are just a few of many in our beautiful state who offer locally grown and sourced goods.

Stay tuned as we visit our farmers all over the green mountain state as ITKWB begins our “Farmer Stories.”   As we celebrate our farmers, we look forward to sharing a more in depth look at their lives, their work, and the impact they collectively have on ours.

" ["post_title"]=> string(11) "Shop Local!" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(10) "shop-local" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-05-02 06:14:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-02 10:14:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5380" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#1246 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5373) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-04-25 15:04:05" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-25 19:04:05" ["post_content"]=> string(2699) "

The perfect Rhubarb Pie

Does it seem possible? We’re half-way through...! Here in Vermont, we’re mostly all in agreement with our governor’s decision to continue to stay home until May 16th. And what are we all doing during this period of confinement? We’re cooking! It’s been a bonanza of cooking creativity, an outpouring of sharing recipes and photos, a chorus of What’s for Dinner!

Everyone I know is sourcing and preparing meals with abandon. Many of us are buying from local farms. Quite a tribute to what I’ve always said is the most satisfying of all art forms. Not only do you have the fun of creating something others can enjoy, but as the chef, you get immediate satisfaction - the applause comes almost at once. Especially now, when the evening meal can be the highlight of a day in lockdown.

Here are some of the dozens of photos of dishes prepared by friends and family over the last month. They range from three friends making roast chicken and sharing –virtually- what to do with leftovers, to a birthday party celebrated by cousins in Vienna, to a pasta supper by a rising star of the conducting world riding it out in a Swiss chalet, to a dinner made by a real chef for his pregnant wife in Madison, Wisconsin….and everything in between. Tacos with chorizo sausage and mushrooms, corn chowder with frozen corn, local cream and homemade chicken stock; and for one cook, me, who has never made a perfect pie, the perfect rhubarb pie. I call it Quarantine Cuisine!

" ["post_title"]=> string(28) "Quarantine Cuisine - Part II" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(123) "Food always brings joy, but this is especially true now, as we live in a world of social isolation from the ones we love. " ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(26) "quarantine-cuisine-part-ii" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-25 15:04:09" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-25 19:04:09" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5373" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "4" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post_count"]=> int(5) ["current_post"]=> int(2) ["in_the_loop"]=> bool(true) ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#1128 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5400) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-05-16 07:10:42" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-16 11:10:42" ["post_content"]=> string(5332) "

Doesn’t it feel like Mother Nature seems to be guiding us through the pandemic with subtle hints –the birds sing more sweetly, the signs of spring, the early- blooming daffodils and tulips always hopeful, seem even more so this year.  If we listen and observe this time of pause, it can offer each of us an unprecedented opportunity to deepen our appreciation for our precious natural resources- our connection to the land and respect for something that is larger than ourselves.

I’ve always celebrated our local farmers but in this time of isolation and reduced access to food sources, I’ve embraced the opportunity to navigate the farming world I live in.  Amidst all the COVID19 changes, our access to locally grown food close to home has remained constant and comforting.  Dedicated farmers have been working tirelessly to provide the produce, meat and dairy products we’ve grown used to. There’s been no lack of lettuce, spinach, arugula, kale, eggs, chicken, and grass-fed beef for our tables.  With “curbside pick-up” and online order forms, local farmers have instituted creative, safe ways for us to access food, as nimbly as the most sophisticated urban food source.  And many –working with neighboring farms-  have banded together to sell farm products on a single website, to help each other and to make our local shopping easier.

This is no easy task to create an abundant food source when national supplies are threatened.  But once again, Vermont shines as a leader in demonstrating that small farms and innovative farming offers an excellent solution to provide healthy food for our families.

In the weeks ahead, Bronwyn and I will delve into the stories of Vermont Farmers who provide us with an edible landscape close to home, we hope you will join us in our appreciation for how fortunate we are to have so many committed individuals who have chosen to work the land for us.  We live in a remarkable state and we know it.   As we wake up to the possibility of a new way of living our lives, let’s envision one that is more intentional, sustainable  -one that brings deeper meaning. 

Who knew there could be so many cleverly- named farms in our state? Someday Farm, Fairy Tale Farm, Last Resort Farm, Reap and Sow, Bread and Butter Farm -those along with others, Trillium Hill Farm and Jasper Hill that honor a place or family tradition.  And, behind each name, there is a story, a story of how they evolved, and how this choice of working the land with devotion and fortitude has made our state a mecca for small farm farming.

As Bronwyn and I continue to experience the wonders of local and organic, we are eager to share these stories and images of the farmers who are continually evolving the concept of farming in Vermont with crops never grown here before –rice, artichokes, micro-greens- and methods that are innovative, changing the image of the state from black and white cows and pails of maple sap to cheese caves and large composting facilities, state –of- the -art greenhouses and  high-end sorting machinery.

Join us in the coming months to read the stories of what we promise will be a cornucopia of deliciousness as we dig deeper into the land and the lives of our farmers. We hope you will enjoy the tapestry of stories and photos of the men and women we call “Heroes” and the beauty of farms willing to innovate for the life and health of our state and of our world.

Laurie Caswell Burke

Catch up with Bronwyn on Food52 in a memory of an iconic lunch with Judith Jones and Julia Clancy.

" ["post_title"]=> string(46) "Digging the Dirt for a More Sustainable Future" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(222) "Farmers have always been vital, but the recent national food supply challenges have shed a refreshed spotlight on the work of our local farmers. Each farm, and the people behind it, have a story. These are their stories." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(46) "digging-the-dirt-for-a-more-sustainable-future" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-05-25 05:40:25" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-25 09:40:25" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5400" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "1" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["comments"]=> array(2) { [0]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1333 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "209637" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5454" ["comment_author"]=> string(10) "Dana Engel" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "danaengel0@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "108.74.161.38" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2020-06-07 17:20:21" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-07 21:20:21" ["comment_content"]=> string(61) "Good job! It made me wish I had the same contact in Berkeley." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(137) "Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; CPU iPhone OS 13_4_1 like Mac OS X) AppleWebKit/605.1.15 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/13.1 Mobile/15E148 Safari/604.1" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [1]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1291 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "209638" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5454" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Bronwyn Dunne" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "bronwyndunne@mac.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(34) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.91.160.255" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2020-06-07 23:00:10" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-08 03:00:10" ["comment_content"]=> string(224) "You make me feel so good about what's going on in Vermont. We know we have great farmers here but knowing you live in CA -a state that is famous for its large farms- makes me even happier. I wish Greg could distribute there!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(119) "Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_14_6) AppleWebKit/605.1.15 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/13.1.1 Safari/605.1.15" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } } ["comment_count"]=> int(2) ["current_comment"]=> int(-1) ["found_posts"]=> string(3) "132" ["max_num_pages"]=> float(27) ["max_num_comment_pages"]=> int(0) ["is_single"]=> bool(false) ["is_preview"]=> bool(false) ["is_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_archive"]=> bool(true) ["is_date"]=> bool(false) ["is_year"]=> bool(false) ["is_month"]=> bool(false) ["is_day"]=> bool(false) ["is_time"]=> bool(false) ["is_author"]=> bool(false) ["is_category"]=> bool(true) ["is_tag"]=> bool(false) ["is_tax"]=> bool(false) ["is_search"]=> bool(false) ["is_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_comment_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_trackback"]=> bool(false) ["is_home"]=> bool(false) ["is_privacy_policy"]=> bool(false) ["is_404"]=> bool(false) ["is_embed"]=> bool(false) ["is_paged"]=> bool(false) ["is_admin"]=> bool(false) ["is_attachment"]=> bool(false) ["is_singular"]=> bool(false) ["is_robots"]=> bool(false) ["is_posts_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_post_type_archive"]=> bool(false) ["query_vars_hash":"WP_Query":private]=> string(32) "b239cec030b7b08e2301315b28070261" ["query_vars_changed":"WP_Query":private]=> bool(false) ["thumbnails_cached"]=> bool(false) ["stopwords":"WP_Query":private]=> NULL ["compat_fields":"WP_Query":private]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(15) "query_vars_hash" [1]=> string(18) "query_vars_changed" } ["compat_methods":"WP_Query":private]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(16) "init_query_flags" [1]=> string(15) "parse_tax_query" } ["comments_by_type"]=> array(4) { ["comment"]=> array(2) { [0]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1333 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "209637" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5454" ["comment_author"]=> string(10) "Dana Engel" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "danaengel0@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "108.74.161.38" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2020-06-07 17:20:21" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-07 21:20:21" ["comment_content"]=> string(61) "Good job! It made me wish I had the same contact in Berkeley." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(137) "Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; CPU iPhone OS 13_4_1 like Mac OS X) AppleWebKit/605.1.15 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/13.1 Mobile/15E148 Safari/604.1" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [1]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1291 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "209638" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5454" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Bronwyn Dunne" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "bronwyndunne@mac.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(34) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.91.160.255" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2020-06-07 23:00:10" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-08 03:00:10" ["comment_content"]=> string(224) "You make me feel so good about what's going on in Vermont. We know we have great farmers here but knowing you live in CA -a state that is famous for its large farms- makes me even happier. I wish Greg could distribute there!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(119) "Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_14_6) AppleWebKit/605.1.15 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/13.1.1 Safari/605.1.15" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } } ["trackback"]=> array(0) { } ["pingback"]=> array(0) { } ["pings"]=> array(0) { } } }
SUBSCRIBE TO THIS BLOG’S FEED

One response to “Digging the Dirt for a More Sustainable Future”

  1. Love it Laurie! Great article — looking forward to reading about Vermont farms — one farmer looks familiar!!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


Print Friendly, PDF & Email

 

Shop Local!

Curbside pickup – Creative Measures to Support Our Local Farmers

If there was ever a time to truly embrace our local farmers – it is NOW.

It seems that locally grown food and sourced products are more available than ever.  My journey of discovering how to access local bounty in these current times has introduced a new appreciation for the creativity and resiliency of our farming community.

Perusing the websites of several farms this week made me ravenous.  I found a multitude of options at farms all within a 15 minute drive from my home.  My task: select a farm, visit the menu of options and place my on-line order.  Our farmers and their crews have been working tirelessly to keep up with demand.   Engaging us first through their enticing websites, with displays of colorful photos of their available goods, there are clear, step by step instructions, that explain how to order, pay, and safely gather through curb side pick-up.  Some items do sell out, so best to have alternative selections in mind.

This week, I chose Philo Ridge Farm, located in Charlotte, which promised a beautiful drive and an opportunity to stretch my legs.  

All I had to do was visit the farm’s website, make my order and wait for a call to provide my payment information and pick up time.  Philo Ridge Farm’s website is stunning- a feast for your eyes alone. I placed my order on a Wednesday through their online order form, and on Thursday received a call with my pick -up options and made a phone payment.

On Friday, I arrived at noon, the sun was streaming through the clouds over the distant green mountains. I was the only car in the parking lot.  Greeted with a friendly hello, a young woman clad in a mask carefully handed me a brown bag, my name inscribed on the front.   Other carefully distanced bags scribed with names sat on the outside table- many with beautiful bouquets of fresh colorful flowers poking out.  Next time, I will be sure to include these in my order.

I glimpsed at some magnificent Belted Galloway cows, their tails happily swishing back in forth. I took in the endless pastures, bales of hay, the stately red barn, and freshly planted fields, appreciating all of it.

Once home, I took out each item from my bag -organic sweet potatoes from Laughing Child Farm, beets from Pitchfork Farm, clean baby taters from Pete’s Greens, Full Moon Farm parsnips, and kale and fresh lettuce mix from Philo Ridge Farm.   Homemade chicken broth, too!   One stop at this beautiful farm, close to home, and I had produce from multiple farms, topped off with a satisfying feeling that, in a small way, I had supported each of them.

As our family enjoyed meals this week, created from the fresh local bounty, we felt a deep sense of gratitude for all the individuals who worked incredibly hard to bring this healthy food to our tables.

Countless farms, including nearby Bread and Butter Farm in South Burlington, and Trillium Hill Farm in Hinesburg, are just a few of many in our beautiful state who offer locally grown and sourced goods.

Stay tuned as we visit our farmers all over the green mountain state as ITKWB begins our “Farmer Stories.”   As we celebrate our farmers, we look forward to sharing a more in depth look at their lives, their work, and the impact they collectively have on ours.

Posted: 5-2-2020

object(WP_Query)#375 (54) {
  ["query"]=>
  array(1) {
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
  }
  ["query_vars"]=>
  array(63) {
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["error"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["m"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["p"]=>
    int(0)
    ["post_parent"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["name"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["pagename"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["page_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["second"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["minute"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["hour"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["day"]=>
    int(0)
    ["monthnum"]=>
    int(0)
    ["year"]=>
    int(0)
    ["w"]=>
    int(0)
    ["tag"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["cat"]=>
    int(1)
    ["tag_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author_name"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["feed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["tb"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["paged"]=>
    int(0)
    ["meta_key"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["meta_value"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["preview"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["s"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["sentence"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["title"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["fields"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["menu_order"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["embed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["category__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_name__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["ignore_sticky_posts"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["suppress_filters"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["cache_results"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_term_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["lazy_load_term_meta"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_meta_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["post_type"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["posts_per_page"]=>
    int(5)
    ["nopaging"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["comments_per_page"]=>
    string(2) "50"
    ["no_found_rows"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["order"]=>
    string(4) "DESC"
  }
  ["tax_query"]=>
  object(WP_Tax_Query)#1121 (6) {
    ["queries"]=>
    array(1) {
      [0]=>
      array(5) {
        ["taxonomy"]=>
        string(8) "category"
        ["terms"]=>
        array(1) {
          [0]=>
          string(4) "blog"
        }
        ["field"]=>
        string(4) "slug"
        ["operator"]=>
        string(2) "IN"
        ["include_children"]=>
        bool(true)
      }
    }
    ["relation"]=>
    string(3) "AND"
    ["table_aliases":protected]=>
    array(1) {
      [0]=>
      string(21) "wp_term_relationships"
    }
    ["queried_terms"]=>
    array(1) {
      ["category"]=>
      array(2) {
        ["terms"]=>
        array(1) {
          [0]=>
          string(4) "blog"
        }
        ["field"]=>
        string(4) "slug"
      }
    }
    ["primary_table"]=>
    string(8) "wp_posts"
    ["primary_id_column"]=>
    string(2) "ID"
  }
  ["meta_query"]=>
  object(WP_Meta_Query)#1120 (9) {
    ["queries"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["relation"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["table_aliases":protected]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["clauses":protected]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["has_or_relation":protected]=>
    bool(false)
  }
  ["date_query"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["queried_object"]=>
  object(WP_Term)#1250 (16) {
    ["term_id"]=>
    int(1)
    ["name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["slug"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["term_group"]=>
    int(0)
    ["term_taxonomy_id"]=>
    int(1)
    ["taxonomy"]=>
    string(8) "category"
    ["description"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["parent"]=>
    int(0)
    ["count"]=>
    int(175)
    ["filter"]=>
    string(3) "raw"
    ["cat_ID"]=>
    int(1)
    ["category_count"]=>
    int(175)
    ["category_description"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["cat_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["category_nicename"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["category_parent"]=>
    int(0)
  }
  ["queried_object_id"]=>
  int(1)
  ["request"]=>
  string(341) "SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS  wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts  LEFT JOIN wp_term_relationships ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_term_relationships.object_id) WHERE 1=1  AND ( 
  wp_term_relationships.term_taxonomy_id IN (1)
) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post' AND (wp_posts.post_status = 'publish') GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 5"
  ["posts"]=>
  &array(5) {
    [0]=>
    object(WP_Post)#1126 (24) {
      ["ID"]=>
      int(5469)
      ["post_author"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_date"]=>
      string(19) "2020-06-28 07:01:20"
      ["post_date_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2020-06-28 11:01:20"
      ["post_content"]=>
      string(7218) "

A canopy of trees enveloping a narrow dirt road offers an unexpected adventure- a road that branches off on either side every couple hundred feet lacking signage inspires curiosity.  One needs a reason for venturing down to these fertile grounds on the edge of the Winooski river.  These places have some mystery attached.  Burlington’s Intervale offers a multitude of game changing initiatives including community supported agriculture, large scale composting, farm incubators and this year, an online Summervale festival.  It is a model for food and farming organizations throughout the world.  It is working to foster a local food economy that is good for people and the planet.

Reclaiming the Land

 

Any fork will take you to a collection of stunning fields growing everything from flowers to vegetables to herbs in soil that has a rich legacy dating back to the early settlers.  Land that was once farmed by Native Americans a millennium ago is now farmed by new farmers and a few seasoned ones- all who share a passion for farming the land, learning the business of farming, and marketing their bounty to a range of growing markets.

An Incubator for Young Farmers

Each has its own story and this land which has provided an incubator for small farms to medium farms on leased land from the Intervale.  And for many farmers who started here, and later moved on re-settling on their own land in other communities and thrived, there is a sense of gratitude for their early beginnings.

Diggers Mirth Collective Farm

 

Diggers Mirth, collectively owned and operated, is one of the eight farms that have found a home here, and is a perfect example of the farms that lease the land from the Intervale.  Diggers Mirth name was derived from a British Agrarian Collective that operated in the mid 1600’s.  This farm produces and sells vegetables, herbs and honey to the Burlington area. This season, like many other farmers, they have creatively found ways to get their organic bounty to customers through on-line ordering and pick up sites.  (www.diggersmirth.com)

A Rich History

This 700 acres of bottomland within the city limits of Burlington has not always shared the same vitality that it has today. In 1985, Will Raap, founder of Gardeners Supply, was a major force in the restoration of the Intervale land bringing it back to its agricultural roots.  A millennium ago, Native Americans farmed here. Since the 1700’s, a long history of agriculture productivity has existed here. Dairy farming in early 1900, joined by pig farming in 1950, and  vast acres of corn, and other vegetables graced this land for decades.  For twenty-five years until the 1970’s, it was the site of a large municipal dump, bringing the area into decline.   It was Raap’s vision with the help of others who cared about the land, and restored it back to its original roots to create the Intervale as it exists today.  Since 1988, it has reclaimed 350 acres of historical agricultural land and created countless opportunities for farms to thrive.

Summervale Festival goes On-line

 

Summervale, a popular summer community food and music festival will continue once again this year with lively fun music on Thursdays starting July 9th  from 6:30-8pm.  Under a creative virtual format you can enjoy local musicians like Mr. Chris and Friends and Pete’s Posse,  live on the Intervale’s  Facebook and Instagram pages.  Although the Summervale experience will be virtual this year, you can still walk the trails and enjoy the natural areas throughout the season.

Returned To Its Roots

Intervale Farms like Diggers Mirth thrive on this fertile riverbed, but the threat of flooding with the new reality of climate change presents a serious issue for the farmers who are working here.  Yet despite challenges, it remains a vital place that has returned to its roots and is prospering. Farmers who work these fields respect its rich and diverse history as stewards of the land.  It is a place that collectively provides our communities with local bounty that is grown on rich soil with hard work and love, a place that allows us all to envision food systems that support vibrant and thriving communities with a commitment to the power of good food.

Visit:  www.intervale.org  as there is so much more to learn!

In the Kitchen with Bronwyn wishes you a festive and happy Fourth of July as you enjoy your picnics and barbecues sharing good local food!

Thirty-four Vermont farms received a combined total of $73,000 through Vermont Land Trust’s (VTL) new program for farmers affected by COVID-19. For more information on future funding opportunities, contact Maggie Donin at maggie@vlt.org

" ["post_title"]=> string(39) "The Intervale - An Unexpected Adventure" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(361) "Burlington’s Intervale offers a multitude of game changing initiatives including community supported agriculture, large scale composting, farm incubators and this year, an online Summervale festival.  It is a model for food and farming organizations throughout the world.  It is working to foster a local food economy that is good for people and the planet." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(37) "the-intervale-an-unexpected-adventure" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-06-28 14:02:31" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-28 18:02:31" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5469" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "1" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#1124 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5454) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-06-06 06:13:29" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-06 10:13:29" ["post_content"]=> string(6766) "

Trying to find a silver lining in the middle of a pandemic is a lot to ask.    Our lives have been upended.   Gathering around our dinner tables with homecooked meals, sharing more family time than ever before feels comforting. With more time to spare we are thinking more about how and where our food is grown.

Greg Georgaklis, President and founder of Farmers to You

Unprecedented Demand

Farmers to You, an organization started ten years ago, has stepped up to meet an unprecedented demand for good, healthy, and safe food.  With streamlined systems in place, it quickly revved up to provide families in urban communities healthy locally sourced food.

Years before the pandemic, Greg Georgaklis, President and founder of Farmers to You offered me an opportunity to travel with him to Boston- their primary market.    I tagged along visiting various neighborhood delivery sites around the greater Boston area for a story I was writing.   Our first stop was a Waldorf School in Lexington, Massachusetts- timed perfectly when parents were picking up their children.  What struck me immediately was the sense of joy and excitement that radiated from customers who gathered as soon as the truck arrived to collect their bags of Vermont bounty.

Actually orgasmic

I recall one customer who noticed my pen in hand and asked, “Have you ever tried this yogurt? - it’s the best I’ve ever tasted- it’s actually orgasmic!”  Before I could even answer, she handed it to me, “Here, please take one of mine- you need to taste this.”   A stranger to me had offered up one of her prized items.   With a container of maple yogurt labeled Butterworks Farm in hand, she waited and watched me dip my spoon.  She was right.  Delightfully creamy, light, and intensely flavorful; to this day, I have never forgotten her kind gesture.

Ten years later

Now, ten years later, the food Farmers to You delivers to their customers has a similar effect- the only difference is now they offer over 300 products sourced from 100 farms and food purveyors.  Food harvested to order ensuring peak freshness is their daily mantra.

Recently, my husband and I devoured an intensely flavorful and tender steak that had been raised at Tilldale Farm.  Greg shared it had everything to do with the farmer’s well cared for Red Devon cattle, who were 100% grass fed.

Greg’s philosophy is clear and simple- if you build a healthy food system grown, in organic regenerative soil, and create a seamless distribution – you will nurture happy, satisfied customers. Exactly why Farmers to You has amassed 1,400 Boston-area customers, with 150 in Vermont, and a growing wait list.

That word is flavor

One word defines the difference between food often trucked 1,500 miles to our tables versus food grown in healthy soil within a 150- mile radius, delivered within days of harvest, and raised humanely.  “That word is flavor,” Greg shares.   “Once families notice the difference- they taste it- they want more of it - and they are willing to pay for it.  They rarely return to their old ways.”

Our biggest challenge

The lettuce, cherry tomatoes, and kale in our dinner salads was just picked from farmer’s fields.   And yes, it costs more but the benefits of “fresh off the farm” far outweigh the extra dollars allocated.  The biggest challenge for Greg and his dedicated team is keeping a consistent customer base that sticks with it- as farmers increase their yield they rely on a steady stream of buyers.

Healthy Farms, Healthy Families, Healthy Planet

Local food systems are flourishing.  If we can stick with it, embrace it, and recognize the health benefits for our bodies and our planet-this new way of sourcing our food will be life changing.   

  Visit:   www.farmerstoyou.com   

(Laurie Caswell Burke)

" ["post_title"]=> string(22) "Pandemic Silver Lining" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(261) "The pandemic has us gathering around our dinner tables with homecooked meals and sharing more family time than ever before. With more time to spare, we are also thinking more about how and where our food is grown. Eat and shop confidently with Farmers to You." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(22) "pandemic-silver-lining" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-06-06 06:13:33" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-06 10:13:33" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5454" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "2" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#1128 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5400) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-05-16 07:10:42" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-16 11:10:42" ["post_content"]=> string(5332) "

Doesn’t it feel like Mother Nature seems to be guiding us through the pandemic with subtle hints –the birds sing more sweetly, the signs of spring, the early- blooming daffodils and tulips always hopeful, seem even more so this year.  If we listen and observe this time of pause, it can offer each of us an unprecedented opportunity to deepen our appreciation for our precious natural resources- our connection to the land and respect for something that is larger than ourselves.

I’ve always celebrated our local farmers but in this time of isolation and reduced access to food sources, I’ve embraced the opportunity to navigate the farming world I live in.  Amidst all the COVID19 changes, our access to locally grown food close to home has remained constant and comforting.  Dedicated farmers have been working tirelessly to provide the produce, meat and dairy products we’ve grown used to. There’s been no lack of lettuce, spinach, arugula, kale, eggs, chicken, and grass-fed beef for our tables.  With “curbside pick-up” and online order forms, local farmers have instituted creative, safe ways for us to access food, as nimbly as the most sophisticated urban food source.  And many –working with neighboring farms-  have banded together to sell farm products on a single website, to help each other and to make our local shopping easier.

This is no easy task to create an abundant food source when national supplies are threatened.  But once again, Vermont shines as a leader in demonstrating that small farms and innovative farming offers an excellent solution to provide healthy food for our families.

In the weeks ahead, Bronwyn and I will delve into the stories of Vermont Farmers who provide us with an edible landscape close to home, we hope you will join us in our appreciation for how fortunate we are to have so many committed individuals who have chosen to work the land for us.  We live in a remarkable state and we know it.   As we wake up to the possibility of a new way of living our lives, let’s envision one that is more intentional, sustainable  -one that brings deeper meaning. 

Who knew there could be so many cleverly- named farms in our state? Someday Farm, Fairy Tale Farm, Last Resort Farm, Reap and Sow, Bread and Butter Farm -those along with others, Trillium Hill Farm and Jasper Hill that honor a place or family tradition.  And, behind each name, there is a story, a story of how they evolved, and how this choice of working the land with devotion and fortitude has made our state a mecca for small farm farming.

As Bronwyn and I continue to experience the wonders of local and organic, we are eager to share these stories and images of the farmers who are continually evolving the concept of farming in Vermont with crops never grown here before –rice, artichokes, micro-greens- and methods that are innovative, changing the image of the state from black and white cows and pails of maple sap to cheese caves and large composting facilities, state –of- the -art greenhouses and  high-end sorting machinery.

Join us in the coming months to read the stories of what we promise will be a cornucopia of deliciousness as we dig deeper into the land and the lives of our farmers. We hope you will enjoy the tapestry of stories and photos of the men and women we call “Heroes” and the beauty of farms willing to innovate for the life and health of our state and of our world.

Laurie Caswell Burke

Catch up with Bronwyn on Food52 in a memory of an iconic lunch with Judith Jones and Julia Clancy.

" ["post_title"]=> string(46) "Digging the Dirt for a More Sustainable Future" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(222) "Farmers have always been vital, but the recent national food supply challenges have shed a refreshed spotlight on the work of our local farmers. Each farm, and the people behind it, have a story. These are their stories." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(46) "digging-the-dirt-for-a-more-sustainable-future" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-05-25 05:40:25" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-25 09:40:25" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5400" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "1" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#1129 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5380) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-05-02 06:14:44" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-02 10:14:44" ["post_content"]=> string(5794) "

Curbside pickup - Creative Measures to Support Our Local Farmers

If there was ever a time to truly embrace our local farmers – it is NOW.

It seems that locally grown food and sourced products are more available than ever.  My journey of discovering how to access local bounty in these current times has introduced a new appreciation for the creativity and resiliency of our farming community.

Perusing the websites of several farms this week made me ravenous.  I found a multitude of options at farms all within a 15 minute drive from my home.  My task: select a farm, visit the menu of options and place my on-line order.  Our farmers and their crews have been working tirelessly to keep up with demand.   Engaging us first through their enticing websites, with displays of colorful photos of their available goods, there are clear, step by step instructions, that explain how to order, pay, and safely gather through curb side pick-up.  Some items do sell out, so best to have alternative selections in mind.

This week, I chose Philo Ridge Farm, located in Charlotte, which promised a beautiful drive and an opportunity to stretch my legs.  

All I had to do was visit the farm’s website, make my order and wait for a call to provide my payment information and pick up time.  Philo Ridge Farm’s website is stunning- a feast for your eyes alone. I placed my order on a Wednesday through their online order form, and on Thursday received a call with my pick -up options and made a phone payment.

On Friday, I arrived at noon, the sun was streaming through the clouds over the distant green mountains. I was the only car in the parking lot.  Greeted with a friendly hello, a young woman clad in a mask carefully handed me a brown bag, my name inscribed on the front.   Other carefully distanced bags scribed with names sat on the outside table- many with beautiful bouquets of fresh colorful flowers poking out.  Next time, I will be sure to include these in my order.

I glimpsed at some magnificent Belted Galloway cows, their tails happily swishing back in forth. I took in the endless pastures, bales of hay, the stately red barn, and freshly planted fields, appreciating all of it.

Once home, I took out each item from my bag -organic sweet potatoes from Laughing Child Farm, beets from Pitchfork Farm, clean baby taters from Pete’s Greens, Full Moon Farm parsnips, and kale and fresh lettuce mix from Philo Ridge Farm.   Homemade chicken broth, too!   One stop at this beautiful farm, close to home, and I had produce from multiple farms, topped off with a satisfying feeling that, in a small way, I had supported each of them.

As our family enjoyed meals this week, created from the fresh local bounty, we felt a deep sense of gratitude for all the individuals who worked incredibly hard to bring this healthy food to our tables.

Countless farms, including nearby Bread and Butter Farm in South Burlington, and Trillium Hill Farm in Hinesburg, are just a few of many in our beautiful state who offer locally grown and sourced goods.

Stay tuned as we visit our farmers all over the green mountain state as ITKWB begins our “Farmer Stories.”   As we celebrate our farmers, we look forward to sharing a more in depth look at their lives, their work, and the impact they collectively have on ours.

" ["post_title"]=> string(11) "Shop Local!" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(10) "shop-local" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-05-02 06:14:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-02 10:14:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5380" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#1246 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5373) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-04-25 15:04:05" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-25 19:04:05" ["post_content"]=> string(2699) "

The perfect Rhubarb Pie

Does it seem possible? We’re half-way through...! Here in Vermont, we’re mostly all in agreement with our governor’s decision to continue to stay home until May 16th. And what are we all doing during this period of confinement? We’re cooking! It’s been a bonanza of cooking creativity, an outpouring of sharing recipes and photos, a chorus of What’s for Dinner!

Everyone I know is sourcing and preparing meals with abandon. Many of us are buying from local farms. Quite a tribute to what I’ve always said is the most satisfying of all art forms. Not only do you have the fun of creating something others can enjoy, but as the chef, you get immediate satisfaction - the applause comes almost at once. Especially now, when the evening meal can be the highlight of a day in lockdown.

Here are some of the dozens of photos of dishes prepared by friends and family over the last month. They range from three friends making roast chicken and sharing –virtually- what to do with leftovers, to a birthday party celebrated by cousins in Vienna, to a pasta supper by a rising star of the conducting world riding it out in a Swiss chalet, to a dinner made by a real chef for his pregnant wife in Madison, Wisconsin….and everything in between. Tacos with chorizo sausage and mushrooms, corn chowder with frozen corn, local cream and homemade chicken stock; and for one cook, me, who has never made a perfect pie, the perfect rhubarb pie. I call it Quarantine Cuisine!

" ["post_title"]=> string(28) "Quarantine Cuisine - Part II" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(123) "Food always brings joy, but this is especially true now, as we live in a world of social isolation from the ones we love. " ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(26) "quarantine-cuisine-part-ii" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-25 15:04:09" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-25 19:04:09" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5373" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "4" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post_count"]=> int(5) ["current_post"]=> int(3) ["in_the_loop"]=> bool(true) ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#1129 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5380) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-05-02 06:14:44" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-02 10:14:44" ["post_content"]=> string(5794) "

Curbside pickup - Creative Measures to Support Our Local Farmers

If there was ever a time to truly embrace our local farmers – it is NOW.

It seems that locally grown food and sourced products are more available than ever.  My journey of discovering how to access local bounty in these current times has introduced a new appreciation for the creativity and resiliency of our farming community.

Perusing the websites of several farms this week made me ravenous.  I found a multitude of options at farms all within a 15 minute drive from my home.  My task: select a farm, visit the menu of options and place my on-line order.  Our farmers and their crews have been working tirelessly to keep up with demand.   Engaging us first through their enticing websites, with displays of colorful photos of their available goods, there are clear, step by step instructions, that explain how to order, pay, and safely gather through curb side pick-up.  Some items do sell out, so best to have alternative selections in mind.

This week, I chose Philo Ridge Farm, located in Charlotte, which promised a beautiful drive and an opportunity to stretch my legs.  

All I had to do was visit the farm’s website, make my order and wait for a call to provide my payment information and pick up time.  Philo Ridge Farm’s website is stunning- a feast for your eyes alone. I placed my order on a Wednesday through their online order form, and on Thursday received a call with my pick -up options and made a phone payment.

On Friday, I arrived at noon, the sun was streaming through the clouds over the distant green mountains. I was the only car in the parking lot.  Greeted with a friendly hello, a young woman clad in a mask carefully handed me a brown bag, my name inscribed on the front.   Other carefully distanced bags scribed with names sat on the outside table- many with beautiful bouquets of fresh colorful flowers poking out.  Next time, I will be sure to include these in my order.

I glimpsed at some magnificent Belted Galloway cows, their tails happily swishing back in forth. I took in the endless pastures, bales of hay, the stately red barn, and freshly planted fields, appreciating all of it.

Once home, I took out each item from my bag -organic sweet potatoes from Laughing Child Farm, beets from Pitchfork Farm, clean baby taters from Pete’s Greens, Full Moon Farm parsnips, and kale and fresh lettuce mix from Philo Ridge Farm.   Homemade chicken broth, too!   One stop at this beautiful farm, close to home, and I had produce from multiple farms, topped off with a satisfying feeling that, in a small way, I had supported each of them.

As our family enjoyed meals this week, created from the fresh local bounty, we felt a deep sense of gratitude for all the individuals who worked incredibly hard to bring this healthy food to our tables.

Countless farms, including nearby Bread and Butter Farm in South Burlington, and Trillium Hill Farm in Hinesburg, are just a few of many in our beautiful state who offer locally grown and sourced goods.

Stay tuned as we visit our farmers all over the green mountain state as ITKWB begins our “Farmer Stories.”   As we celebrate our farmers, we look forward to sharing a more in depth look at their lives, their work, and the impact they collectively have on ours.

" ["post_title"]=> string(11) "Shop Local!" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(10) "shop-local" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-05-02 06:14:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-02 10:14:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5380" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["comments"]=> array(1) { [0]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1272 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "209650" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5400" ["comment_author"]=> string(14) "Anne Schroeder" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(29) "annedarginschroeder@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(26) "http://www.andispeople.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "108.49.48.64" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2020-06-10 11:44:24" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-10 15:44:24" ["comment_content"]=> string(110) "Love it Laurie! Great article -- looking forward to reading about Vermont farms -- one farmer looks familiar!!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(117) "Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_15_4) AppleWebKit/605.1.15 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/13.1 Safari/605.1.15" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } } ["comment_count"]=> int(1) ["current_comment"]=> int(-1) ["found_posts"]=> string(3) "132" ["max_num_pages"]=> float(27) ["max_num_comment_pages"]=> int(0) ["is_single"]=> bool(false) ["is_preview"]=> bool(false) ["is_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_archive"]=> bool(true) ["is_date"]=> bool(false) ["is_year"]=> bool(false) ["is_month"]=> bool(false) ["is_day"]=> bool(false) ["is_time"]=> bool(false) ["is_author"]=> bool(false) ["is_category"]=> bool(true) ["is_tag"]=> bool(false) ["is_tax"]=> bool(false) ["is_search"]=> bool(false) ["is_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_comment_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_trackback"]=> bool(false) ["is_home"]=> bool(false) ["is_privacy_policy"]=> bool(false) ["is_404"]=> bool(false) ["is_embed"]=> bool(false) ["is_paged"]=> bool(false) ["is_admin"]=> bool(false) ["is_attachment"]=> bool(false) ["is_singular"]=> bool(false) ["is_robots"]=> bool(false) ["is_posts_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_post_type_archive"]=> bool(false) ["query_vars_hash":"WP_Query":private]=> string(32) "b239cec030b7b08e2301315b28070261" ["query_vars_changed":"WP_Query":private]=> bool(false) ["thumbnails_cached"]=> bool(false) ["stopwords":"WP_Query":private]=> NULL ["compat_fields":"WP_Query":private]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(15) "query_vars_hash" [1]=> string(18) "query_vars_changed" } ["compat_methods":"WP_Query":private]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(16) "init_query_flags" [1]=> string(15) "parse_tax_query" } ["comments_by_type"]=> array(4) { ["comment"]=> array(1) { [0]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1272 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "209650" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5400" ["comment_author"]=> string(14) "Anne Schroeder" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(29) "annedarginschroeder@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(26) "http://www.andispeople.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "108.49.48.64" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2020-06-10 11:44:24" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-10 15:44:24" ["comment_content"]=> string(110) "Love it Laurie! Great article -- looking forward to reading about Vermont farms -- one farmer looks familiar!!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(117) "Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_15_4) AppleWebKit/605.1.15 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/13.1 Safari/605.1.15" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } } ["trackback"]=> array(0) { } ["pingback"]=> array(0) { } ["pings"]=> array(0) { } } }
SUBSCRIBE TO THIS BLOG’S FEED

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


Print Friendly, PDF & Email

 

Quarantine Cuisine – Part II

The perfect Rhubarb Pie

Does it seem possible? We’re half-way through…! Here in Vermont, we’re mostly all in agreement with our governor’s decision to continue to stay home until May 16th. And what are we all doing during this period of confinement? We’re cooking! It’s been a bonanza of cooking creativity, an outpouring of sharing recipes and photos, a chorus of What’s for Dinner!

Everyone I know is sourcing and preparing meals with abandon. Many of us are buying from local farms. Quite a tribute to what I’ve always said is the most satisfying of all art forms. Not only do you have the fun of creating something others can enjoy, but as the chef, you get immediate satisfaction – the applause comes almost at once. Especially now, when the evening meal can be the highlight of a day in lockdown.

Here are some of the dozens of photos of dishes prepared by friends and family over the last month. They range from three friends making roast chicken and sharing –virtually- what to do with leftovers, to a birthday party celebrated by cousins in Vienna, to a pasta supper by a rising star of the conducting world riding it out in a Swiss chalet, to a dinner made by a real chef for his pregnant wife in Madison, Wisconsin….and everything in between. Tacos with chorizo sausage and mushrooms, corn chowder with frozen corn, local cream and homemade chicken stock; and for one cook, me, who has never made a perfect pie, the perfect rhubarb pie. I call it Quarantine Cuisine!

Posted: 4-25-2020

object(WP_Query)#375 (54) {
  ["query"]=>
  array(1) {
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
  }
  ["query_vars"]=>
  array(63) {
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["error"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["m"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["p"]=>
    int(0)
    ["post_parent"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["name"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["pagename"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["page_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["second"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["minute"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["hour"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["day"]=>
    int(0)
    ["monthnum"]=>
    int(0)
    ["year"]=>
    int(0)
    ["w"]=>
    int(0)
    ["tag"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["cat"]=>
    int(1)
    ["tag_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author_name"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["feed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["tb"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["paged"]=>
    int(0)
    ["meta_key"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["meta_value"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["preview"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["s"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["sentence"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["title"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["fields"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["menu_order"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["embed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["category__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_name__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["ignore_sticky_posts"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["suppress_filters"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["cache_results"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_term_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["lazy_load_term_meta"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_meta_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["post_type"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["posts_per_page"]=>
    int(5)
    ["nopaging"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["comments_per_page"]=>
    string(2) "50"
    ["no_found_rows"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["order"]=>
    string(4) "DESC"
  }
  ["tax_query"]=>
  object(WP_Tax_Query)#1121 (6) {
    ["queries"]=>
    array(1) {
      [0]=>
      array(5) {
        ["taxonomy"]=>
        string(8) "category"
        ["terms"]=>
        array(1) {
          [0]=>
          string(4) "blog"
        }
        ["field"]=>
        string(4) "slug"
        ["operator"]=>
        string(2) "IN"
        ["include_children"]=>
        bool(true)
      }
    }
    ["relation"]=>
    string(3) "AND"
    ["table_aliases":protected]=>
    array(1) {
      [0]=>
      string(21) "wp_term_relationships"
    }
    ["queried_terms"]=>
    array(1) {
      ["category"]=>
      array(2) {
        ["terms"]=>
        array(1) {
          [0]=>
          string(4) "blog"
        }
        ["field"]=>
        string(4) "slug"
      }
    }
    ["primary_table"]=>
    string(8) "wp_posts"
    ["primary_id_column"]=>
    string(2) "ID"
  }
  ["meta_query"]=>
  object(WP_Meta_Query)#1120 (9) {
    ["queries"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["relation"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["table_aliases":protected]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["clauses":protected]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["has_or_relation":protected]=>
    bool(false)
  }
  ["date_query"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["queried_object"]=>
  object(WP_Term)#1250 (16) {
    ["term_id"]=>
    int(1)
    ["name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["slug"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["term_group"]=>
    int(0)
    ["term_taxonomy_id"]=>
    int(1)
    ["taxonomy"]=>
    string(8) "category"
    ["description"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["parent"]=>
    int(0)
    ["count"]=>
    int(175)
    ["filter"]=>
    string(3) "raw"
    ["cat_ID"]=>
    int(1)
    ["category_count"]=>
    int(175)
    ["category_description"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["cat_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["category_nicename"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["category_parent"]=>
    int(0)
  }
  ["queried_object_id"]=>
  int(1)
  ["request"]=>
  string(341) "SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS  wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts  LEFT JOIN wp_term_relationships ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_term_relationships.object_id) WHERE 1=1  AND ( 
  wp_term_relationships.term_taxonomy_id IN (1)
) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post' AND (wp_posts.post_status = 'publish') GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 5"
  ["posts"]=>
  &array(5) {
    [0]=>
    object(WP_Post)#1126 (24) {
      ["ID"]=>
      int(5469)
      ["post_author"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_date"]=>
      string(19) "2020-06-28 07:01:20"
      ["post_date_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2020-06-28 11:01:20"
      ["post_content"]=>
      string(7218) "

A canopy of trees enveloping a narrow dirt road offers an unexpected adventure- a road that branches off on either side every couple hundred feet lacking signage inspires curiosity.  One needs a reason for venturing down to these fertile grounds on the edge of the Winooski river.  These places have some mystery attached.  Burlington’s Intervale offers a multitude of game changing initiatives including community supported agriculture, large scale composting, farm incubators and this year, an online Summervale festival.  It is a model for food and farming organizations throughout the world.  It is working to foster a local food economy that is good for people and the planet.

Reclaiming the Land

 

Any fork will take you to a collection of stunning fields growing everything from flowers to vegetables to herbs in soil that has a rich legacy dating back to the early settlers.  Land that was once farmed by Native Americans a millennium ago is now farmed by new farmers and a few seasoned ones- all who share a passion for farming the land, learning the business of farming, and marketing their bounty to a range of growing markets.

An Incubator for Young Farmers

Each has its own story and this land which has provided an incubator for small farms to medium farms on leased land from the Intervale.  And for many farmers who started here, and later moved on re-settling on their own land in other communities and thrived, there is a sense of gratitude for their early beginnings.

Diggers Mirth Collective Farm

 

Diggers Mirth, collectively owned and operated, is one of the eight farms that have found a home here, and is a perfect example of the farms that lease the land from the Intervale.  Diggers Mirth name was derived from a British Agrarian Collective that operated in the mid 1600’s.  This farm produces and sells vegetables, herbs and honey to the Burlington area. This season, like many other farmers, they have creatively found ways to get their organic bounty to customers through on-line ordering and pick up sites.  (www.diggersmirth.com)

A Rich History

This 700 acres of bottomland within the city limits of Burlington has not always shared the same vitality that it has today. In 1985, Will Raap, founder of Gardeners Supply, was a major force in the restoration of the Intervale land bringing it back to its agricultural roots.  A millennium ago, Native Americans farmed here. Since the 1700’s, a long history of agriculture productivity has existed here. Dairy farming in early 1900, joined by pig farming in 1950, and  vast acres of corn, and other vegetables graced this land for decades.  For twenty-five years until the 1970’s, it was the site of a large municipal dump, bringing the area into decline.   It was Raap’s vision with the help of others who cared about the land, and restored it back to its original roots to create the Intervale as it exists today.  Since 1988, it has reclaimed 350 acres of historical agricultural land and created countless opportunities for farms to thrive.

Summervale Festival goes On-line

 

Summervale, a popular summer community food and music festival will continue once again this year with lively fun music on Thursdays starting July 9th  from 6:30-8pm.  Under a creative virtual format you can enjoy local musicians like Mr. Chris and Friends and Pete’s Posse,  live on the Intervale’s  Facebook and Instagram pages.  Although the Summervale experience will be virtual this year, you can still walk the trails and enjoy the natural areas throughout the season.

Returned To Its Roots

Intervale Farms like Diggers Mirth thrive on this fertile riverbed, but the threat of flooding with the new reality of climate change presents a serious issue for the farmers who are working here.  Yet despite challenges, it remains a vital place that has returned to its roots and is prospering. Farmers who work these fields respect its rich and diverse history as stewards of the land.  It is a place that collectively provides our communities with local bounty that is grown on rich soil with hard work and love, a place that allows us all to envision food systems that support vibrant and thriving communities with a commitment to the power of good food.

Visit:  www.intervale.org  as there is so much more to learn!

In the Kitchen with Bronwyn wishes you a festive and happy Fourth of July as you enjoy your picnics and barbecues sharing good local food!

Thirty-four Vermont farms received a combined total of $73,000 through Vermont Land Trust’s (VTL) new program for farmers affected by COVID-19. For more information on future funding opportunities, contact Maggie Donin at maggie@vlt.org

" ["post_title"]=> string(39) "The Intervale - An Unexpected Adventure" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(361) "Burlington’s Intervale offers a multitude of game changing initiatives including community supported agriculture, large scale composting, farm incubators and this year, an online Summervale festival.  It is a model for food and farming organizations throughout the world.  It is working to foster a local food economy that is good for people and the planet." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(37) "the-intervale-an-unexpected-adventure" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-06-28 14:02:31" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-28 18:02:31" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5469" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "1" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#1124 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5454) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-06-06 06:13:29" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-06 10:13:29" ["post_content"]=> string(6766) "

Trying to find a silver lining in the middle of a pandemic is a lot to ask.    Our lives have been upended.   Gathering around our dinner tables with homecooked meals, sharing more family time than ever before feels comforting. With more time to spare we are thinking more about how and where our food is grown.

Greg Georgaklis, President and founder of Farmers to You

Unprecedented Demand

Farmers to You, an organization started ten years ago, has stepped up to meet an unprecedented demand for good, healthy, and safe food.  With streamlined systems in place, it quickly revved up to provide families in urban communities healthy locally sourced food.

Years before the pandemic, Greg Georgaklis, President and founder of Farmers to You offered me an opportunity to travel with him to Boston- their primary market.    I tagged along visiting various neighborhood delivery sites around the greater Boston area for a story I was writing.   Our first stop was a Waldorf School in Lexington, Massachusetts- timed perfectly when parents were picking up their children.  What struck me immediately was the sense of joy and excitement that radiated from customers who gathered as soon as the truck arrived to collect their bags of Vermont bounty.

Actually orgasmic

I recall one customer who noticed my pen in hand and asked, “Have you ever tried this yogurt? - it’s the best I’ve ever tasted- it’s actually orgasmic!”  Before I could even answer, she handed it to me, “Here, please take one of mine- you need to taste this.”   A stranger to me had offered up one of her prized items.   With a container of maple yogurt labeled Butterworks Farm in hand, she waited and watched me dip my spoon.  She was right.  Delightfully creamy, light, and intensely flavorful; to this day, I have never forgotten her kind gesture.

Ten years later

Now, ten years later, the food Farmers to You delivers to their customers has a similar effect- the only difference is now they offer over 300 products sourced from 100 farms and food purveyors.  Food harvested to order ensuring peak freshness is their daily mantra.

Recently, my husband and I devoured an intensely flavorful and tender steak that had been raised at Tilldale Farm.  Greg shared it had everything to do with the farmer’s well cared for Red Devon cattle, who were 100% grass fed.

Greg’s philosophy is clear and simple- if you build a healthy food system grown, in organic regenerative soil, and create a seamless distribution – you will nurture happy, satisfied customers. Exactly why Farmers to You has amassed 1,400 Boston-area customers, with 150 in Vermont, and a growing wait list.

That word is flavor

One word defines the difference between food often trucked 1,500 miles to our tables versus food grown in healthy soil within a 150- mile radius, delivered within days of harvest, and raised humanely.  “That word is flavor,” Greg shares.   “Once families notice the difference- they taste it- they want more of it - and they are willing to pay for it.  They rarely return to their old ways.”

Our biggest challenge

The lettuce, cherry tomatoes, and kale in our dinner salads was just picked from farmer’s fields.   And yes, it costs more but the benefits of “fresh off the farm” far outweigh the extra dollars allocated.  The biggest challenge for Greg and his dedicated team is keeping a consistent customer base that sticks with it- as farmers increase their yield they rely on a steady stream of buyers.

Healthy Farms, Healthy Families, Healthy Planet

Local food systems are flourishing.  If we can stick with it, embrace it, and recognize the health benefits for our bodies and our planet-this new way of sourcing our food will be life changing.   

  Visit:   www.farmerstoyou.com   

(Laurie Caswell Burke)

" ["post_title"]=> string(22) "Pandemic Silver Lining" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(261) "The pandemic has us gathering around our dinner tables with homecooked meals and sharing more family time than ever before. With more time to spare, we are also thinking more about how and where our food is grown. Eat and shop confidently with Farmers to You." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(22) "pandemic-silver-lining" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-06-06 06:13:33" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-06-06 10:13:33" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5454" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "2" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#1128 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5400) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-05-16 07:10:42" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-16 11:10:42" ["post_content"]=> string(5332) "

Doesn’t it feel like Mother Nature seems to be guiding us through the pandemic with subtle hints –the birds sing more sweetly, the signs of spring, the early- blooming daffodils and tulips always hopeful, seem even more so this year.  If we listen and observe this time of pause, it can offer each of us an unprecedented opportunity to deepen our appreciation for our precious natural resources- our connection to the land and respect for something that is larger than ourselves.

I’ve always celebrated our local farmers but in this time of isolation and reduced access to food sources, I’ve embraced the opportunity to navigate the farming world I live in.  Amidst all the COVID19 changes, our access to locally grown food close to home has remained constant and comforting.  Dedicated farmers have been working tirelessly to provide the produce, meat and dairy products we’ve grown used to. There’s been no lack of lettuce, spinach, arugula, kale, eggs, chicken, and grass-fed beef for our tables.  With “curbside pick-up” and online order forms, local farmers have instituted creative, safe ways for us to access food, as nimbly as the most sophisticated urban food source.  And many –working with neighboring farms-  have banded together to sell farm products on a single website, to help each other and to make our local shopping easier.

This is no easy task to create an abundant food source when national supplies are threatened.  But once again, Vermont shines as a leader in demonstrating that small farms and innovative farming offers an excellent solution to provide healthy food for our families.

In the weeks ahead, Bronwyn and I will delve into the stories of Vermont Farmers who provide us with an edible landscape close to home, we hope you will join us in our appreciation for how fortunate we are to have so many committed individuals who have chosen to work the land for us.  We live in a remarkable state and we know it.   As we wake up to the possibility of a new way of living our lives, let’s envision one that is more intentional, sustainable  -one that brings deeper meaning. 

Who knew there could be so many cleverly- named farms in our state? Someday Farm, Fairy Tale Farm, Last Resort Farm, Reap and Sow, Bread and Butter Farm -those along with others, Trillium Hill Farm and Jasper Hill that honor a place or family tradition.  And, behind each name, there is a story, a story of how they evolved, and how this choice of working the land with devotion and fortitude has made our state a mecca for small farm farming.

As Bronwyn and I continue to experience the wonders of local and organic, we are eager to share these stories and images of the farmers who are continually evolving the concept of farming in Vermont with crops never grown here before –rice, artichokes, micro-greens- and methods that are innovative, changing the image of the state from black and white cows and pails of maple sap to cheese caves and large composting facilities, state –of- the -art greenhouses and  high-end sorting machinery.

Join us in the coming months to read the stories of what we promise will be a cornucopia of deliciousness as we dig deeper into the land and the lives of our farmers. We hope you will enjoy the tapestry of stories and photos of the men and women we call “Heroes” and the beauty of farms willing to innovate for the life and health of our state and of our world.

Laurie Caswell Burke

Catch up with Bronwyn on Food52 in a memory of an iconic lunch with Judith Jones and Julia Clancy.

" ["post_title"]=> string(46) "Digging the Dirt for a More Sustainable Future" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(222) "Farmers have always been vital, but the recent national food supply challenges have shed a refreshed spotlight on the work of our local farmers. Each farm, and the people behind it, have a story. These are their stories." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(46) "digging-the-dirt-for-a-more-sustainable-future" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-05-25 05:40:25" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-25 09:40:25" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5400" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "1" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#1129 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5380) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-05-02 06:14:44" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-02 10:14:44" ["post_content"]=> string(5794) "

Curbside pickup - Creative Measures to Support Our Local Farmers

If there was ever a time to truly embrace our local farmers – it is NOW.

It seems that locally grown food and sourced products are more available than ever.  My journey of discovering how to access local bounty in these current times has introduced a new appreciation for the creativity and resiliency of our farming community.

Perusing the websites of several farms this week made me ravenous.  I found a multitude of options at farms all within a 15 minute drive from my home.  My task: select a farm, visit the menu of options and place my on-line order.  Our farmers and their crews have been working tirelessly to keep up with demand.   Engaging us first through their enticing websites, with displays of colorful photos of their available goods, there are clear, step by step instructions, that explain how to order, pay, and safely gather through curb side pick-up.  Some items do sell out, so best to have alternative selections in mind.

This week, I chose Philo Ridge Farm, located in Charlotte, which promised a beautiful drive and an opportunity to stretch my legs.  

All I had to do was visit the farm’s website, make my order and wait for a call to provide my payment information and pick up time.  Philo Ridge Farm’s website is stunning- a feast for your eyes alone. I placed my order on a Wednesday through their online order form, and on Thursday received a call with my pick -up options and made a phone payment.

On Friday, I arrived at noon, the sun was streaming through the clouds over the distant green mountains. I was the only car in the parking lot.  Greeted with a friendly hello, a young woman clad in a mask carefully handed me a brown bag, my name inscribed on the front.   Other carefully distanced bags scribed with names sat on the outside table- many with beautiful bouquets of fresh colorful flowers poking out.  Next time, I will be sure to include these in my order.

I glimpsed at some magnificent Belted Galloway cows, their tails happily swishing back in forth. I took in the endless pastures, bales of hay, the stately red barn, and freshly planted fields, appreciating all of it.

Once home, I took out each item from my bag -organic sweet potatoes from Laughing Child Farm, beets from Pitchfork Farm, clean baby taters from Pete’s Greens, Full Moon Farm parsnips, and kale and fresh lettuce mix from Philo Ridge Farm.   Homemade chicken broth, too!   One stop at this beautiful farm, close to home, and I had produce from multiple farms, topped off with a satisfying feeling that, in a small way, I had supported each of them.

As our family enjoyed meals this week, created from the fresh local bounty, we felt a deep sense of gratitude for all the individuals who worked incredibly hard to bring this healthy food to our tables.

Countless farms, including nearby Bread and Butter Farm in South Burlington, and Trillium Hill Farm in Hinesburg, are just a few of many in our beautiful state who offer locally grown and sourced goods.

Stay tuned as we visit our farmers all over the green mountain state as ITKWB begins our “Farmer Stories.”   As we celebrate our farmers, we look forward to sharing a more in depth look at their lives, their work, and the impact they collectively have on ours.

" ["post_title"]=> string(11) "Shop Local!" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(10) "shop-local" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-05-02 06:14:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-02 10:14:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5380" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#1246 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5373) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-04-25 15:04:05" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-25 19:04:05" ["post_content"]=> string(2699) "

The perfect Rhubarb Pie

Does it seem possible? We’re half-way through...! Here in Vermont, we’re mostly all in agreement with our governor’s decision to continue to stay home until May 16th. And what are we all doing during this period of confinement? We’re cooking! It’s been a bonanza of cooking creativity, an outpouring of sharing recipes and photos, a chorus of What’s for Dinner!

Everyone I know is sourcing and preparing meals with abandon. Many of us are buying from local farms. Quite a tribute to what I’ve always said is the most satisfying of all art forms. Not only do you have the fun of creating something others can enjoy, but as the chef, you get immediate satisfaction - the applause comes almost at once. Especially now, when the evening meal can be the highlight of a day in lockdown.

Here are some of the dozens of photos of dishes prepared by friends and family over the last month. They range from three friends making roast chicken and sharing –virtually- what to do with leftovers, to a birthday party celebrated by cousins in Vienna, to a pasta supper by a rising star of the conducting world riding it out in a Swiss chalet, to a dinner made by a real chef for his pregnant wife in Madison, Wisconsin….and everything in between. Tacos with chorizo sausage and mushrooms, corn chowder with frozen corn, local cream and homemade chicken stock; and for one cook, me, who has never made a perfect pie, the perfect rhubarb pie. I call it Quarantine Cuisine!

" ["post_title"]=> string(28) "Quarantine Cuisine - Part II" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(123) "Food always brings joy, but this is especially true now, as we live in a world of social isolation from the ones we love. " ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(26) "quarantine-cuisine-part-ii" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-25 15:04:09" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-25 19:04:09" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5373" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "4" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post_count"]=> int(5) ["current_post"]=> int(4) ["in_the_loop"]=> bool(true) ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#1246 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5373) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-04-25 15:04:05" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-25 19:04:05" ["post_content"]=> string(2699) "

The perfect Rhubarb Pie

Does it seem possible? We’re half-way through...! Here in Vermont, we’re mostly all in agreement with our governor’s decision to continue to stay home until May 16th. And what are we all doing during this period of confinement? We’re cooking! It’s been a bonanza of cooking creativity, an outpouring of sharing recipes and photos, a chorus of What’s for Dinner!

Everyone I know is sourcing and preparing meals with abandon. Many of us are buying from local farms. Quite a tribute to what I’ve always said is the most satisfying of all art forms. Not only do you have the fun of creating something others can enjoy, but as the chef, you get immediate satisfaction - the applause comes almost at once. Especially now, when the evening meal can be the highlight of a day in lockdown.

Here are some of the dozens of photos of dishes prepared by friends and family over the last month. They range from three friends making roast chicken and sharing –virtually- what to do with leftovers, to a birthday party celebrated by cousins in Vienna, to a pasta supper by a rising star of the conducting world riding it out in a Swiss chalet, to a dinner made by a real chef for his pregnant wife in Madison, Wisconsin….and everything in between. Tacos with chorizo sausage and mushrooms, corn chowder with frozen corn, local cream and homemade chicken stock; and for one cook, me, who has never made a perfect pie, the perfect rhubarb pie. I call it Quarantine Cuisine!

" ["post_title"]=> string(28) "Quarantine Cuisine - Part II" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(123) "Food always brings joy, but this is especially true now, as we live in a world of social isolation from the ones we love. " ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(26) "quarantine-cuisine-part-ii" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-25 15:04:09" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-25 19:04:09" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5373" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "4" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["comments"]=> array(0) { } ["comment_count"]=> int(0) ["current_comment"]=> int(-1) ["found_posts"]=> string(3) "132" ["max_num_pages"]=> float(27) ["max_num_comment_pages"]=> int(0) ["is_single"]=> bool(false) ["is_preview"]=> bool(false) ["is_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_archive"]=> bool(true) ["is_date"]=> bool(false) ["is_year"]=> bool(false) ["is_month"]=> bool(false) ["is_day"]=> bool(false) ["is_time"]=> bool(false) ["is_author"]=> bool(false) ["is_category"]=> bool(true) ["is_tag"]=> bool(false) ["is_tax"]=> bool(false) ["is_search"]=> bool(false) ["is_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_comment_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_trackback"]=> bool(false) ["is_home"]=> bool(false) ["is_privacy_policy"]=> bool(false) ["is_404"]=> bool(false) ["is_embed"]=> bool(false) ["is_paged"]=> bool(false) ["is_admin"]=> bool(false) ["is_attachment"]=> bool(false) ["is_singular"]=> bool(false) ["is_robots"]=> bool(false) ["is_posts_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_post_type_archive"]=> bool(false) ["query_vars_hash":"WP_Query":private]=> string(32) "b239cec030b7b08e2301315b28070261" ["query_vars_changed":"WP_Query":private]=> bool(false) ["thumbnails_cached"]=> bool(false) ["stopwords":"WP_Query":private]=> NULL ["compat_fields":"WP_Query":private]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(15) "query_vars_hash" [1]=> string(18) "query_vars_changed" } ["compat_methods":"WP_Query":private]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(16) "init_query_flags" [1]=> string(15) "parse_tax_query" } ["comments_by_type"]=> array(4) { ["comment"]=> array(0) { } ["trackback"]=> array(0) { } ["pingback"]=> array(0) { } ["pings"]=> array(0) { } } }
SUBSCRIBE TO THIS BLOG’S FEED

4 responses to “Quarantine Cuisine – Part II”

  1. Laurie says:

    Wonderful engaging post Bronwyn which will make everyone head to their kitchens to prepare their next meal. And as a fortunate recipient of a piece of this pie, it was scrumptious and honestly one of the best I have ever tasted. My husband Tim gave it his highest marks too! Keep baking!

  2. Dana Engel says:

    As the person who willed you the frozen rhubarb when I left VT and moved to CA, I feel I deserved a piece of that pie, even if it had only been a virtual opportunity to observe you wolfing it down. How brave of you to have made a pie crust during a time when you might not have wanted to chance a culinary disaster.

  3. You did deserve a piece, dear Dana, but where were you? Basking in the California sun, you lucky duck! I can promise you, you missed something good! I found the frozen rhubarb perfect for the pie. You par-boiled the rhubarb for how many minutes before cooling and freezing?I want to do this when rhubarb is available for next year’s pie. Many thanks for your gift!

  4. Jennifer Francoeur says:

    Oh my, that’s one gorgeous pie full of sweet, tart, butterflake perfection. Your mastered it, Bronwyn. Viva la cuisine de la quarantaine!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


Print Friendly, PDF & Email

 

TASTY PICKS

Good Food & Noteworthy Businesses

Hardwick Beef Ad #2

 


a La Carte Videos

Bronwyn Dunne and Judith Jones Prepare Two Potato Salads at Bryn Teg. See the recipes


Gateau de Crepes- In Molly’s Kitchen.
See recipe from the Smitten Kitchen



Blog Archives

Recipe Archives

  • Three New Must-Haves For Your Spice Cabinet - Jul 2019
  • Unagi – Preparation and Serving Suggestions - Jun 2019
  • Go Bananas at Burlington Farmer’s Market - May 2019
  • Gluten Free Banana Oatmeal Pancakes - May 2019
  • A Love Affair with Fermented Fare - Mar 2019
  • Strong Hands + Patience: Recipes for Home Fermenting - Jan 2019
  • Muffins posing as cupcakes - Dec 2018
  • ‘Tis the Season - Dec 2018
  • Four Things I learned in Cooking Class - Oct 2018
  • Moussaka - Oct 2018
  • I Love Early Fall…From My Head…To-ma-toes - Sep 2018
  • Three uses for a bounty of apples - Aug 2018
  • Strawberry Rhubarb Salsa - Jul 2018
  • Egg White Casserole with Sweet Potato Crust - Apr 2018
  • Chicken Dijonaise – Slow Cooker: The Best Cookbook Ever - Feb 2018
  • Winter Root Soup – Nourishing Traditions - Feb 2018
  • Soooo Many Momos - Sep 2017
  • Sautéed Fiddleheads in Butter with Lemon and Garlic - May 2017
  • A Recipe for the Holidays from Shelburne Farms - Nov 2013
  • The “Zetterburger” Recipe - Aug 2013
  • Homemade Fresh Mozzarella Recipe - Jul 2013
  • Twin Farms’ Gluten-Free Soufflé Pancake Recipe - Jun 2013
  • Potato Salad Two Ways - Mar 2013
  • It’s Easy Being Green—If You’re a Soup! - Feb 2013
  • For The Love of Valentine’s Day, A Chocolate Mousse - Feb 2013
  • Happy New Year Resolutions – Roasted Root Vegetables - Jan 2013
  • The Best Cheesecake in the World - Dec 2012
  • Tarte aux Pommes – A Holiday Gift to You - Dec 2012
  • A Thanksgiving Memory with a Memorable Brining Recipe - Nov 2012
  • Chicken with Artichokes & Honey – The Recipe - Nov 2012
  • Alison Baker’s Tomato Coconut Soup - Oct 2012
  • Basil, Lettuce and Tomato Sandwich – The Recipe - Oct 2012
  • Cold Pea Soup- The Recipe - Sep 2012
  • Onion Tart with Anchovies & Black Olives- Recipe for Pissaladiere Nicoise - Sep 2012
  • Boeuf Bourguignon - Apr 2012
  • Gingery Shrimp with Asparagus and Edamame - Apr 2012
  • Salisbury Steak - Apr 2012