A culinary online center dedicated to promoting the importance and the joy of American home cooking with an emphasis on local products and talent, celebrating the unique spirit and energy of the new food world ethos, especially in Vermont.

amuse bouche

I love quotes that add meaning to my life. Here are a few to live by:

Approach love and cooking with reckless abandon.
—The Dalai Lama

Rhubarb is a metaphor for finding happiness in your own backyard.
—Garrison Keillor

Buy your snacks from a farmers’ market.
—Michael Pollan

Even when he had a garden in Paris, Thomas Jefferson cultivated Indian corn, “to eat green in our manner, …as quickly after it left the stalk as possible.
—Evan Jones, from American Food

Love food? Love Farmers!

“Favorite Cookbook Contest” from the last blog post. And the winner is…Kelly Austin!

As I approached the last day of the farm stand that had become a frequent “go to” all summer and autumn I was at a loss. I had been seeing the bright yellow signs on the roadside that said November 24 –LAST DAY, but I was in denial. Common Roots, (www.commonroots.org) a farm stand and CSA, located off Spear Street at the intersection of Allen Road in South Burlington had become part of my weekly ritual. Where would I buy my vegetables, eggs, garlic, fresh local meat…? I also believed strongly in their mission which supports local food systems and provides food security for families and schools by fostering the relationships among farmers, educators, and the wider community.

The Friday before the pending closure for the season, my dear friend, Janet who lives in Boston made a surprise to visit to my house. I shared my disappointment with her. Her response.
“Let’s go together tomorrow and we’ll make it fun!” So off we went to Common Roots- a mile from my home to a place where farmers grow fresh organic produce in surrounding fields and also source eggs, cheese, Kombucha, meats, pickled green beans and more. It was chilly inside the charming little farm shop and there wasn’t much left on the shelves. Brown paper bags filled with Thanksgiving shares for CSA members were crowded together on a center table, waiting to be picked up. We grabbed our canvas bags and managed to fill them to the brim, as I explained to Janet that all summer and fall these shelves had been brimming local food from the fields. As we left, she patted me on the back with a you’ll be fine. Spring will return soon enough. HA! And doesn’t Vermont have Winter Farmers markets?

I imagine that many of you have felt similar feelings putting gardens to bed, bidding farewell to local farm stands and the local Farmers Markets. We have been so use to abundant locally grown food through – out the summer and autumn months, however the transition to late fall and winter isn’t always easy.

Fortunate for Vermonters there are over 18 Farmers Markets scattered around our state that offer abundant opportunities to find food, fun and much more. As December rolled in I suggested to Bronwyn that we visit our local Burlington Farmers market at the UVM Davis Center with anticipation of finding some good produce, and some ideas for holiday shopping. We found so much more. First, the parking was FREE!

And as we descended the stairs to the atrium level of the Davis Center, there was lively music playing and a wonderful array of tables filled to the brim with vegetables, cheese, coffee, hot chocolate, artisan crafts and more. Folks were having convivial conversations. This was clearly a happening place that I immediately knew I would be visiting all winter long.

We did a first blush walk through and on our second go I think we had almost parted with our money at every booth and had some special conversations with the vendors. We left with Orb Weaver Cheese, Specialty mushrooms, squash, the most beautiful eggs, kale, beets, soft cows cheese and an adorable hand carved ornament. It was so much fun. And to top it all off we shared the most delicious hot chocolate on the planet from a talented local chocolate maker.

What I found interesting was the stories these farmers and vendors shared with us. The scrumptious food and beautiful creative artisan goods reflected a sincere passion for their work. Their positive energy was contagious.

The Burlington Farmers market will run every Saturday between now and Christmas from 10am-2pm, and then once a month through April. If you live in Vermont, you can locate a Farmers Market near you by visiting -www.nofavt.org/vtfarmersmarkets or call 802-434-4122. And my sense is that wherever you live – there are options near you!

We can all continue to enjoy seasonal local food thanks to our hard -working farmers!

Last Blog’s Cookbook contest was such fun and our very first entrant, Kelly Austin, was the winner- her favorite cookbook…. Half Baked Harvest by Tieghan Gerard. Sweet little Mabon got in on the fun and picked our winner! Congratulations Kelly and enjoy your prize, Cooking for One, by Judith Jones- a treasure of a cookbook! Thank you to everyone who shared their favorites with us!

Posted: 12-15-2019

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“Favorite Cookbook Contest” from the last blog post. And the winner is…Kelly Austin!

As I approached the last day of the farm stand that had become a frequent “go to” all summer and autumn I was at a loss. I had been seeing the bright yellow signs on the roadside that said November 24 –LAST DAY, but I was in denial. Common Roots, (www.commonroots.org) a farm stand and CSA, located off Spear Street at the intersection of Allen Road in South Burlington had become part of my weekly ritual. Where would I buy my vegetables, eggs, garlic, fresh local meat…? I also believed strongly in their mission which supports local food systems and provides food security for families and schools by fostering the relationships among farmers, educators, and the wider community.

The Friday before the pending closure for the season, my dear friend, Janet who lives in Boston made a surprise to visit to my house. I shared my disappointment with her. Her response.
“Let’s go together tomorrow and we’ll make it fun!” So off we went to Common Roots- a mile from my home to a place where farmers grow fresh organic produce in surrounding fields and also source eggs, cheese, Kombucha, meats, pickled green beans and more. It was chilly inside the charming little farm shop and there wasn’t much left on the shelves. Brown paper bags filled with Thanksgiving shares for CSA members were crowded together on a center table, waiting to be picked up. We grabbed our canvas bags and managed to fill them to the brim, as I explained to Janet that all summer and fall these shelves had been brimming local food from the fields. As we left, she patted me on the back with a you’ll be fine. Spring will return soon enough. HA! And doesn’t Vermont have Winter Farmers markets?

I imagine that many of you have felt similar feelings putting gardens to bed, bidding farewell to local farm stands and the local Farmers Markets. We have been so use to abundant locally grown food through - out the summer and autumn months, however the transition to late fall and winter isn’t always easy.

Fortunate for Vermonters there are over 18 Farmers Markets scattered around our state that offer abundant opportunities to find food, fun and much more. As December rolled in I suggested to Bronwyn that we visit our local Burlington Farmers market at the UVM Davis Center with anticipation of finding some good produce, and some ideas for holiday shopping. We found so much more. First, the parking was FREE!

And as we descended the stairs to the atrium level of the Davis Center, there was lively music playing and a wonderful array of tables filled to the brim with vegetables, cheese, coffee, hot chocolate, artisan crafts and more. Folks were having convivial conversations. This was clearly a happening place that I immediately knew I would be visiting all winter long.

We did a first blush walk through and on our second go I think we had almost parted with our money at every booth and had some special conversations with the vendors. We left with Orb Weaver Cheese, Specialty mushrooms, squash, the most beautiful eggs, kale, beets, soft cows cheese and an adorable hand carved ornament. It was so much fun. And to top it all off we shared the most delicious hot chocolate on the planet from a talented local chocolate maker.

What I found interesting was the stories these farmers and vendors shared with us. The scrumptious food and beautiful creative artisan goods reflected a sincere passion for their work. Their positive energy was contagious.

The Burlington Farmers market will run every Saturday between now and Christmas from 10am-2pm, and then once a month through April. If you live in Vermont, you can locate a Farmers Market near you by visiting -www.nofavt.org/vtfarmersmarkets or call 802-434-4122. And my sense is that wherever you live – there are options near you!

We can all continue to enjoy seasonal local food thanks to our hard -working farmers!

Last Blog’s Cookbook contest was such fun and our very first entrant, Kelly Austin, was the winner- her favorite cookbook…. Half Baked Harvest by Tieghan Gerard. Sweet little Mabon got in on the fun and picked our winner! Congratulations Kelly and enjoy your prize, Cooking for One, by Judith Jones- a treasure of a cookbook! Thank you to everyone who shared their favorites with us!

" ["post_title"]=> string(24) "Love food? Love Farmers!" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(22) "love-food-love-farmers" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-12-15 17:46:04" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-15 21:46:04" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5278" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#1124 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5229) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-18 18:58:50" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-18 22:58:50" ["post_content"]=> string(6990) " Who doesn’t own a cookbook?  In the age of social media,  one click can find you countless recipes from a wide range of sites including popular FOOD52, Epicurious, Allrecipes, Food Network, and Vermont based Eating Well.  I’ve also discovered clever named sites  like, Yummly,  Chowhound, and Spoonful.  Locating the perfect recipe from any one of these websites and others can be extremely helpful when you don’t have time to peruse your cookbook collection. These days people are on the go, and search on-line for finding almost everything.   However, despite the ease of on-line perfectly suitable recipes, which have a place in today’s world, I believe that there is always room for cookbooks. As we begin gearing up for the holidays, I thought a little seasonal COOKBOOK fun was in order.   It’s simple too!   Post the name of your favorite cookbook or two in the comment section on this blog and you will be entered into a drawing to win a cookbook- The Pleasures of Cooking for One by Judith Jones.  It’s a delightful read complete with helpful cooking tips and the recipes can be easily modified for more than one person. And if you want to add the name of your favorite recipe from that cookbook to your entry- even better! I love cookbooks!  They are constant companions in my kitchen. Over the past few decades, I have compiled three simple, spiral bound collections of recipes have been enjoyed by countless friends.  In 2004, I collaborated with two of my friends and created the third book, Atlantic, Pacific and Green Mountain Recipes. From Soup to Salmon Friends Share Favorites with Friends and Family.  My favorite of the three, complied with two  dear friends,  Anne from Boston’s south shore, and Andrea, from Seattle  shared some of our treasured recipes, from coast to coast.   Our collective friends and family have enjoyed our cookbooks - a regular “go to” for many. You can tell a lot about a person when your browse their cookbook collection.  Perhaps the largest and most diverse collection I have seen belonged to  Judith Jones’ collection  and graced the walls of every room in her NYC apartment where she had upwards of 1000 cookbooks.  In her beloved Vermont retreat Bryn Teg, shelves brim with almost as many.  After her death, a substantial portion of her collection was donated to Sterling College, located in Craftsbury Vermont-  and now able to be enjoyed by students, faculty and friends!  What a bountiful and beautiful legacy, made possible by Bronwyn Jones Dunne. As I browsed my personal cookbook collection, I discovered a 1943 edition of the Joy of Cooking tucked in a corner which hadn’t been touched in decades.  Old, worn and tattered, it is the most popular cookbook in America, but honestly compared to the current cookbooks, I find it somewhat plain and boring.  One of the United States most published cookbooks, it has been in print continuously since it was originally self published in 1936. Almost 20 million copies are in print today.  Well known books by Alice Waters, Ina Garten, Yotam Ottolenghi, Madhur Jaffrey, and Lidia Bastianich,  and an all time favorite,  Julia Childs, Mastering the Art of French Cooking…. among many more are front and center on my kitchen shelf. Recently I saw a very interesting film called Nothing Fancy, a documentary on Diana Kennedy, who is iconic for her numerous Mexican food cookbooks and influence on Mexican Cooking.  Bronwyn was the photographer for her author photo for her cookbook, The Tortilla Book in the 1980’s.  A charming and engaging film brought to Burlington by the Vermont International Film Festival, I highly recommend.   Kennedy put Mexican cooking on the map and at age 96,  is quite a character.  Vermont draws well known cookbook authors – during the past few years, Alice Waters and Jane Nathan are just a few that have visited here. Julia Child drew such a large crowd in St. Johnsbury 25 years ago that the event had to be relocated to the school gymnasium. Cookbooks today have evolved significantly over the decades.  They are often iconic and designed to be owned offering colorful and enticing photos, and text that engage you.  This new brand of cookbooks invite you to read them cover to cover, and not simply for following a recipe. Legendary Judith Jones put many of our current well known and famed cook book authors on the map because she believed in them.  We can be grateful for her ability to recognize talent and worked diligently to publish countless now well -known authors.  She penned several of her own including, Love ME Feed ME,   dedicated to her dog Mabon, and an autobiography,The Tenth Muse, as well as the aforementioned The Pleasures of Cooking for One. Earlier this fall, I traveled to Rochester Vermont for a wedding and visited one of my favorite haunts-Sandy’s Books and Bakery, an eclectic café /bookstore.  Next door they have a smaller space, The Bookery and Annex, that is brimming with an extensive used cookbook collection.  It’s worth a road trip to this sweet small Vermont town, located 50 miles south of Stowe. Peruse your cookbook collection and share with us your favorite cookbook. We will draw a name from all submissions on Monday, December 2nd, and share the list of favorites in our next Blog post. Feel free to name a favorite recipe as well. The Lost Kitchen by Erin French in on my holiday wish list.  You can never own too many cookbooks! Laurie Caswell Burke" ["post_title"]=> string(23) "Our Treasured Cookbooks" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(23) "our-treasured-cookbooks" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-11-29 08:35:57" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-29 12:35:57" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5229" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(2) "18" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#1128 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5217) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 08:56:19" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 12:56:19" ["post_content"]=> string(5936) " October brings a tapestry of fall colors across our Vermont landscapes with yellows, orange and red blazes.  And on almost every door stoop or walkway, pumpkins sit proudly clamoring to be noticed.  I’m always struck by the fact that it seems way too early to put pumpkins out as Halloween is thirty-one days away.  Won’t they be rotten by then?  As I watch more and more pumpkins all shapes and sizes grace front steps, walkways, and roadside stands, I’m determined not to give in this early - why rush things? A week ago, I caved, and bought our family pumpkin which now sits proudly on our front stoop. This year I went for a Cinderella pumpkin, which was one of the most popular and common pumpkins grown in France in the 1800’s.  It’s short and ornamental and bears little resemblance to your traditional taller and smoother Jack- o -Lantern pumpkin.  Cinderella pumpkins are known more for their beauty and the flesh is somewhat sweet and its flavor very subtle. After further research, I discovered that there are British pumpkins, Chinese, Indian and even Australian pumpkins- all somewhat different and something I had never given much thought. Every country appears to have their version of pumpkins. My favorite part of a pumpkin is hands down the seeds that you roast in the oven for about thirty to forty-five minutes until they are dry and then tossed with salt. I usually enjoy them this simple and easy way.  For a sweeter taste, you can toss the seeds with cinnamon and sugar. For a spicier flavor, toss with smoked paprika or a garam masala mix. Extracting the seeds from the slimy flesh and lining them in a single layer on a lightly oiled baking sheet can be messy but worth the work. Pumpkins are one of the most nutritional foods, loaded with anti-oxidants disease-fighting vitamins, they are considered a Superfood that provide a good source of Vitamin A and C. With an abundance of orange pumpkins available I was determined to create a few dishes. Never a big fan of pumpkin pie, I sought other options. On a recent October weekend, I returned to the quaint cottage, Bryn Teg, with Bronwyn with two recipes in hand- one for Curried Pumpkin Soup and the other, Best Ever Pumpkin Muffins.   In the charming kitchen with a view of an expansive landscape ablaze in color, I made the soup.  And I was reminded of an important lesson - not all recipes you find on the internet are always accurate.  As I questioned the four cups of water listed in the ingredients, I reluctantly decided to only add two cups and even then, the soup lacked flavor. With Bronwyn at my side, we managed to salvage the recipe adding more spices and pumpkin to create the most delicious pumpkin soup, - a new version that is now ours to claim.   The muffins were gluten free as I substituted almond flour hoping it would not impact the outcome.  It worked.   They turned out lighter and delicious and for someone who does not typically like muffins – I loved these – a recipe from the Lovely Little Kitchen, modified slightly. We roasted the seeds and ate them like candy.  When I returned home, I went immediately to the Common Roots Farmstand nearby and purchased several more pumpkins to make more roasted seeds.  I highly suggest that before you toss your pumpkins into the compost bin, extract the seeds and roast them! Pumpkins continue to appear everywhere- loaded up on carts at markets, gracing the entrance to farm stands, on roadsides with handmade signs and on our stoops.  Recently at the market, I stood behind a lady who had one Jack-o Lantern on the grocery belt with 3 packages of stencils and tools to carve pumpkins.   I reminisced the days we carved spooky and goofy faces with our young children. Carving pumpkins is fun for all ages and I need to get a Jack- O Lantern before Halloween. As we move closer to November, our brightly colored mums begin to fade, and our pumpkins become softer, I hope you will create something in your kitchen.   A hearty soup, muffins, a pumpkin cheesecake or roasted seeds are a few suggestions.  And beware that if a recipe doesn’t seem right- trust your instincts.   My attitude towards pumpkins has shifted – they are not just for décor and carving spooky faces but offer us a healthy colorful food to enjoy in a multitude of ways. Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight, turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends! -Laurie Caswell Burke" ["post_title"]=> string(32) "Pumpkins of all shapes and sizes" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(258) "Pumpkins are part of autumn tapestry, brightly colored and proudly clamoring to be noticed on stoops, walkways, and farmstand displays.  Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends! " ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(32) "pumpkins-of-all-shapes-and-sizes" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-10-31 17:04:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-10-31 21:04:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5217" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "6" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#1129 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5184) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 08:29:30" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 12:29:30" ["post_content"]=> string(4611) " When I asked a friend from India if she would give me some recipes, she generously made me mountains of delicious homemade Indian food.  But you know the adage, give a man fish vs teaching him to fish - I wanted to know how to make it myself! I asked her to join me in my new kitchen (yes, NEW! We just bought our first home!)  While teaching me to cook, she told me about her childhood in India, how strictly she and her friends do or don't follow tradition, and her family and friends.  I love hearing people's stories.  The world becomes both smaller and larger at the same time, and these are things you can't learn by just reading a recipe. And now, I have three new must-haves for my kitchen repertoire! #1. Cumin Seeds I regularly keep ground cumin on hand, but cumin seeds take it to a whole new level.  They are best used by heating oil in a pan, then stir in cumin seeds until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  It's that easy! Continue making your meal/following your recipe as planned.  Don't worry - there are no hard to chew seeds or husks in the end result. Don't know where to start? Try the basic curry recipe below! #2. Garam Masala Garam masala is a blend of many spices that are toasted prior to being ground together.  The name means "warming spices," not by adding spicy heat, but because in Ayurvedic medicine, these spices "warm" the body, meaning they are said to increase the metabolism. Typical spices included, though there are multiple variations, and this list is not comprehensive: coriander, cumin, cardamom pods, cloves, peppercorn, star anise, turmeric, and fennel. #3. Ginger-Garlic Paste Easy and delicious, this aromatic blend is perfect for cooking meat. To make - add equal parts fresh ginger and garlic, plus a sprinkle of turmeric, purée in a blender or food processor.  Store in an air tight container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. Chicken or Chickpea Curry Ingredients: 1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil 1 Onion 1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds 2 Tomatoes 1 1/2 lb Chicken or 1-2 cans garbanzo beans Garlic and Ginger Purée (see method above) Spices to taste: garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, and either red chili or cayenne if you like some heat Method: Heat olive oil in a large pan over medium heat.  While pan is heating, dice an onion.  Add cumin seeds to pan, and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Add onion and sprinkle with salt.  Stir occasionally until onion is cooked through (about 12 minutes).  While onion is cooking, dice two tomatoes and cut chicken into cubes.  Add tomato and stir gently for 30 seconds.  Add chicken or chickpeas and a generous spoonful of garlic and ginger puree.  Cook uncovered until "raw" smell is gone.  Cover and cook until almost done, stirring occasionally.  Uncover and stir in garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, cayenne, and salt to taste.  Cook until done.  Right before removing from heat, add small handful of chopped cilantro and stir until wilted. 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Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel.

Don't turn your nose up just yet - if you love the combination of sweet & salty in your juicy BBQ Chicken, you'll love BBQ Eel.  Follow the recipe below! One of my favorite dishes at a sushi restaurant is Unagi, which is a fancy way of saying BBQ eel.  I was inspired to make my own after a colleague told me you can fish for eels in the rivers that feed into Lake Champlagne.  Someday I hope to catch my own, but the one used for this meal was a caught by my colleague. I was a squeamish child and young adult, squealing over spiders, bugs, and slimy things.  This squeamishness led to my vegetarian lifestyle, which I practiced for the better part of 10 years, because I struggled in associating my food with the animals the food came from.  You can read more about my food history here if it interests you.  Currently, I would describe my food lifestyle as holistic, non-wasting, DIY, and authentically/locally sourced. The 17 year-old girl in me would have a small heart attack to know she would grow into the woman I am today: butchering and grilling whole, slimy eels.  Eel is rich with omega-3 fatty acids, as well as other good for you vitamins and minerals.  If starting from scratch does not appeal to you, you can find prepared unagi in the frozen meat section of most Asian grocery stores. Find the comprehensive recipe list and serving suggestions here.

BBQ Eel

Ingredients: 1 lb Freshwater Eel 1 cup Unagi Sauce Method: Here is where I admit I am no butchering expert.  I watched some YouTube videos of prepping eel, but the people in the videos are VERY adept with a knife.  So...I took about 30 minutes to do a sloppier job of what the guys in the video did in about 60 seconds.  To prep, gut it, get the bones out, cut in half lengthwise, then cut into 4" steaks.  Leave the skin on - it will help while grilling. Start your grill and turn heat to medium.  While the grill is heating, skewer the steaks. Grill the Eel, skin side down, for three minutes.  Flip and grill another three minutes.  Turn the eel, baste with unagi sauce, and grill one minute skin side.  Flip again, baste with more unagi sauce, and grill one more minute. Until Next Time, Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(40) "dEELicious Flavors for your Summer Grill" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(246) "Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel. Fresh-caught from the rivers that feed into Lake Champlain, eel can be a delicious and unique addition to your summertime grill menu." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(40) "deelicious-flavors-for-your-summer-grill" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 07:26:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 11:26:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5177" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "2" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post_count"]=> int(5) ["current_post"]=> int(0) ["in_the_loop"]=> bool(true) ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#1126 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5278) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "9" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-12-15 13:53:50" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-15 17:53:50" ["post_content"]=> string(6669) "

“Favorite Cookbook Contest” from the last blog post. And the winner is…Kelly Austin!

As I approached the last day of the farm stand that had become a frequent “go to” all summer and autumn I was at a loss. I had been seeing the bright yellow signs on the roadside that said November 24 –LAST DAY, but I was in denial. Common Roots, (www.commonroots.org) a farm stand and CSA, located off Spear Street at the intersection of Allen Road in South Burlington had become part of my weekly ritual. Where would I buy my vegetables, eggs, garlic, fresh local meat…? I also believed strongly in their mission which supports local food systems and provides food security for families and schools by fostering the relationships among farmers, educators, and the wider community.

The Friday before the pending closure for the season, my dear friend, Janet who lives in Boston made a surprise to visit to my house. I shared my disappointment with her. Her response.
“Let’s go together tomorrow and we’ll make it fun!” So off we went to Common Roots- a mile from my home to a place where farmers grow fresh organic produce in surrounding fields and also source eggs, cheese, Kombucha, meats, pickled green beans and more. It was chilly inside the charming little farm shop and there wasn’t much left on the shelves. Brown paper bags filled with Thanksgiving shares for CSA members were crowded together on a center table, waiting to be picked up. We grabbed our canvas bags and managed to fill them to the brim, as I explained to Janet that all summer and fall these shelves had been brimming local food from the fields. As we left, she patted me on the back with a you’ll be fine. Spring will return soon enough. HA! And doesn’t Vermont have Winter Farmers markets?

I imagine that many of you have felt similar feelings putting gardens to bed, bidding farewell to local farm stands and the local Farmers Markets. We have been so use to abundant locally grown food through - out the summer and autumn months, however the transition to late fall and winter isn’t always easy.

Fortunate for Vermonters there are over 18 Farmers Markets scattered around our state that offer abundant opportunities to find food, fun and much more. As December rolled in I suggested to Bronwyn that we visit our local Burlington Farmers market at the UVM Davis Center with anticipation of finding some good produce, and some ideas for holiday shopping. We found so much more. First, the parking was FREE!

And as we descended the stairs to the atrium level of the Davis Center, there was lively music playing and a wonderful array of tables filled to the brim with vegetables, cheese, coffee, hot chocolate, artisan crafts and more. Folks were having convivial conversations. This was clearly a happening place that I immediately knew I would be visiting all winter long.

We did a first blush walk through and on our second go I think we had almost parted with our money at every booth and had some special conversations with the vendors. We left with Orb Weaver Cheese, Specialty mushrooms, squash, the most beautiful eggs, kale, beets, soft cows cheese and an adorable hand carved ornament. It was so much fun. And to top it all off we shared the most delicious hot chocolate on the planet from a talented local chocolate maker.

What I found interesting was the stories these farmers and vendors shared with us. The scrumptious food and beautiful creative artisan goods reflected a sincere passion for their work. Their positive energy was contagious.

The Burlington Farmers market will run every Saturday between now and Christmas from 10am-2pm, and then once a month through April. If you live in Vermont, you can locate a Farmers Market near you by visiting -www.nofavt.org/vtfarmersmarkets or call 802-434-4122. And my sense is that wherever you live – there are options near you!

We can all continue to enjoy seasonal local food thanks to our hard -working farmers!

Last Blog’s Cookbook contest was such fun and our very first entrant, Kelly Austin, was the winner- her favorite cookbook…. Half Baked Harvest by Tieghan Gerard. Sweet little Mabon got in on the fun and picked our winner! Congratulations Kelly and enjoy your prize, Cooking for One, by Judith Jones- a treasure of a cookbook! Thank you to everyone who shared their favorites with us!

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Our Treasured Cookbooks

Who doesn’t own a cookbook?  In the age of social media,  one click can find you countless recipes from a wide range of sites including popular FOOD52, Epicurious, Allrecipes, Food Network, and Vermont based Eating Well.  I’ve also discovered clever named sites  like, Yummly,  Chowhound, and Spoonful.  Locating the perfect recipe from any one of these websites and others can be extremely helpful when you don’t have time to peruse your cookbook collection. These days people are on the go, and search on-line for finding almost everything.   However, despite the ease of on-line perfectly suitable recipes, which have a place in today’s world, I believe that there is always room for cookbooks.

As we begin gearing up for the holidays, I thought a little seasonal COOKBOOK fun was in order.   It’s simple too!   Post the name of your favorite cookbook or two in the comment section on this blog and you will be entered into a drawing to win a cookbook- The Pleasures of Cooking for One by Judith Jones.  It’s a delightful read complete with helpful cooking tips and the recipes can be easily modified for more than one person. And if you want to add the name of your favorite recipe from that cookbook to your entry- even better!

I love cookbooks!  They are constant companions in my kitchen. Over the past few decades, I have compiled three simple, spiral bound collections of recipes have been enjoyed by countless friends.  In 2004, I collaborated with two of my friends and created the third book, Atlantic, Pacific and Green Mountain Recipes. From Soup to Salmon Friends Share Favorites with Friends and Family.  My favorite of the three, complied with two  dear friends,  Anne from Boston’s south shore, and Andrea, from Seattle  shared some of our treasured recipes, from coast to coast.   Our collective friends and family have enjoyed our cookbooks – a regular “go to” for many.

You can tell a lot about a person when your browse their cookbook collection.  Perhaps the largest and most diverse collection I have seen belonged to  Judith Jones’ collection  and graced the walls of every room in her NYC apartment where she had upwards of 1000 cookbooks.  In her beloved Vermont retreat Bryn Teg, shelves brim with almost as many.  After her death, a substantial portion of her collection was donated to Sterling College, located in Craftsbury Vermont-  and now able to be enjoyed by students, faculty and friends!  What a bountiful and beautiful legacy, made possible by Bronwyn Jones Dunne.

As I browsed my personal cookbook collection, I discovered a 1943 edition of the Joy of Cooking tucked in a corner which hadn’t been touched in decades.  Old, worn and tattered, it is the most popular cookbook in America, but honestly compared to the current cookbooks, I find it somewhat plain and boring.  One of the United States most published cookbooks, it has been in print continuously since it was originally self published in 1936. Almost 20 million copies are in print today.  Well known books by Alice Waters, Ina Garten, Yotam Ottolenghi, Madhur Jaffrey, and Lidia Bastianich,  and an all time favorite,  Julia Childs, Mastering the Art of French Cooking…. among many more are front and center on my kitchen shelf.

Recently I saw a very interesting film called Nothing Fancy, a documentary on Diana Kennedy, who is iconic for her numerous Mexican food cookbooks and influence on Mexican Cooking.  Bronwyn was the photographer for her author photo for her cookbook, The Tortilla Book in the 1980’s.  A charming and engaging film brought to Burlington by the Vermont International Film Festival, I highly recommend.   Kennedy put Mexican cooking on the map and at age 96,  is quite a character.  Vermont draws well known cookbook authors – during the past few years, Alice Waters and Jane Nathan are just a few that have visited here. Julia Child drew such a large crowd in St. Johnsbury 25 years ago that the event had to be relocated to the school gymnasium.

Cookbooks today have evolved significantly over the decades.  They are often iconic and designed to be owned offering colorful and enticing photos, and text that engage you.  This new brand of cookbooks invite you to read them cover to cover, and not simply for following a recipe.

Legendary Judith Jones put many of our current well known and famed cook book authors on the map because she believed in them.  We can be grateful for her ability to recognize talent and worked diligently to publish countless now well -known authors.  She penned several of her own including, Love ME Feed ME,   dedicated to her dog Mabon, and an autobiography,The Tenth Muse, as well as the aforementioned The Pleasures of Cooking for One.

Earlier this fall, I traveled to Rochester Vermont for a wedding and visited one of my favorite haunts-Sandy’s Books and Bakery, an eclectic café /bookstore.  Next door they have a smaller space, The Bookery and Annex, that is brimming with an extensive used cookbook collection.  It’s worth a road trip to this sweet small Vermont town, located 50 miles south of Stowe.

Peruse your cookbook collection and share with us your favorite cookbook. We will draw a name from all submissions on Monday, December 2nd, and share the list of favorites in our next Blog post. Feel free to name a favorite recipe as well.

The Lost Kitchen by Erin French in on my holiday wish list.  You can never own too many cookbooks!

Laurie Caswell Burke

Posted: 11-18-2019

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“Favorite Cookbook Contest” from the last blog post. And the winner is…Kelly Austin!

As I approached the last day of the farm stand that had become a frequent “go to” all summer and autumn I was at a loss. I had been seeing the bright yellow signs on the roadside that said November 24 –LAST DAY, but I was in denial. Common Roots, (www.commonroots.org) a farm stand and CSA, located off Spear Street at the intersection of Allen Road in South Burlington had become part of my weekly ritual. Where would I buy my vegetables, eggs, garlic, fresh local meat…? I also believed strongly in their mission which supports local food systems and provides food security for families and schools by fostering the relationships among farmers, educators, and the wider community.

The Friday before the pending closure for the season, my dear friend, Janet who lives in Boston made a surprise to visit to my house. I shared my disappointment with her. Her response.
“Let’s go together tomorrow and we’ll make it fun!” So off we went to Common Roots- a mile from my home to a place where farmers grow fresh organic produce in surrounding fields and also source eggs, cheese, Kombucha, meats, pickled green beans and more. It was chilly inside the charming little farm shop and there wasn’t much left on the shelves. Brown paper bags filled with Thanksgiving shares for CSA members were crowded together on a center table, waiting to be picked up. We grabbed our canvas bags and managed to fill them to the brim, as I explained to Janet that all summer and fall these shelves had been brimming local food from the fields. As we left, she patted me on the back with a you’ll be fine. Spring will return soon enough. HA! And doesn’t Vermont have Winter Farmers markets?

I imagine that many of you have felt similar feelings putting gardens to bed, bidding farewell to local farm stands and the local Farmers Markets. We have been so use to abundant locally grown food through - out the summer and autumn months, however the transition to late fall and winter isn’t always easy.

Fortunate for Vermonters there are over 18 Farmers Markets scattered around our state that offer abundant opportunities to find food, fun and much more. As December rolled in I suggested to Bronwyn that we visit our local Burlington Farmers market at the UVM Davis Center with anticipation of finding some good produce, and some ideas for holiday shopping. We found so much more. First, the parking was FREE!

And as we descended the stairs to the atrium level of the Davis Center, there was lively music playing and a wonderful array of tables filled to the brim with vegetables, cheese, coffee, hot chocolate, artisan crafts and more. Folks were having convivial conversations. This was clearly a happening place that I immediately knew I would be visiting all winter long.

We did a first blush walk through and on our second go I think we had almost parted with our money at every booth and had some special conversations with the vendors. We left with Orb Weaver Cheese, Specialty mushrooms, squash, the most beautiful eggs, kale, beets, soft cows cheese and an adorable hand carved ornament. It was so much fun. And to top it all off we shared the most delicious hot chocolate on the planet from a talented local chocolate maker.

What I found interesting was the stories these farmers and vendors shared with us. The scrumptious food and beautiful creative artisan goods reflected a sincere passion for their work. Their positive energy was contagious.

The Burlington Farmers market will run every Saturday between now and Christmas from 10am-2pm, and then once a month through April. If you live in Vermont, you can locate a Farmers Market near you by visiting -www.nofavt.org/vtfarmersmarkets or call 802-434-4122. And my sense is that wherever you live – there are options near you!

We can all continue to enjoy seasonal local food thanks to our hard -working farmers!

Last Blog’s Cookbook contest was such fun and our very first entrant, Kelly Austin, was the winner- her favorite cookbook…. Half Baked Harvest by Tieghan Gerard. Sweet little Mabon got in on the fun and picked our winner! Congratulations Kelly and enjoy your prize, Cooking for One, by Judith Jones- a treasure of a cookbook! Thank you to everyone who shared their favorites with us!

" ["post_title"]=> string(24) "Love food? Love Farmers!" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(22) "love-food-love-farmers" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-12-15 17:46:04" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-15 21:46:04" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5278" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#1124 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5229) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-18 18:58:50" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-18 22:58:50" ["post_content"]=> string(6990) " Who doesn’t own a cookbook?  In the age of social media,  one click can find you countless recipes from a wide range of sites including popular FOOD52, Epicurious, Allrecipes, Food Network, and Vermont based Eating Well.  I’ve also discovered clever named sites  like, Yummly,  Chowhound, and Spoonful.  Locating the perfect recipe from any one of these websites and others can be extremely helpful when you don’t have time to peruse your cookbook collection. These days people are on the go, and search on-line for finding almost everything.   However, despite the ease of on-line perfectly suitable recipes, which have a place in today’s world, I believe that there is always room for cookbooks. As we begin gearing up for the holidays, I thought a little seasonal COOKBOOK fun was in order.   It’s simple too!   Post the name of your favorite cookbook or two in the comment section on this blog and you will be entered into a drawing to win a cookbook- The Pleasures of Cooking for One by Judith Jones.  It’s a delightful read complete with helpful cooking tips and the recipes can be easily modified for more than one person. And if you want to add the name of your favorite recipe from that cookbook to your entry- even better! I love cookbooks!  They are constant companions in my kitchen. Over the past few decades, I have compiled three simple, spiral bound collections of recipes have been enjoyed by countless friends.  In 2004, I collaborated with two of my friends and created the third book, Atlantic, Pacific and Green Mountain Recipes. From Soup to Salmon Friends Share Favorites with Friends and Family.  My favorite of the three, complied with two  dear friends,  Anne from Boston’s south shore, and Andrea, from Seattle  shared some of our treasured recipes, from coast to coast.   Our collective friends and family have enjoyed our cookbooks - a regular “go to” for many. You can tell a lot about a person when your browse their cookbook collection.  Perhaps the largest and most diverse collection I have seen belonged to  Judith Jones’ collection  and graced the walls of every room in her NYC apartment where she had upwards of 1000 cookbooks.  In her beloved Vermont retreat Bryn Teg, shelves brim with almost as many.  After her death, a substantial portion of her collection was donated to Sterling College, located in Craftsbury Vermont-  and now able to be enjoyed by students, faculty and friends!  What a bountiful and beautiful legacy, made possible by Bronwyn Jones Dunne. As I browsed my personal cookbook collection, I discovered a 1943 edition of the Joy of Cooking tucked in a corner which hadn’t been touched in decades.  Old, worn and tattered, it is the most popular cookbook in America, but honestly compared to the current cookbooks, I find it somewhat plain and boring.  One of the United States most published cookbooks, it has been in print continuously since it was originally self published in 1936. Almost 20 million copies are in print today.  Well known books by Alice Waters, Ina Garten, Yotam Ottolenghi, Madhur Jaffrey, and Lidia Bastianich,  and an all time favorite,  Julia Childs, Mastering the Art of French Cooking…. among many more are front and center on my kitchen shelf. Recently I saw a very interesting film called Nothing Fancy, a documentary on Diana Kennedy, who is iconic for her numerous Mexican food cookbooks and influence on Mexican Cooking.  Bronwyn was the photographer for her author photo for her cookbook, The Tortilla Book in the 1980’s.  A charming and engaging film brought to Burlington by the Vermont International Film Festival, I highly recommend.   Kennedy put Mexican cooking on the map and at age 96,  is quite a character.  Vermont draws well known cookbook authors – during the past few years, Alice Waters and Jane Nathan are just a few that have visited here. Julia Child drew such a large crowd in St. Johnsbury 25 years ago that the event had to be relocated to the school gymnasium. Cookbooks today have evolved significantly over the decades.  They are often iconic and designed to be owned offering colorful and enticing photos, and text that engage you.  This new brand of cookbooks invite you to read them cover to cover, and not simply for following a recipe. Legendary Judith Jones put many of our current well known and famed cook book authors on the map because she believed in them.  We can be grateful for her ability to recognize talent and worked diligently to publish countless now well -known authors.  She penned several of her own including, Love ME Feed ME,   dedicated to her dog Mabon, and an autobiography,The Tenth Muse, as well as the aforementioned The Pleasures of Cooking for One. Earlier this fall, I traveled to Rochester Vermont for a wedding and visited one of my favorite haunts-Sandy’s Books and Bakery, an eclectic café /bookstore.  Next door they have a smaller space, The Bookery and Annex, that is brimming with an extensive used cookbook collection.  It’s worth a road trip to this sweet small Vermont town, located 50 miles south of Stowe. Peruse your cookbook collection and share with us your favorite cookbook. We will draw a name from all submissions on Monday, December 2nd, and share the list of favorites in our next Blog post. Feel free to name a favorite recipe as well. The Lost Kitchen by Erin French in on my holiday wish list.  You can never own too many cookbooks! Laurie Caswell Burke" ["post_title"]=> string(23) "Our Treasured Cookbooks" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(23) "our-treasured-cookbooks" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-11-29 08:35:57" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-29 12:35:57" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5229" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(2) "18" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#1128 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5217) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 08:56:19" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 12:56:19" ["post_content"]=> string(5936) " October brings a tapestry of fall colors across our Vermont landscapes with yellows, orange and red blazes.  And on almost every door stoop or walkway, pumpkins sit proudly clamoring to be noticed.  I’m always struck by the fact that it seems way too early to put pumpkins out as Halloween is thirty-one days away.  Won’t they be rotten by then?  As I watch more and more pumpkins all shapes and sizes grace front steps, walkways, and roadside stands, I’m determined not to give in this early - why rush things? A week ago, I caved, and bought our family pumpkin which now sits proudly on our front stoop. This year I went for a Cinderella pumpkin, which was one of the most popular and common pumpkins grown in France in the 1800’s.  It’s short and ornamental and bears little resemblance to your traditional taller and smoother Jack- o -Lantern pumpkin.  Cinderella pumpkins are known more for their beauty and the flesh is somewhat sweet and its flavor very subtle. After further research, I discovered that there are British pumpkins, Chinese, Indian and even Australian pumpkins- all somewhat different and something I had never given much thought. Every country appears to have their version of pumpkins. My favorite part of a pumpkin is hands down the seeds that you roast in the oven for about thirty to forty-five minutes until they are dry and then tossed with salt. I usually enjoy them this simple and easy way.  For a sweeter taste, you can toss the seeds with cinnamon and sugar. For a spicier flavor, toss with smoked paprika or a garam masala mix. Extracting the seeds from the slimy flesh and lining them in a single layer on a lightly oiled baking sheet can be messy but worth the work. Pumpkins are one of the most nutritional foods, loaded with anti-oxidants disease-fighting vitamins, they are considered a Superfood that provide a good source of Vitamin A and C. With an abundance of orange pumpkins available I was determined to create a few dishes. Never a big fan of pumpkin pie, I sought other options. On a recent October weekend, I returned to the quaint cottage, Bryn Teg, with Bronwyn with two recipes in hand- one for Curried Pumpkin Soup and the other, Best Ever Pumpkin Muffins.   In the charming kitchen with a view of an expansive landscape ablaze in color, I made the soup.  And I was reminded of an important lesson - not all recipes you find on the internet are always accurate.  As I questioned the four cups of water listed in the ingredients, I reluctantly decided to only add two cups and even then, the soup lacked flavor. With Bronwyn at my side, we managed to salvage the recipe adding more spices and pumpkin to create the most delicious pumpkin soup, - a new version that is now ours to claim.   The muffins were gluten free as I substituted almond flour hoping it would not impact the outcome.  It worked.   They turned out lighter and delicious and for someone who does not typically like muffins – I loved these – a recipe from the Lovely Little Kitchen, modified slightly. We roasted the seeds and ate them like candy.  When I returned home, I went immediately to the Common Roots Farmstand nearby and purchased several more pumpkins to make more roasted seeds.  I highly suggest that before you toss your pumpkins into the compost bin, extract the seeds and roast them! Pumpkins continue to appear everywhere- loaded up on carts at markets, gracing the entrance to farm stands, on roadsides with handmade signs and on our stoops.  Recently at the market, I stood behind a lady who had one Jack-o Lantern on the grocery belt with 3 packages of stencils and tools to carve pumpkins.   I reminisced the days we carved spooky and goofy faces with our young children. Carving pumpkins is fun for all ages and I need to get a Jack- O Lantern before Halloween. As we move closer to November, our brightly colored mums begin to fade, and our pumpkins become softer, I hope you will create something in your kitchen.   A hearty soup, muffins, a pumpkin cheesecake or roasted seeds are a few suggestions.  And beware that if a recipe doesn’t seem right- trust your instincts.   My attitude towards pumpkins has shifted – they are not just for décor and carving spooky faces but offer us a healthy colorful food to enjoy in a multitude of ways. Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight, turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends! -Laurie Caswell Burke" ["post_title"]=> string(32) "Pumpkins of all shapes and sizes" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(258) "Pumpkins are part of autumn tapestry, brightly colored and proudly clamoring to be noticed on stoops, walkways, and farmstand displays.  Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends! " ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(32) "pumpkins-of-all-shapes-and-sizes" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-10-31 17:04:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-10-31 21:04:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5217" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "6" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#1129 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5184) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 08:29:30" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 12:29:30" ["post_content"]=> string(4611) " When I asked a friend from India if she would give me some recipes, she generously made me mountains of delicious homemade Indian food.  But you know the adage, give a man fish vs teaching him to fish - I wanted to know how to make it myself! I asked her to join me in my new kitchen (yes, NEW! We just bought our first home!)  While teaching me to cook, she told me about her childhood in India, how strictly she and her friends do or don't follow tradition, and her family and friends.  I love hearing people's stories.  The world becomes both smaller and larger at the same time, and these are things you can't learn by just reading a recipe. And now, I have three new must-haves for my kitchen repertoire! #1. Cumin Seeds I regularly keep ground cumin on hand, but cumin seeds take it to a whole new level.  They are best used by heating oil in a pan, then stir in cumin seeds until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  It's that easy! Continue making your meal/following your recipe as planned.  Don't worry - there are no hard to chew seeds or husks in the end result. Don't know where to start? Try the basic curry recipe below! #2. Garam Masala Garam masala is a blend of many spices that are toasted prior to being ground together.  The name means "warming spices," not by adding spicy heat, but because in Ayurvedic medicine, these spices "warm" the body, meaning they are said to increase the metabolism. Typical spices included, though there are multiple variations, and this list is not comprehensive: coriander, cumin, cardamom pods, cloves, peppercorn, star anise, turmeric, and fennel. #3. Ginger-Garlic Paste Easy and delicious, this aromatic blend is perfect for cooking meat. To make - add equal parts fresh ginger and garlic, plus a sprinkle of turmeric, purée in a blender or food processor.  Store in an air tight container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. Chicken or Chickpea Curry Ingredients: 1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil 1 Onion 1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds 2 Tomatoes 1 1/2 lb Chicken or 1-2 cans garbanzo beans Garlic and Ginger Purée (see method above) Spices to taste: garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, and either red chili or cayenne if you like some heat Method: Heat olive oil in a large pan over medium heat.  While pan is heating, dice an onion.  Add cumin seeds to pan, and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Add onion and sprinkle with salt.  Stir occasionally until onion is cooked through (about 12 minutes).  While onion is cooking, dice two tomatoes and cut chicken into cubes.  Add tomato and stir gently for 30 seconds.  Add chicken or chickpeas and a generous spoonful of garlic and ginger puree.  Cook uncovered until "raw" smell is gone.  Cover and cook until almost done, stirring occasionally.  Uncover and stir in garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, cayenne, and salt to taste.  Cook until done.  Right before removing from heat, add small handful of chopped cilantro and stir until wilted. Jeera Rice (Coriander Rice) Ingredients: 1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil 1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds Handful Fresh Cilantro Salt to taste 1 cup rice 2 cup water or broth Method: Heat olive oil in a small pan.  Add cumin seeds and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Meanwhile, chop a small bunch of cilantro.  Add to cumin and oil and stir until wilted and coated with olive oil (about 15 seconds).  Add cumin and cilantro mix, plus salt to taste, to whatever vessel you plan to cook your rice with.  Prepare rice the same as you normally would (we use our pressure cooker)." ["post_title"]=> string(43) "Three New Must-Haves For Your Spice Cabinet" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(186) "Add spice to your life by including these three new flavors to your list of kitchen essentials. Inspired by Indian cooking, these ingredients are versatile and tasty - recipes included!" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(43) "three-new-must-haves-for-your-spice-cabinet" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 08:30:01" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 12:30:01" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5184" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "4" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#1207 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5177) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 07:26:48" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 11:26:48" ["post_content"]=> string(3807) "

Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel.

Don't turn your nose up just yet - if you love the combination of sweet & salty in your juicy BBQ Chicken, you'll love BBQ Eel.  Follow the recipe below! One of my favorite dishes at a sushi restaurant is Unagi, which is a fancy way of saying BBQ eel.  I was inspired to make my own after a colleague told me you can fish for eels in the rivers that feed into Lake Champlagne.  Someday I hope to catch my own, but the one used for this meal was a caught by my colleague. I was a squeamish child and young adult, squealing over spiders, bugs, and slimy things.  This squeamishness led to my vegetarian lifestyle, which I practiced for the better part of 10 years, because I struggled in associating my food with the animals the food came from.  You can read more about my food history here if it interests you.  Currently, I would describe my food lifestyle as holistic, non-wasting, DIY, and authentically/locally sourced. The 17 year-old girl in me would have a small heart attack to know she would grow into the woman I am today: butchering and grilling whole, slimy eels.  Eel is rich with omega-3 fatty acids, as well as other good for you vitamins and minerals.  If starting from scratch does not appeal to you, you can find prepared unagi in the frozen meat section of most Asian grocery stores. Find the comprehensive recipe list and serving suggestions here.

BBQ Eel

Ingredients: 1 lb Freshwater Eel 1 cup Unagi Sauce Method: Here is where I admit I am no butchering expert.  I watched some YouTube videos of prepping eel, but the people in the videos are VERY adept with a knife.  So...I took about 30 minutes to do a sloppier job of what the guys in the video did in about 60 seconds.  To prep, gut it, get the bones out, cut in half lengthwise, then cut into 4" steaks.  Leave the skin on - it will help while grilling. Start your grill and turn heat to medium.  While the grill is heating, skewer the steaks. Grill the Eel, skin side down, for three minutes.  Flip and grill another three minutes.  Turn the eel, baste with unagi sauce, and grill one minute skin side.  Flip again, baste with more unagi sauce, and grill one more minute. Until Next Time, Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(40) "dEELicious Flavors for your Summer Grill" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(246) "Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel. Fresh-caught from the rivers that feed into Lake Champlain, eel can be a delicious and unique addition to your summertime grill menu." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(40) "deelicious-flavors-for-your-summer-grill" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 07:26:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 11:26:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5177" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "2" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post_count"]=> int(5) ["current_post"]=> int(1) ["in_the_loop"]=> bool(true) ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#1124 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5229) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-18 18:58:50" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-18 22:58:50" ["post_content"]=> string(6990) " Who doesn’t own a cookbook?  In the age of social media,  one click can find you countless recipes from a wide range of sites including popular FOOD52, Epicurious, Allrecipes, Food Network, and Vermont based Eating Well.  I’ve also discovered clever named sites  like, Yummly,  Chowhound, and Spoonful.  Locating the perfect recipe from any one of these websites and others can be extremely helpful when you don’t have time to peruse your cookbook collection. These days people are on the go, and search on-line for finding almost everything.   However, despite the ease of on-line perfectly suitable recipes, which have a place in today’s world, I believe that there is always room for cookbooks. As we begin gearing up for the holidays, I thought a little seasonal COOKBOOK fun was in order.   It’s simple too!   Post the name of your favorite cookbook or two in the comment section on this blog and you will be entered into a drawing to win a cookbook- The Pleasures of Cooking for One by Judith Jones.  It’s a delightful read complete with helpful cooking tips and the recipes can be easily modified for more than one person. And if you want to add the name of your favorite recipe from that cookbook to your entry- even better! I love cookbooks!  They are constant companions in my kitchen. Over the past few decades, I have compiled three simple, spiral bound collections of recipes have been enjoyed by countless friends.  In 2004, I collaborated with two of my friends and created the third book, Atlantic, Pacific and Green Mountain Recipes. From Soup to Salmon Friends Share Favorites with Friends and Family.  My favorite of the three, complied with two  dear friends,  Anne from Boston’s south shore, and Andrea, from Seattle  shared some of our treasured recipes, from coast to coast.   Our collective friends and family have enjoyed our cookbooks - a regular “go to” for many. You can tell a lot about a person when your browse their cookbook collection.  Perhaps the largest and most diverse collection I have seen belonged to  Judith Jones’ collection  and graced the walls of every room in her NYC apartment where she had upwards of 1000 cookbooks.  In her beloved Vermont retreat Bryn Teg, shelves brim with almost as many.  After her death, a substantial portion of her collection was donated to Sterling College, located in Craftsbury Vermont-  and now able to be enjoyed by students, faculty and friends!  What a bountiful and beautiful legacy, made possible by Bronwyn Jones Dunne. As I browsed my personal cookbook collection, I discovered a 1943 edition of the Joy of Cooking tucked in a corner which hadn’t been touched in decades.  Old, worn and tattered, it is the most popular cookbook in America, but honestly compared to the current cookbooks, I find it somewhat plain and boring.  One of the United States most published cookbooks, it has been in print continuously since it was originally self published in 1936. Almost 20 million copies are in print today.  Well known books by Alice Waters, Ina Garten, Yotam Ottolenghi, Madhur Jaffrey, and Lidia Bastianich,  and an all time favorite,  Julia Childs, Mastering the Art of French Cooking…. among many more are front and center on my kitchen shelf. Recently I saw a very interesting film called Nothing Fancy, a documentary on Diana Kennedy, who is iconic for her numerous Mexican food cookbooks and influence on Mexican Cooking.  Bronwyn was the photographer for her author photo for her cookbook, The Tortilla Book in the 1980’s.  A charming and engaging film brought to Burlington by the Vermont International Film Festival, I highly recommend.   Kennedy put Mexican cooking on the map and at age 96,  is quite a character.  Vermont draws well known cookbook authors – during the past few years, Alice Waters and Jane Nathan are just a few that have visited here. Julia Child drew such a large crowd in St. Johnsbury 25 years ago that the event had to be relocated to the school gymnasium. Cookbooks today have evolved significantly over the decades.  They are often iconic and designed to be owned offering colorful and enticing photos, and text that engage you.  This new brand of cookbooks invite you to read them cover to cover, and not simply for following a recipe. Legendary Judith Jones put many of our current well known and famed cook book authors on the map because she believed in them.  We can be grateful for her ability to recognize talent and worked diligently to publish countless now well -known authors.  She penned several of her own including, Love ME Feed ME,   dedicated to her dog Mabon, and an autobiography,The Tenth Muse, as well as the aforementioned The Pleasures of Cooking for One. Earlier this fall, I traveled to Rochester Vermont for a wedding and visited one of my favorite haunts-Sandy’s Books and Bakery, an eclectic café /bookstore.  Next door they have a smaller space, The Bookery and Annex, that is brimming with an extensive used cookbook collection.  It’s worth a road trip to this sweet small Vermont town, located 50 miles south of Stowe. Peruse your cookbook collection and share with us your favorite cookbook. We will draw a name from all submissions on Monday, December 2nd, and share the list of favorites in our next Blog post. Feel free to name a favorite recipe as well. The Lost Kitchen by Erin French in on my holiday wish list.  You can never own too many cookbooks! 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18 responses to “Our Treasured Cookbooks”

  1. Bronwyn says:

    I already own, The Pleasures of Cooking for One, and it a delightful, fun cookbook. I have enjoyed many of the recipes, and they are even more special having had the great pleasure of knowing Judith Jones in her later years.
    Laurie

  2. Kelly Austin says:

    Half Baked Harvest by Tiegan Gerard
    Given to me by a friend; everything I have made from it has been delicious!

  3. Carole Bugge says:

    My Facebook is Simca’s Cuisine by Simone Beck.

  4. Bronwyn says:

    Thank you, Kelly, for your submission to the drawing. I haven’t heard of the cookbook but that’s what’s fun about sharing. Discovering new cookbooks is always a pleasure for me.

  5. Angela Drexel says:

    I’m not someone who reads cookbooks voraciously. However, one cookbook that has inspires me to cook is “With a Measure of Grace” – The Story and Recipes of a Small Town Restaurant. I love the integration of story, locality and food that all come together so beautifully at Hells Backbone Kitchen and in the book. The Mac N Cheese is yum!

  6. Faith R. says:

    While I’m trending toward more online recipe browsing, I still find the Silver Palate to be one of my go-to cookbooks with some favorite and reliable recipes, like their Chili for a Crowd.

  7. Laurie says:

    I have SO many favorite cookbooks that I love to read and cook from. Like many of you have shared I also tend to go on-line and love the New York Times recipes and Food52. My current favorite cookbook is The Art of Simple Food by Alice Waters. It’s beautifully designed with great cooking tips.

  8. Lisa says:

    I try to choose a cookbook to cook from each month and have found (re-found) many favorites. My current favorite is Six Seasons, we love the flavors and how we’re eating more vegetables.

  9. Kelly peers says:

    This may sound like baloney but it’s not…one of my favorite cookbooks is “The World of Cheese” by Evan Jones. I bought it at the culinary institute’s swap meet in St. Helena at least 20 years ago. It has this cheesecake recipe. Which I have made at least 50 times. Which brought me to your website, hoping to find and pin it in case anything ever happens to this book! Happy thanksgiving…I’m making it again today! Bronwyn=cheesecake celebrity in this Napa house!

  10. Bronwyn says:

    What a lovely Thanksgiving gift! Thank you, Kelly! I still think after all these years that the cheesecake recipe I contributed to my father’s book is the best I’ve ever eaten. The story behind it involves a mother-in-law’s cook and her recipe that didn’t work for numerous tries until finally I got the baking time right. So, I really have to thank the fact that good cooks don’t always “share” everything they know. I was forced to tweak this one until it really worked! I’m glad you enjoy my father’s book on cheese -the first written by an American. He loved cheese!

  11. Corrie Austin says:

    My favorite is Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon. I actually posted my favorite recipe, winter root soup, on this blog already!

  12. Bronwyn says:

    Thank you Corrie. Heading to the winter Farmers Market on Saturday and you have inspired me to purchase many root vegetables to make this soup- the winter solstice is on the horizon! Laurie

  13. Janet says:

    Bakery Lane Soup Bowl Cookbook-was beloved restaurant in Middlebury, VT

    Beer cheese soup and chocolate cheesecake recipes are favorites.

  14. Bronwyn says:

    Janet- you brought back so many memories of this beloved restaurant in Middlebury. I still have my copy but it is literally falling apart and been taped together countless times! Truly a lovely cookbook! Thank you dear friend for the memories….
    Laurie

  15. Lovely article drawing attention to our favorite & cherished cookbook collections…how to choose one! It is so simple to google recipes based on what’s available in the refrigerator, but curling up in a comfy chair with a favorite cookbook or two and perusing recipes before a cooking opportunity is an unmatched delight. I, too, love Judith Jones’ Cooking for One, easy to double and a simple collection of delightful French cooking. I almost must add Julia Child’s The Way to Cook — and especially love the Reine de Saba — I prescribe to Julia’s philosophy — ‘everything in moderation’ and ‘if you’re going to make one, make two and freeze’! Currently, I’m loving Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street print and digital subscription (special $1/yr) for a glimpse at contemporary cooking!

  16. Bronwyn says:

    Laurie Shares: Thank you Anne for this lovely sentiment as I know you adore cooking and I love that you use Judith Jone’s cookbook that I gave you last year as a holiday gift! I think we will all benefit from your lovely post! You make a great point about freezing which can be very efficient which you always are!

  17. Laurie says:

    Laurie shares: Anne I also want to express my gratitude for the lovely Andi’s People design that graced the cover of our cookbook. Adding it to this Blog post brought back so many memories. Andi’s People cards and art are unique and so special. Thank you Anne!

  18. Molly S says:

    I have recently been enjoying the Oh She Glows cookbook! Although I am not a vegan, I do appreciate the author’s creativity and ability to craft together elegant plant filled meals. One recipe I really enjoyed recently was the veggie enchiladas. Incredibly flavorful for not having any meat or dairy!

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Pumpkins of all shapes and sizes

October brings a tapestry of fall colors across our Vermont landscapes with yellows, orange and red blazes.  And on almost every door stoop or walkway, pumpkins sit proudly clamoring to be noticed.  I’m always struck by the fact that it seems way too early to put pumpkins out as Halloween is thirty-one days away.  Won’t they be rotten by then?  As I watch more and more pumpkins all shapes and sizes grace front steps, walkways, and roadside stands, I’m determined not to give in this early – why rush things?

A week ago, I caved, and bought our family pumpkin which now sits proudly on our front stoop. This year I went for a Cinderella pumpkin, which was one of the most popular and common pumpkins grown in France in the 1800’s.  It’s short and ornamental and bears little resemblance to your traditional taller and smoother Jack- o -Lantern pumpkin.  Cinderella pumpkins are known more for their beauty and the flesh is somewhat sweet and its flavor very subtle.

After further research, I discovered that there are British pumpkins, Chinese, Indian and even Australian pumpkins- all somewhat different and something I had never given much thought.

Every country appears to have their version of pumpkins.

My favorite part of a pumpkin is hands down the seeds that you roast in the oven for about thirty to forty-five minutes until they are dry and then tossed with salt. I usually enjoy them this simple and easy way.  For a sweeter taste, you can toss the seeds with cinnamon and sugar. For a spicier flavor, toss with smoked paprika or a garam masala mix. Extracting the seeds from the slimy flesh and lining them in a single layer on a lightly oiled baking sheet can be messy but worth the work.

Pumpkins are one of the most nutritional foods, loaded with anti-oxidants disease-fighting vitamins, they are considered a Superfood that provide a good source of Vitamin A and C.

With an abundance of orange pumpkins available I was determined to create a few dishes. Never a big fan of pumpkin pie, I sought other options. On a recent October weekend, I returned to the quaint cottage, Bryn Teg, with Bronwyn with two recipes in hand- one for Curried Pumpkin Soup and the other, Best Ever Pumpkin Muffins.   In the charming kitchen with a view of an expansive landscape ablaze in color, I made the soup.  And I was reminded of an important lesson – not all recipes you find on the internet are always accurate.  As I questioned the four cups of water listed in the ingredients, I reluctantly decided to only add two cups and even then, the soup lacked flavor.

With Bronwyn at my side, we managed to salvage the recipe adding more spices and pumpkin to create the most delicious pumpkin soup, – a new version that is now ours to claim.   The muffins were gluten free as I substituted almond flour hoping it would not impact the outcome.  It worked.   They turned out lighter and delicious and for someone who does not typically like muffins – I loved these – a recipe from the Lovely Little Kitchen, modified slightly.

We roasted the seeds and ate them like candy.  When I returned home, I went immediately to the Common Roots Farmstand nearby and purchased several more pumpkins to make more roasted seeds.  I highly suggest that before you toss your pumpkins into the compost bin, extract the seeds and roast them!

Pumpkins continue to appear everywhere- loaded up on carts at markets, gracing the entrance to farm stands, on roadsides with handmade signs and on our stoops.  Recently at the market, I stood behind a lady who had one Jack-o Lantern on the grocery belt with 3 packages of stencils and tools to carve pumpkins.   I reminisced the days we carved spooky and goofy faces with our young children. Carving pumpkins is fun for all ages and I need to get a Jack- O Lantern before Halloween.

As we move closer to November, our brightly colored mums begin to fade, and our pumpkins become softer, I hope you will create something in your kitchen.   A hearty soup, muffins, a pumpkin cheesecake or roasted seeds are a few suggestions.  And beware that if a recipe doesn’t seem right- trust your instincts.   My attitude towards pumpkins has shifted – they are not just for décor and carving spooky faces but offer us a healthy colorful food to enjoy in a multitude of ways.

Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight, turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends!

-Laurie Caswell Burke

Posted: 10-27-2019

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“Favorite Cookbook Contest” from the last blog post. And the winner is…Kelly Austin!

As I approached the last day of the farm stand that had become a frequent “go to” all summer and autumn I was at a loss. I had been seeing the bright yellow signs on the roadside that said November 24 –LAST DAY, but I was in denial. Common Roots, (www.commonroots.org) a farm stand and CSA, located off Spear Street at the intersection of Allen Road in South Burlington had become part of my weekly ritual. Where would I buy my vegetables, eggs, garlic, fresh local meat…? I also believed strongly in their mission which supports local food systems and provides food security for families and schools by fostering the relationships among farmers, educators, and the wider community.

The Friday before the pending closure for the season, my dear friend, Janet who lives in Boston made a surprise to visit to my house. I shared my disappointment with her. Her response.
“Let’s go together tomorrow and we’ll make it fun!” So off we went to Common Roots- a mile from my home to a place where farmers grow fresh organic produce in surrounding fields and also source eggs, cheese, Kombucha, meats, pickled green beans and more. It was chilly inside the charming little farm shop and there wasn’t much left on the shelves. Brown paper bags filled with Thanksgiving shares for CSA members were crowded together on a center table, waiting to be picked up. We grabbed our canvas bags and managed to fill them to the brim, as I explained to Janet that all summer and fall these shelves had been brimming local food from the fields. As we left, she patted me on the back with a you’ll be fine. Spring will return soon enough. HA! And doesn’t Vermont have Winter Farmers markets?

I imagine that many of you have felt similar feelings putting gardens to bed, bidding farewell to local farm stands and the local Farmers Markets. We have been so use to abundant locally grown food through - out the summer and autumn months, however the transition to late fall and winter isn’t always easy.

Fortunate for Vermonters there are over 18 Farmers Markets scattered around our state that offer abundant opportunities to find food, fun and much more. As December rolled in I suggested to Bronwyn that we visit our local Burlington Farmers market at the UVM Davis Center with anticipation of finding some good produce, and some ideas for holiday shopping. We found so much more. First, the parking was FREE!

And as we descended the stairs to the atrium level of the Davis Center, there was lively music playing and a wonderful array of tables filled to the brim with vegetables, cheese, coffee, hot chocolate, artisan crafts and more. Folks were having convivial conversations. This was clearly a happening place that I immediately knew I would be visiting all winter long.

We did a first blush walk through and on our second go I think we had almost parted with our money at every booth and had some special conversations with the vendors. We left with Orb Weaver Cheese, Specialty mushrooms, squash, the most beautiful eggs, kale, beets, soft cows cheese and an adorable hand carved ornament. It was so much fun. And to top it all off we shared the most delicious hot chocolate on the planet from a talented local chocolate maker.

What I found interesting was the stories these farmers and vendors shared with us. The scrumptious food and beautiful creative artisan goods reflected a sincere passion for their work. Their positive energy was contagious.

The Burlington Farmers market will run every Saturday between now and Christmas from 10am-2pm, and then once a month through April. If you live in Vermont, you can locate a Farmers Market near you by visiting -www.nofavt.org/vtfarmersmarkets or call 802-434-4122. And my sense is that wherever you live – there are options near you!

We can all continue to enjoy seasonal local food thanks to our hard -working farmers!

Last Blog’s Cookbook contest was such fun and our very first entrant, Kelly Austin, was the winner- her favorite cookbook…. Half Baked Harvest by Tieghan Gerard. Sweet little Mabon got in on the fun and picked our winner! Congratulations Kelly and enjoy your prize, Cooking for One, by Judith Jones- a treasure of a cookbook! Thank you to everyone who shared their favorites with us!

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["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(22) "love-food-love-farmers" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-12-15 17:46:04" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-15 21:46:04" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5278" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#1124 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5229) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-18 18:58:50" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-18 22:58:50" ["post_content"]=> string(6990) " Who doesn’t own a cookbook?  In the age of social media,  one click can find you countless recipes from a wide range of sites including popular FOOD52, Epicurious, Allrecipes, Food Network, and Vermont based Eating Well.  I’ve also discovered clever named sites  like, Yummly,  Chowhound, and Spoonful.  Locating the perfect recipe from any one of these websites and others can be extremely helpful when you don’t have time to peruse your cookbook collection. These days people are on the go, and search on-line for finding almost everything.   However, despite the ease of on-line perfectly suitable recipes, which have a place in today’s world, I believe that there is always room for cookbooks. As we begin gearing up for the holidays, I thought a little seasonal COOKBOOK fun was in order.   It’s simple too!   Post the name of your favorite cookbook or two in the comment section on this blog and you will be entered into a drawing to win a cookbook- The Pleasures of Cooking for One by Judith Jones.  It’s a delightful read complete with helpful cooking tips and the recipes can be easily modified for more than one person. And if you want to add the name of your favorite recipe from that cookbook to your entry- even better! I love cookbooks!  They are constant companions in my kitchen. Over the past few decades, I have compiled three simple, spiral bound collections of recipes have been enjoyed by countless friends.  In 2004, I collaborated with two of my friends and created the third book, Atlantic, Pacific and Green Mountain Recipes. From Soup to Salmon Friends Share Favorites with Friends and Family.  My favorite of the three, complied with two  dear friends,  Anne from Boston’s south shore, and Andrea, from Seattle  shared some of our treasured recipes, from coast to coast.   Our collective friends and family have enjoyed our cookbooks - a regular “go to” for many. You can tell a lot about a person when your browse their cookbook collection.  Perhaps the largest and most diverse collection I have seen belonged to  Judith Jones’ collection  and graced the walls of every room in her NYC apartment where she had upwards of 1000 cookbooks.  In her beloved Vermont retreat Bryn Teg, shelves brim with almost as many.  After her death, a substantial portion of her collection was donated to Sterling College, located in Craftsbury Vermont-  and now able to be enjoyed by students, faculty and friends!  What a bountiful and beautiful legacy, made possible by Bronwyn Jones Dunne. As I browsed my personal cookbook collection, I discovered a 1943 edition of the Joy of Cooking tucked in a corner which hadn’t been touched in decades.  Old, worn and tattered, it is the most popular cookbook in America, but honestly compared to the current cookbooks, I find it somewhat plain and boring.  One of the United States most published cookbooks, it has been in print continuously since it was originally self published in 1936. Almost 20 million copies are in print today.  Well known books by Alice Waters, Ina Garten, Yotam Ottolenghi, Madhur Jaffrey, and Lidia Bastianich,  and an all time favorite,  Julia Childs, Mastering the Art of French Cooking…. among many more are front and center on my kitchen shelf. Recently I saw a very interesting film called Nothing Fancy, a documentary on Diana Kennedy, who is iconic for her numerous Mexican food cookbooks and influence on Mexican Cooking.  Bronwyn was the photographer for her author photo for her cookbook, The Tortilla Book in the 1980’s.  A charming and engaging film brought to Burlington by the Vermont International Film Festival, I highly recommend.   Kennedy put Mexican cooking on the map and at age 96,  is quite a character.  Vermont draws well known cookbook authors – during the past few years, Alice Waters and Jane Nathan are just a few that have visited here. Julia Child drew such a large crowd in St. Johnsbury 25 years ago that the event had to be relocated to the school gymnasium. Cookbooks today have evolved significantly over the decades.  They are often iconic and designed to be owned offering colorful and enticing photos, and text that engage you.  This new brand of cookbooks invite you to read them cover to cover, and not simply for following a recipe. Legendary Judith Jones put many of our current well known and famed cook book authors on the map because she believed in them.  We can be grateful for her ability to recognize talent and worked diligently to publish countless now well -known authors.  She penned several of her own including, Love ME Feed ME,   dedicated to her dog Mabon, and an autobiography,The Tenth Muse, as well as the aforementioned The Pleasures of Cooking for One. Earlier this fall, I traveled to Rochester Vermont for a wedding and visited one of my favorite haunts-Sandy’s Books and Bakery, an eclectic café /bookstore.  Next door they have a smaller space, The Bookery and Annex, that is brimming with an extensive used cookbook collection.  It’s worth a road trip to this sweet small Vermont town, located 50 miles south of Stowe. Peruse your cookbook collection and share with us your favorite cookbook. We will draw a name from all submissions on Monday, December 2nd, and share the list of favorites in our next Blog post. Feel free to name a favorite recipe as well. The Lost Kitchen by Erin French in on my holiday wish list.  You can never own too many cookbooks! Laurie Caswell Burke" ["post_title"]=> string(23) "Our Treasured Cookbooks" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(23) "our-treasured-cookbooks" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-11-29 08:35:57" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-29 12:35:57" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5229" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(2) "18" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#1128 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5217) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 08:56:19" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 12:56:19" ["post_content"]=> string(5936) " October brings a tapestry of fall colors across our Vermont landscapes with yellows, orange and red blazes.  And on almost every door stoop or walkway, pumpkins sit proudly clamoring to be noticed.  I’m always struck by the fact that it seems way too early to put pumpkins out as Halloween is thirty-one days away.  Won’t they be rotten by then?  As I watch more and more pumpkins all shapes and sizes grace front steps, walkways, and roadside stands, I’m determined not to give in this early - why rush things? A week ago, I caved, and bought our family pumpkin which now sits proudly on our front stoop. This year I went for a Cinderella pumpkin, which was one of the most popular and common pumpkins grown in France in the 1800’s.  It’s short and ornamental and bears little resemblance to your traditional taller and smoother Jack- o -Lantern pumpkin.  Cinderella pumpkins are known more for their beauty and the flesh is somewhat sweet and its flavor very subtle. After further research, I discovered that there are British pumpkins, Chinese, Indian and even Australian pumpkins- all somewhat different and something I had never given much thought. Every country appears to have their version of pumpkins. My favorite part of a pumpkin is hands down the seeds that you roast in the oven for about thirty to forty-five minutes until they are dry and then tossed with salt. I usually enjoy them this simple and easy way.  For a sweeter taste, you can toss the seeds with cinnamon and sugar. For a spicier flavor, toss with smoked paprika or a garam masala mix. Extracting the seeds from the slimy flesh and lining them in a single layer on a lightly oiled baking sheet can be messy but worth the work. Pumpkins are one of the most nutritional foods, loaded with anti-oxidants disease-fighting vitamins, they are considered a Superfood that provide a good source of Vitamin A and C. With an abundance of orange pumpkins available I was determined to create a few dishes. Never a big fan of pumpkin pie, I sought other options. On a recent October weekend, I returned to the quaint cottage, Bryn Teg, with Bronwyn with two recipes in hand- one for Curried Pumpkin Soup and the other, Best Ever Pumpkin Muffins.   In the charming kitchen with a view of an expansive landscape ablaze in color, I made the soup.  And I was reminded of an important lesson - not all recipes you find on the internet are always accurate.  As I questioned the four cups of water listed in the ingredients, I reluctantly decided to only add two cups and even then, the soup lacked flavor. With Bronwyn at my side, we managed to salvage the recipe adding more spices and pumpkin to create the most delicious pumpkin soup, - a new version that is now ours to claim.   The muffins were gluten free as I substituted almond flour hoping it would not impact the outcome.  It worked.   They turned out lighter and delicious and for someone who does not typically like muffins – I loved these – a recipe from the Lovely Little Kitchen, modified slightly. We roasted the seeds and ate them like candy.  When I returned home, I went immediately to the Common Roots Farmstand nearby and purchased several more pumpkins to make more roasted seeds.  I highly suggest that before you toss your pumpkins into the compost bin, extract the seeds and roast them! Pumpkins continue to appear everywhere- loaded up on carts at markets, gracing the entrance to farm stands, on roadsides with handmade signs and on our stoops.  Recently at the market, I stood behind a lady who had one Jack-o Lantern on the grocery belt with 3 packages of stencils and tools to carve pumpkins.   I reminisced the days we carved spooky and goofy faces with our young children. Carving pumpkins is fun for all ages and I need to get a Jack- O Lantern before Halloween. As we move closer to November, our brightly colored mums begin to fade, and our pumpkins become softer, I hope you will create something in your kitchen.   A hearty soup, muffins, a pumpkin cheesecake or roasted seeds are a few suggestions.  And beware that if a recipe doesn’t seem right- trust your instincts.   My attitude towards pumpkins has shifted – they are not just for décor and carving spooky faces but offer us a healthy colorful food to enjoy in a multitude of ways. Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight, turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends! -Laurie Caswell Burke" ["post_title"]=> string(32) "Pumpkins of all shapes and sizes" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(258) "Pumpkins are part of autumn tapestry, brightly colored and proudly clamoring to be noticed on stoops, walkways, and farmstand displays.  Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends! " ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(32) "pumpkins-of-all-shapes-and-sizes" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-10-31 17:04:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-10-31 21:04:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5217" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "6" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#1129 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5184) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 08:29:30" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 12:29:30" ["post_content"]=> string(4611) " When I asked a friend from India if she would give me some recipes, she generously made me mountains of delicious homemade Indian food.  But you know the adage, give a man fish vs teaching him to fish - I wanted to know how to make it myself! I asked her to join me in my new kitchen (yes, NEW! We just bought our first home!)  While teaching me to cook, she told me about her childhood in India, how strictly she and her friends do or don't follow tradition, and her family and friends.  I love hearing people's stories.  The world becomes both smaller and larger at the same time, and these are things you can't learn by just reading a recipe. And now, I have three new must-haves for my kitchen repertoire! #1. Cumin Seeds I regularly keep ground cumin on hand, but cumin seeds take it to a whole new level.  They are best used by heating oil in a pan, then stir in cumin seeds until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  It's that easy! Continue making your meal/following your recipe as planned.  Don't worry - there are no hard to chew seeds or husks in the end result. Don't know where to start? Try the basic curry recipe below! #2. Garam Masala Garam masala is a blend of many spices that are toasted prior to being ground together.  The name means "warming spices," not by adding spicy heat, but because in Ayurvedic medicine, these spices "warm" the body, meaning they are said to increase the metabolism. Typical spices included, though there are multiple variations, and this list is not comprehensive: coriander, cumin, cardamom pods, cloves, peppercorn, star anise, turmeric, and fennel. #3. Ginger-Garlic Paste Easy and delicious, this aromatic blend is perfect for cooking meat. To make - add equal parts fresh ginger and garlic, plus a sprinkle of turmeric, purée in a blender or food processor.  Store in an air tight container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. Chicken or Chickpea Curry Ingredients: 1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil 1 Onion 1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds 2 Tomatoes 1 1/2 lb Chicken or 1-2 cans garbanzo beans Garlic and Ginger Purée (see method above) Spices to taste: garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, and either red chili or cayenne if you like some heat Method: Heat olive oil in a large pan over medium heat.  While pan is heating, dice an onion.  Add cumin seeds to pan, and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Add onion and sprinkle with salt.  Stir occasionally until onion is cooked through (about 12 minutes).  While onion is cooking, dice two tomatoes and cut chicken into cubes.  Add tomato and stir gently for 30 seconds.  Add chicken or chickpeas and a generous spoonful of garlic and ginger puree.  Cook uncovered until "raw" smell is gone.  Cover and cook until almost done, stirring occasionally.  Uncover and stir in garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, cayenne, and salt to taste.  Cook until done.  Right before removing from heat, add small handful of chopped cilantro and stir until wilted. Jeera Rice (Coriander Rice) Ingredients: 1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil 1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds Handful Fresh Cilantro Salt to taste 1 cup rice 2 cup water or broth Method: Heat olive oil in a small pan.  Add cumin seeds and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Meanwhile, chop a small bunch of cilantro.  Add to cumin and oil and stir until wilted and coated with olive oil (about 15 seconds).  Add cumin and cilantro mix, plus salt to taste, to whatever vessel you plan to cook your rice with.  Prepare rice the same as you normally would (we use our pressure cooker)." ["post_title"]=> string(43) "Three New Must-Haves For Your Spice Cabinet" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(186) "Add spice to your life by including these three new flavors to your list of kitchen essentials. Inspired by Indian cooking, these ingredients are versatile and tasty - recipes included!" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(43) "three-new-must-haves-for-your-spice-cabinet" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 08:30:01" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 12:30:01" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5184" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "4" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#1207 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5177) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 07:26:48" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 11:26:48" ["post_content"]=> string(3807) "

Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel.

Don't turn your nose up just yet - if you love the combination of sweet & salty in your juicy BBQ Chicken, you'll love BBQ Eel.  Follow the recipe below! One of my favorite dishes at a sushi restaurant is Unagi, which is a fancy way of saying BBQ eel.  I was inspired to make my own after a colleague told me you can fish for eels in the rivers that feed into Lake Champlagne.  Someday I hope to catch my own, but the one used for this meal was a caught by my colleague. I was a squeamish child and young adult, squealing over spiders, bugs, and slimy things.  This squeamishness led to my vegetarian lifestyle, which I practiced for the better part of 10 years, because I struggled in associating my food with the animals the food came from.  You can read more about my food history here if it interests you.  Currently, I would describe my food lifestyle as holistic, non-wasting, DIY, and authentically/locally sourced. The 17 year-old girl in me would have a small heart attack to know she would grow into the woman I am today: butchering and grilling whole, slimy eels.  Eel is rich with omega-3 fatty acids, as well as other good for you vitamins and minerals.  If starting from scratch does not appeal to you, you can find prepared unagi in the frozen meat section of most Asian grocery stores. Find the comprehensive recipe list and serving suggestions here.

BBQ Eel

Ingredients: 1 lb Freshwater Eel 1 cup Unagi Sauce Method: Here is where I admit I am no butchering expert.  I watched some YouTube videos of prepping eel, but the people in the videos are VERY adept with a knife.  So...I took about 30 minutes to do a sloppier job of what the guys in the video did in about 60 seconds.  To prep, gut it, get the bones out, cut in half lengthwise, then cut into 4" steaks.  Leave the skin on - it will help while grilling. Start your grill and turn heat to medium.  While the grill is heating, skewer the steaks. Grill the Eel, skin side down, for three minutes.  Flip and grill another three minutes.  Turn the eel, baste with unagi sauce, and grill one minute skin side.  Flip again, baste with more unagi sauce, and grill one more minute. Until Next Time, Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(40) "dEELicious Flavors for your Summer Grill" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(246) "Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel. Fresh-caught from the rivers that feed into Lake Champlain, eel can be a delicious and unique addition to your summertime grill menu." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(40) "deelicious-flavors-for-your-summer-grill" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 07:26:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 11:26:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5177" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "2" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post_count"]=> int(5) ["current_post"]=> int(2) ["in_the_loop"]=> bool(true) ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#1128 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5217) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 08:56:19" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 12:56:19" ["post_content"]=> string(5936) " October brings a tapestry of fall colors across our Vermont landscapes with yellows, orange and red blazes.  And on almost every door stoop or walkway, pumpkins sit proudly clamoring to be noticed.  I’m always struck by the fact that it seems way too early to put pumpkins out as Halloween is thirty-one days away.  Won’t they be rotten by then?  As I watch more and more pumpkins all shapes and sizes grace front steps, walkways, and roadside stands, I’m determined not to give in this early - why rush things? A week ago, I caved, and bought our family pumpkin which now sits proudly on our front stoop. This year I went for a Cinderella pumpkin, which was one of the most popular and common pumpkins grown in France in the 1800’s.  It’s short and ornamental and bears little resemblance to your traditional taller and smoother Jack- o -Lantern pumpkin.  Cinderella pumpkins are known more for their beauty and the flesh is somewhat sweet and its flavor very subtle. After further research, I discovered that there are British pumpkins, Chinese, Indian and even Australian pumpkins- all somewhat different and something I had never given much thought. Every country appears to have their version of pumpkins. My favorite part of a pumpkin is hands down the seeds that you roast in the oven for about thirty to forty-five minutes until they are dry and then tossed with salt. I usually enjoy them this simple and easy way.  For a sweeter taste, you can toss the seeds with cinnamon and sugar. For a spicier flavor, toss with smoked paprika or a garam masala mix. Extracting the seeds from the slimy flesh and lining them in a single layer on a lightly oiled baking sheet can be messy but worth the work. Pumpkins are one of the most nutritional foods, loaded with anti-oxidants disease-fighting vitamins, they are considered a Superfood that provide a good source of Vitamin A and C. With an abundance of orange pumpkins available I was determined to create a few dishes. Never a big fan of pumpkin pie, I sought other options. On a recent October weekend, I returned to the quaint cottage, Bryn Teg, with Bronwyn with two recipes in hand- one for Curried Pumpkin Soup and the other, Best Ever Pumpkin Muffins.   In the charming kitchen with a view of an expansive landscape ablaze in color, I made the soup.  And I was reminded of an important lesson - not all recipes you find on the internet are always accurate.  As I questioned the four cups of water listed in the ingredients, I reluctantly decided to only add two cups and even then, the soup lacked flavor. With Bronwyn at my side, we managed to salvage the recipe adding more spices and pumpkin to create the most delicious pumpkin soup, - a new version that is now ours to claim.   The muffins were gluten free as I substituted almond flour hoping it would not impact the outcome.  It worked.   They turned out lighter and delicious and for someone who does not typically like muffins – I loved these – a recipe from the Lovely Little Kitchen, modified slightly. We roasted the seeds and ate them like candy.  When I returned home, I went immediately to the Common Roots Farmstand nearby and purchased several more pumpkins to make more roasted seeds.  I highly suggest that before you toss your pumpkins into the compost bin, extract the seeds and roast them! Pumpkins continue to appear everywhere- loaded up on carts at markets, gracing the entrance to farm stands, on roadsides with handmade signs and on our stoops.  Recently at the market, I stood behind a lady who had one Jack-o Lantern on the grocery belt with 3 packages of stencils and tools to carve pumpkins.   I reminisced the days we carved spooky and goofy faces with our young children. Carving pumpkins is fun for all ages and I need to get a Jack- O Lantern before Halloween. As we move closer to November, our brightly colored mums begin to fade, and our pumpkins become softer, I hope you will create something in your kitchen.   A hearty soup, muffins, a pumpkin cheesecake or roasted seeds are a few suggestions.  And beware that if a recipe doesn’t seem right- trust your instincts.   My attitude towards pumpkins has shifted – they are not just for décor and carving spooky faces but offer us a healthy colorful food to enjoy in a multitude of ways. Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight, turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends! -Laurie Caswell Burke" ["post_title"]=> string(32) "Pumpkins of all shapes and sizes" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(258) "Pumpkins are part of autumn tapestry, brightly colored and proudly clamoring to be noticed on stoops, walkways, and farmstand displays.  Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends! " ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(32) "pumpkins-of-all-shapes-and-sizes" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-10-31 17:04:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-10-31 21:04:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5217" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "6" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["comments"]=> array(18) { [0]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1215 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208752" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(7) "Bronwyn" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(35) "bronwyn@inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "73.38.163.183" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-24 17:42:07" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-24 21:42:07" ["comment_content"]=> string(232) "I already own, The Pleasures of Cooking for One, and it a delightful, fun cookbook. I have enjoyed many of the recipes, and they are even more special having had the great pleasure of knowing Judith Jones in her later years. Laurie" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [1]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1241 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208753" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(12) "Kelly Austin" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(23) "kellyaustin63@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.91.199.136" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-24 19:51:04" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-24 23:51:04" ["comment_content"]=> string(112) "Half Baked Harvest by Tiegan Gerard Given to me by a friend; everything I have made from it has been delicious!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [2]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1240 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208754" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(12) "Carole Bugge" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(14) "cbugge@aol.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(26) "http://www.celawrence.com/" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(11) "74.71.41.92" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-24 20:03:31" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-25 00:03:31" ["comment_content"]=> string(46) "My Facebook is Simca's Cuisine by Simone Beck." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [3]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1239 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208755" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(7) "Bronwyn" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(35) "bronwyn@inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.91.160.255" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-24 20:05:05" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-25 00:05:05" ["comment_content"]=> string(177) "Thank you, Kelly, for your submission to the drawing. I haven't heard of the cookbook but that's what's fun about sharing. Discovering new cookbooks is always a pleasure for me." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [4]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1238 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208756" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Angela Drexel" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(17) "angelalex1@me.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "74.75.237.30" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-24 21:01:20" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-25 01:01:20" ["comment_content"]=> string(337) "I'm not someone who reads cookbooks voraciously. However, one cookbook that has inspires me to cook is "With a Measure of Grace" - The Story and Recipes of a Small Town Restaurant. I love the integration of story, locality and food that all come together so beautifully at Hells Backbone Kitchen and in the book. The Mac N Cheese is yum!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [5]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1237 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208757" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(8) "Faith R." ["comment_author_email"]=> string(23) "faithrushford@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "73.149.89.243" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-26 16:41:01" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-26 20:41:01" ["comment_content"]=> string(188) "While I'm trending toward more online recipe browsing, I still find the Silver Palate to be one of my go-to cookbooks with some favorite and reliable recipes, like their Chili for a Crowd." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [6]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1236 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208758" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(6) "Laurie" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(25) "lcaswellburke@comcast.net" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "73.38.163.183" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-27 08:33:10" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-27 12:33:10" ["comment_content"]=> string(299) "I have SO many favorite cookbooks that I love to read and cook from. Like many of you have shared I also tend to go on-line and love the New York Times recipes and Food52. My current favorite cookbook is The Art of Simple Food by Alice Waters. It's beautifully designed with great cooking tips." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [7]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1235 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208759" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(4) "Lisa" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(22) "lisa.s.coney@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "66.31.132.153" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-27 19:23:12" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-27 23:23:12" ["comment_content"]=> string(187) "I try to choose a cookbook to cook from each month and have found (re-found) many favorites. My current favorite is Six Seasons, we love the flavors and how we're eating more vegetables." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [8]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1234 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208760" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(11) "Kelly peers" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(21) "kellypeers1@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "76.237.6.203" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-28 08:35:28" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-28 12:35:28" ["comment_content"]=> string(477) "This may sound like baloney but it’s not...one of my favorite cookbooks is “The World of Cheese” by Evan Jones. I bought it at the culinary institute’s swap meet in St. Helena at least 20 years ago. It has this cheesecake recipe. Which I have made at least 50 times. Which brought me to your website, hoping to find and pin it in case anything ever happens to this book! Happy thanksgiving...I’m making it again today! Bronwyn=cheesecake celebrity in this Napa house!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [9]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1233 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208761" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(7) "Bronwyn" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(35) "bronwyn@inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.91.160.255" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-28 12:22:44" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-28 16:22:44" ["comment_content"]=> string(570) "What a lovely Thanksgiving gift! Thank you, Kelly! I still think after all these years that the cheesecake recipe I contributed to my father's book is the best I've ever eaten. The story behind it involves a mother-in-law's cook and her recipe that didn't work for numerous tries until finally I got the baking time right. So, I really have to thank the fact that good cooks don't always "share" everything they know. I was forced to tweak this one until it really worked! I'm glad you enjoy my father's book on cheese -the first written by an American. He loved cheese!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [10]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1232 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208762" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Corrie Austin" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(21) "micalou1735@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "76.19.177.121" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-29 15:04:11" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-29 19:04:11" ["comment_content"]=> string(132) "My favorite is Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon. I actually posted my favorite recipe, winter root soup, on this blog already!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [11]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1231 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208763" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(7) "Bronwyn" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(35) "bronwyn@inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "73.38.163.183" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-12-01 10:17:29" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-01 14:17:29" ["comment_content"]=> string(192) "Thank you Corrie. Heading to the winter Farmers Market on Saturday and you have inspired me to purchase many root vegetables to make this soup- the winter solstice is on the horizon! Laurie" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [12]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1174 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208764" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(5) "Janet" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(19) "Nourishnp@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(14) "174.196.212.30" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-12-01 14:43:46" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-01 18:43:46" ["comment_content"]=> string(140) "Bakery Lane Soup Bowl Cookbook-was beloved restaurant in Middlebury, VT Beer cheese soup and chocolate cheesecake recipes are favorites." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [13]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1136 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208765" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(7) "Bronwyn" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(35) "bronwyn@inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "73.38.163.183" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-12-01 19:11:38" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-01 23:11:38" ["comment_content"]=> string(258) "Janet- you brought back so many memories of this beloved restaurant in Middlebury. I still have my copy but it is literally falling apart and been taped together countless times! Truly a lovely cookbook! Thank you dear friend for the memories.... Laurie" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [14]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1196 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208766" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(14) "Anne Schroeder" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "andi@andispeople.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(26) "http://www.andispeople.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "100.0.184.204" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-12-02 13:41:52" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-02 17:41:52" ["comment_content"]=> string(793) "Lovely article drawing attention to our favorite & cherished cookbook collections...how to choose one! It is so simple to google recipes based on what's available in the refrigerator, but curling up in a comfy chair with a favorite cookbook or two and perusing recipes before a cooking opportunity is an unmatched delight. I, too, love Judith Jones' Cooking for One, easy to double and a simple collection of delightful French cooking. I almost must add Julia Child's The Way to Cook -- and especially love the Reine de Saba -- I prescribe to Julia's philosophy -- 'everything in moderation' and 'if you're going to make one, make two and freeze'! Currently, I'm loving Christopher Kimball's Milk Street print and digital subscription (special $1/yr) for a glimpse at contemporary cooking!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [15]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1242 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208767" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(7) "Bronwyn" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(35) "bronwyn@inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "73.38.163.183" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-12-02 15:02:06" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-02 19:02:06" ["comment_content"]=> string(317) "Laurie Shares: Thank you Anne for this lovely sentiment as I know you adore cooking and I love that you use Judith Jone's cookbook that I gave you last year as a holiday gift! I think we will all benefit from your lovely post! You make a great point about freezing which can be very efficient which you always are!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [16]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1243 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208768" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(6) "Laurie" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(25) "lcaswellburke@comcast.net" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "73.38.163.183" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-12-06 10:24:40" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-06 14:24:40" ["comment_content"]=> string(264) "Laurie shares: Anne I also want to express my gratitude for the lovely Andi's People design that graced the cover of our cookbook. Adding it to this Blog post brought back so many memories. Andi's People cards and art are unique and so special. Thank you Anne!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [17]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1244 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208781" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(7) "Molly S" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(21) "Mollycsnell@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(14) "76.119.150.145" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-12-18 20:23:59" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-19 00:23:59" ["comment_content"]=> string(302) "I have recently been enjoying the Oh She Glows cookbook! Although I am not a vegan, I do appreciate the author’s creativity and ability to craft together elegant plant filled meals. One recipe I really enjoyed recently was the veggie enchiladas. Incredibly flavorful for not having any meat or dairy!" 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I have enjoyed many of the recipes, and they are even more special having had the great pleasure of knowing Judith Jones in her later years. Laurie" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [1]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1241 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208753" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(12) "Kelly Austin" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(23) "kellyaustin63@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.91.199.136" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-24 19:51:04" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-24 23:51:04" ["comment_content"]=> string(112) "Half Baked Harvest by Tiegan Gerard Given to me by a friend; everything I have made from it has been delicious!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [2]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1240 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208754" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(12) "Carole Bugge" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(14) "cbugge@aol.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(26) "http://www.celawrence.com/" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(11) "74.71.41.92" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-24 20:03:31" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-25 00:03:31" ["comment_content"]=> string(46) "My Facebook is Simca's Cuisine by Simone Beck." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [3]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1239 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208755" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(7) "Bronwyn" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(35) "bronwyn@inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.91.160.255" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-24 20:05:05" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-25 00:05:05" ["comment_content"]=> string(177) "Thank you, Kelly, for your submission to the drawing. I haven't heard of the cookbook but that's what's fun about sharing. Discovering new cookbooks is always a pleasure for me." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [4]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1238 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208756" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Angela Drexel" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(17) "angelalex1@me.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "74.75.237.30" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-24 21:01:20" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-25 01:01:20" ["comment_content"]=> string(337) "I'm not someone who reads cookbooks voraciously. However, one cookbook that has inspires me to cook is "With a Measure of Grace" - The Story and Recipes of a Small Town Restaurant. I love the integration of story, locality and food that all come together so beautifully at Hells Backbone Kitchen and in the book. The Mac N Cheese is yum!" 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["comment_author_email"]=> string(23) "faithrushford@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "73.149.89.243" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-26 16:41:01" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-26 20:41:01" ["comment_content"]=> string(188) "While I'm trending toward more online recipe browsing, I still find the Silver Palate to be one of my go-to cookbooks with some favorite and reliable recipes, like their Chili for a Crowd." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [6]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1236 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208758" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(6) "Laurie" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(25) "lcaswellburke@comcast.net" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "73.38.163.183" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-27 08:33:10" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-27 12:33:10" ["comment_content"]=> string(299) "I have SO many favorite cookbooks that I love to read and cook from. Like many of you have shared I also tend to go on-line and love the New York Times recipes and Food52. My current favorite cookbook is The Art of Simple Food by Alice Waters. It's beautifully designed with great cooking tips." 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My current favorite is Six Seasons, we love the flavors and how we're eating more vegetables." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [8]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1234 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208760" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(11) "Kelly peers" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(21) "kellypeers1@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "76.237.6.203" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-28 08:35:28" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-28 12:35:28" ["comment_content"]=> string(477) "This may sound like baloney but it’s not...one of my favorite cookbooks is “The World of Cheese” by Evan Jones. I bought it at the culinary institute’s swap meet in St. Helena at least 20 years ago. It has this cheesecake recipe. Which I have made at least 50 times. Which brought me to your website, hoping to find and pin it in case anything ever happens to this book! Happy thanksgiving...I’m making it again today! Bronwyn=cheesecake celebrity in this Napa house!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [9]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1233 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208761" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(7) "Bronwyn" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(35) "bronwyn@inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.91.160.255" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-28 12:22:44" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-28 16:22:44" ["comment_content"]=> string(570) "What a lovely Thanksgiving gift! Thank you, Kelly! I still think after all these years that the cheesecake recipe I contributed to my father's book is the best I've ever eaten. The story behind it involves a mother-in-law's cook and her recipe that didn't work for numerous tries until finally I got the baking time right. So, I really have to thank the fact that good cooks don't always "share" everything they know. I was forced to tweak this one until it really worked! I'm glad you enjoy my father's book on cheese -the first written by an American. He loved cheese!" 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I actually posted my favorite recipe, winter root soup, on this blog already!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [11]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1231 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208763" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(7) "Bronwyn" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(35) "bronwyn@inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "73.38.163.183" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-12-01 10:17:29" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-01 14:17:29" ["comment_content"]=> string(192) "Thank you Corrie. Heading to the winter Farmers Market on Saturday and you have inspired me to purchase many root vegetables to make this soup- the winter solstice is on the horizon! Laurie" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [12]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1174 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208764" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(5) "Janet" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(19) "Nourishnp@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(14) "174.196.212.30" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-12-01 14:43:46" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-01 18:43:46" ["comment_content"]=> string(140) "Bakery Lane Soup Bowl Cookbook-was beloved restaurant in Middlebury, VT Beer cheese soup and chocolate cheesecake recipes are favorites." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [13]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1136 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208765" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(7) "Bronwyn" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(35) "bronwyn@inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "73.38.163.183" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-12-01 19:11:38" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-01 23:11:38" ["comment_content"]=> string(258) "Janet- you brought back so many memories of this beloved restaurant in Middlebury. I still have my copy but it is literally falling apart and been taped together countless times! Truly a lovely cookbook! Thank you dear friend for the memories.... Laurie" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [14]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1196 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208766" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(14) "Anne Schroeder" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "andi@andispeople.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(26) "http://www.andispeople.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "100.0.184.204" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-12-02 13:41:52" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-02 17:41:52" ["comment_content"]=> string(793) "Lovely article drawing attention to our favorite & cherished cookbook collections...how to choose one! It is so simple to google recipes based on what's available in the refrigerator, but curling up in a comfy chair with a favorite cookbook or two and perusing recipes before a cooking opportunity is an unmatched delight. I, too, love Judith Jones' Cooking for One, easy to double and a simple collection of delightful French cooking. I almost must add Julia Child's The Way to Cook -- and especially love the Reine de Saba -- I prescribe to Julia's philosophy -- 'everything in moderation' and 'if you're going to make one, make two and freeze'! Currently, I'm loving Christopher Kimball's Milk Street print and digital subscription (special $1/yr) for a glimpse at contemporary cooking!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [15]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1242 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208767" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(7) "Bronwyn" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(35) "bronwyn@inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "73.38.163.183" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-12-02 15:02:06" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-02 19:02:06" ["comment_content"]=> string(317) "Laurie Shares: Thank you Anne for this lovely sentiment as I know you adore cooking and I love that you use Judith Jone's cookbook that I gave you last year as a holiday gift! I think we will all benefit from your lovely post! You make a great point about freezing which can be very efficient which you always are!" 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Adding it to this Blog post brought back so many memories. Andi's People cards and art are unique and so special. Thank you Anne!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [17]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1244 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208781" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5229" ["comment_author"]=> string(7) "Molly S" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(21) "Mollycsnell@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(14) "76.119.150.145" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-12-18 20:23:59" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-19 00:23:59" ["comment_content"]=> string(302) "I have recently been enjoying the Oh She Glows cookbook! Although I am not a vegan, I do appreciate the author’s creativity and ability to craft together elegant plant filled meals. One recipe I really enjoyed recently was the veggie enchiladas. Incredibly flavorful for not having any meat or dairy!" 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6 responses to “Pumpkins of all shapes and sizes”

  1. Kate Burke says:

    Great job! I loved the pumpkin soup.

  2. Thanks, Kate. We had a lot of fun “saving it” after the recipe glitch!

  3. Janet says:

    Send the soup to Boston, please. Yummmm.

  4. I love this article so much and all of the enthusiasm for the simple joys Autumn in New England that the pumpkin season brings! A stop at Lucky Finn’s for a Pumpkin Latte in Scituate MA has become routine twice a week until pumpkins fade into the new season…. Julia Child’s Baked in a Pumpkin Soup with luscious Gruyere and fresh breadcrumbs is a favorite — and freezes well too!
    Always love Laurie’s recipes and am enjoying this blog!

  5. Dear Anne, Thank you so much! And that pumpkin latte sounds really good!

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Three New Must-Haves For Your Spice Cabinet

When I asked a friend from India if she would give me some recipes, she generously made me mountains of delicious homemade Indian food.  But you know the adage, give a man fish vs teaching him to fish – I wanted to know how to make it myself!

I asked her to join me in my new kitchen (yes, NEW! We just bought our first home!)  While teaching me to cook, she told me about her childhood in India, how strictly she and her friends do or don’t follow tradition, and her family and friends.  I love hearing people’s stories.  The world becomes both smaller and larger at the same time, and these are things you can’t learn by just reading a recipe.

And now, I have three new must-haves for my kitchen repertoire!

#1. Cumin Seeds

I regularly keep ground cumin on hand, but cumin seeds take it to a whole new level.  They are best used by heating oil in a pan, then stir in cumin seeds until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  It’s that easy! Continue making your meal/following your recipe as planned.  Don’t worry – there are no hard to chew seeds or husks in the end result.

Don’t know where to start? Try the basic curry recipe below!

#2. Garam Masala

Garam masala is a blend of many spices that are toasted prior to being ground together.  The name means “warming spices,” not by adding spicy heat, but because in Ayurvedic medicine, these spices “warm” the body, meaning they are said to increase the metabolism.

Typical spices included, though there are multiple variations, and this list is not comprehensive: coriander, cumin, cardamom pods, cloves, peppercorn, star anise, turmeric, and fennel.

#3. Ginger-Garlic Paste

Easy and delicious, this aromatic blend is perfect for cooking meat.

To make – add equal parts fresh ginger and garlic, plus a sprinkle of turmeric, purée in a blender or food processor.  Store in an air tight container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.

Chicken or Chickpea Curry

Ingredients:

1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil

1 Onion

1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds

2 Tomatoes

1 1/2 lb Chicken or 1-2 cans garbanzo beans

Garlic and Ginger Purée (see method above)

Spices to taste: garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, and either red chili or cayenne if you like some heat

Method:

Heat olive oil in a large pan over medium heat.  While pan is heating, dice an onion.  Add cumin seeds to pan, and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Add onion and sprinkle with salt.  Stir occasionally until onion is cooked through (about 12 minutes).  While onion is cooking, dice two tomatoes and cut chicken into cubes.  Add tomato and stir gently for 30 seconds.  Add chicken or chickpeas and a generous spoonful of garlic and ginger puree.  Cook uncovered until “raw” smell is gone.  Cover and cook until almost done, stirring occasionally.  Uncover and stir in garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, cayenne, and salt to taste.  Cook until done.  Right before removing from heat, add small handful of chopped cilantro and stir until wilted.

Jeera Rice (Coriander Rice)

Ingredients:

1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil

1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds

Handful Fresh Cilantro

Salt to taste

1 cup rice

2 cup water or broth

Method:

Heat olive oil in a small pan.  Add cumin seeds and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Meanwhile, chop a small bunch of cilantro.  Add to cumin and oil and stir until wilted and coated with olive oil (about 15 seconds).  Add cumin and cilantro mix, plus salt to taste, to whatever vessel you plan to cook your rice with.  Prepare rice the same as you normally would (we use our pressure cooker).

Posted: 7-14-2019

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“Favorite Cookbook Contest” from the last blog post. And the winner is…Kelly Austin!

As I approached the last day of the farm stand that had become a frequent “go to” all summer and autumn I was at a loss. I had been seeing the bright yellow signs on the roadside that said November 24 –LAST DAY, but I was in denial. Common Roots, (www.commonroots.org) a farm stand and CSA, located off Spear Street at the intersection of Allen Road in South Burlington had become part of my weekly ritual. Where would I buy my vegetables, eggs, garlic, fresh local meat…? I also believed strongly in their mission which supports local food systems and provides food security for families and schools by fostering the relationships among farmers, educators, and the wider community.

The Friday before the pending closure for the season, my dear friend, Janet who lives in Boston made a surprise to visit to my house. I shared my disappointment with her. Her response.
“Let’s go together tomorrow and we’ll make it fun!” So off we went to Common Roots- a mile from my home to a place where farmers grow fresh organic produce in surrounding fields and also source eggs, cheese, Kombucha, meats, pickled green beans and more. It was chilly inside the charming little farm shop and there wasn’t much left on the shelves. Brown paper bags filled with Thanksgiving shares for CSA members were crowded together on a center table, waiting to be picked up. We grabbed our canvas bags and managed to fill them to the brim, as I explained to Janet that all summer and fall these shelves had been brimming local food from the fields. As we left, she patted me on the back with a you’ll be fine. Spring will return soon enough. HA! And doesn’t Vermont have Winter Farmers markets?

I imagine that many of you have felt similar feelings putting gardens to bed, bidding farewell to local farm stands and the local Farmers Markets. We have been so use to abundant locally grown food through - out the summer and autumn months, however the transition to late fall and winter isn’t always easy.

Fortunate for Vermonters there are over 18 Farmers Markets scattered around our state that offer abundant opportunities to find food, fun and much more. As December rolled in I suggested to Bronwyn that we visit our local Burlington Farmers market at the UVM Davis Center with anticipation of finding some good produce, and some ideas for holiday shopping. We found so much more. First, the parking was FREE!

And as we descended the stairs to the atrium level of the Davis Center, there was lively music playing and a wonderful array of tables filled to the brim with vegetables, cheese, coffee, hot chocolate, artisan crafts and more. Folks were having convivial conversations. This was clearly a happening place that I immediately knew I would be visiting all winter long.

We did a first blush walk through and on our second go I think we had almost parted with our money at every booth and had some special conversations with the vendors. We left with Orb Weaver Cheese, Specialty mushrooms, squash, the most beautiful eggs, kale, beets, soft cows cheese and an adorable hand carved ornament. It was so much fun. And to top it all off we shared the most delicious hot chocolate on the planet from a talented local chocolate maker.

What I found interesting was the stories these farmers and vendors shared with us. The scrumptious food and beautiful creative artisan goods reflected a sincere passion for their work. Their positive energy was contagious.

The Burlington Farmers market will run every Saturday between now and Christmas from 10am-2pm, and then once a month through April. If you live in Vermont, you can locate a Farmers Market near you by visiting -www.nofavt.org/vtfarmersmarkets or call 802-434-4122. And my sense is that wherever you live – there are options near you!

We can all continue to enjoy seasonal local food thanks to our hard -working farmers!

Last Blog’s Cookbook contest was such fun and our very first entrant, Kelly Austin, was the winner- her favorite cookbook…. Half Baked Harvest by Tieghan Gerard. Sweet little Mabon got in on the fun and picked our winner! Congratulations Kelly and enjoy your prize, Cooking for One, by Judith Jones- a treasure of a cookbook! Thank you to everyone who shared their favorites with us!

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As we begin gearing up for the holidays, I thought a little seasonal COOKBOOK fun was in order.   It’s simple too!   Post the name of your favorite cookbook or two in the comment section on this blog and you will be entered into a drawing to win a cookbook- The Pleasures of Cooking for One by Judith Jones.  It’s a delightful read complete with helpful cooking tips and the recipes can be easily modified for more than one person. And if you want to add the name of your favorite recipe from that cookbook to your entry- even better! I love cookbooks!  They are constant companions in my kitchen. Over the past few decades, I have compiled three simple, spiral bound collections of recipes have been enjoyed by countless friends.  In 2004, I collaborated with two of my friends and created the third book, Atlantic, Pacific and Green Mountain Recipes. From Soup to Salmon Friends Share Favorites with Friends and Family.  My favorite of the three, complied with two  dear friends,  Anne from Boston’s south shore, and Andrea, from Seattle  shared some of our treasured recipes, from coast to coast.   Our collective friends and family have enjoyed our cookbooks - a regular “go to” for many. You can tell a lot about a person when your browse their cookbook collection.  Perhaps the largest and most diverse collection I have seen belonged to  Judith Jones’ collection  and graced the walls of every room in her NYC apartment where she had upwards of 1000 cookbooks.  In her beloved Vermont retreat Bryn Teg, shelves brim with almost as many.  After her death, a substantial portion of her collection was donated to Sterling College, located in Craftsbury Vermont-  and now able to be enjoyed by students, faculty and friends!  What a bountiful and beautiful legacy, made possible by Bronwyn Jones Dunne. As I browsed my personal cookbook collection, I discovered a 1943 edition of the Joy of Cooking tucked in a corner which hadn’t been touched in decades.  Old, worn and tattered, it is the most popular cookbook in America, but honestly compared to the current cookbooks, I find it somewhat plain and boring.  One of the United States most published cookbooks, it has been in print continuously since it was originally self published in 1936. Almost 20 million copies are in print today.  Well known books by Alice Waters, Ina Garten, Yotam Ottolenghi, Madhur Jaffrey, and Lidia Bastianich,  and an all time favorite,  Julia Childs, Mastering the Art of French Cooking…. among many more are front and center on my kitchen shelf. Recently I saw a very interesting film called Nothing Fancy, a documentary on Diana Kennedy, who is iconic for her numerous Mexican food cookbooks and influence on Mexican Cooking.  Bronwyn was the photographer for her author photo for her cookbook, The Tortilla Book in the 1980’s.  A charming and engaging film brought to Burlington by the Vermont International Film Festival, I highly recommend.   Kennedy put Mexican cooking on the map and at age 96,  is quite a character.  Vermont draws well known cookbook authors – during the past few years, Alice Waters and Jane Nathan are just a few that have visited here. Julia Child drew such a large crowd in St. Johnsbury 25 years ago that the event had to be relocated to the school gymnasium. Cookbooks today have evolved significantly over the decades.  They are often iconic and designed to be owned offering colorful and enticing photos, and text that engage you.  This new brand of cookbooks invite you to read them cover to cover, and not simply for following a recipe. Legendary Judith Jones put many of our current well known and famed cook book authors on the map because she believed in them.  We can be grateful for her ability to recognize talent and worked diligently to publish countless now well -known authors.  She penned several of her own including, Love ME Feed ME,   dedicated to her dog Mabon, and an autobiography,The Tenth Muse, as well as the aforementioned The Pleasures of Cooking for One. Earlier this fall, I traveled to Rochester Vermont for a wedding and visited one of my favorite haunts-Sandy’s Books and Bakery, an eclectic café /bookstore.  Next door they have a smaller space, The Bookery and Annex, that is brimming with an extensive used cookbook collection.  It’s worth a road trip to this sweet small Vermont town, located 50 miles south of Stowe. Peruse your cookbook collection and share with us your favorite cookbook. We will draw a name from all submissions on Monday, December 2nd, and share the list of favorites in our next Blog post. Feel free to name a favorite recipe as well. The Lost Kitchen by Erin French in on my holiday wish list.  You can never own too many cookbooks! Laurie Caswell Burke" ["post_title"]=> string(23) "Our Treasured Cookbooks" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(23) "our-treasured-cookbooks" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-11-29 08:35:57" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-29 12:35:57" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5229" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(2) "18" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#1128 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5217) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 08:56:19" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 12:56:19" ["post_content"]=> string(5936) " October brings a tapestry of fall colors across our Vermont landscapes with yellows, orange and red blazes.  And on almost every door stoop or walkway, pumpkins sit proudly clamoring to be noticed.  I’m always struck by the fact that it seems way too early to put pumpkins out as Halloween is thirty-one days away.  Won’t they be rotten by then?  As I watch more and more pumpkins all shapes and sizes grace front steps, walkways, and roadside stands, I’m determined not to give in this early - why rush things? A week ago, I caved, and bought our family pumpkin which now sits proudly on our front stoop. This year I went for a Cinderella pumpkin, which was one of the most popular and common pumpkins grown in France in the 1800’s.  It’s short and ornamental and bears little resemblance to your traditional taller and smoother Jack- o -Lantern pumpkin.  Cinderella pumpkins are known more for their beauty and the flesh is somewhat sweet and its flavor very subtle. After further research, I discovered that there are British pumpkins, Chinese, Indian and even Australian pumpkins- all somewhat different and something I had never given much thought. Every country appears to have their version of pumpkins. My favorite part of a pumpkin is hands down the seeds that you roast in the oven for about thirty to forty-five minutes until they are dry and then tossed with salt. I usually enjoy them this simple and easy way.  For a sweeter taste, you can toss the seeds with cinnamon and sugar. For a spicier flavor, toss with smoked paprika or a garam masala mix. Extracting the seeds from the slimy flesh and lining them in a single layer on a lightly oiled baking sheet can be messy but worth the work. Pumpkins are one of the most nutritional foods, loaded with anti-oxidants disease-fighting vitamins, they are considered a Superfood that provide a good source of Vitamin A and C. With an abundance of orange pumpkins available I was determined to create a few dishes. Never a big fan of pumpkin pie, I sought other options. On a recent October weekend, I returned to the quaint cottage, Bryn Teg, with Bronwyn with two recipes in hand- one for Curried Pumpkin Soup and the other, Best Ever Pumpkin Muffins.   In the charming kitchen with a view of an expansive landscape ablaze in color, I made the soup.  And I was reminded of an important lesson - not all recipes you find on the internet are always accurate.  As I questioned the four cups of water listed in the ingredients, I reluctantly decided to only add two cups and even then, the soup lacked flavor. With Bronwyn at my side, we managed to salvage the recipe adding more spices and pumpkin to create the most delicious pumpkin soup, - a new version that is now ours to claim.   The muffins were gluten free as I substituted almond flour hoping it would not impact the outcome.  It worked.   They turned out lighter and delicious and for someone who does not typically like muffins – I loved these – a recipe from the Lovely Little Kitchen, modified slightly. We roasted the seeds and ate them like candy.  When I returned home, I went immediately to the Common Roots Farmstand nearby and purchased several more pumpkins to make more roasted seeds.  I highly suggest that before you toss your pumpkins into the compost bin, extract the seeds and roast them! Pumpkins continue to appear everywhere- loaded up on carts at markets, gracing the entrance to farm stands, on roadsides with handmade signs and on our stoops.  Recently at the market, I stood behind a lady who had one Jack-o Lantern on the grocery belt with 3 packages of stencils and tools to carve pumpkins.   I reminisced the days we carved spooky and goofy faces with our young children. Carving pumpkins is fun for all ages and I need to get a Jack- O Lantern before Halloween. As we move closer to November, our brightly colored mums begin to fade, and our pumpkins become softer, I hope you will create something in your kitchen.   A hearty soup, muffins, a pumpkin cheesecake or roasted seeds are a few suggestions.  And beware that if a recipe doesn’t seem right- trust your instincts.   My attitude towards pumpkins has shifted – they are not just for décor and carving spooky faces but offer us a healthy colorful food to enjoy in a multitude of ways. Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight, turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends! -Laurie Caswell Burke" ["post_title"]=> string(32) "Pumpkins of all shapes and sizes" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(258) "Pumpkins are part of autumn tapestry, brightly colored and proudly clamoring to be noticed on stoops, walkways, and farmstand displays.  Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends! " ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(32) "pumpkins-of-all-shapes-and-sizes" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-10-31 17:04:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-10-31 21:04:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5217" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "6" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#1129 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5184) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 08:29:30" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 12:29:30" ["post_content"]=> string(4611) " When I asked a friend from India if she would give me some recipes, she generously made me mountains of delicious homemade Indian food.  But you know the adage, give a man fish vs teaching him to fish - I wanted to know how to make it myself! I asked her to join me in my new kitchen (yes, NEW! We just bought our first home!)  While teaching me to cook, she told me about her childhood in India, how strictly she and her friends do or don't follow tradition, and her family and friends.  I love hearing people's stories.  The world becomes both smaller and larger at the same time, and these are things you can't learn by just reading a recipe. And now, I have three new must-haves for my kitchen repertoire! #1. Cumin Seeds I regularly keep ground cumin on hand, but cumin seeds take it to a whole new level.  They are best used by heating oil in a pan, then stir in cumin seeds until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  It's that easy! Continue making your meal/following your recipe as planned.  Don't worry - there are no hard to chew seeds or husks in the end result. Don't know where to start? Try the basic curry recipe below! #2. Garam Masala Garam masala is a blend of many spices that are toasted prior to being ground together.  The name means "warming spices," not by adding spicy heat, but because in Ayurvedic medicine, these spices "warm" the body, meaning they are said to increase the metabolism. Typical spices included, though there are multiple variations, and this list is not comprehensive: coriander, cumin, cardamom pods, cloves, peppercorn, star anise, turmeric, and fennel. #3. Ginger-Garlic Paste Easy and delicious, this aromatic blend is perfect for cooking meat. To make - add equal parts fresh ginger and garlic, plus a sprinkle of turmeric, purée in a blender or food processor.  Store in an air tight container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. Chicken or Chickpea Curry Ingredients: 1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil 1 Onion 1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds 2 Tomatoes 1 1/2 lb Chicken or 1-2 cans garbanzo beans Garlic and Ginger Purée (see method above) Spices to taste: garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, and either red chili or cayenne if you like some heat Method: Heat olive oil in a large pan over medium heat.  While pan is heating, dice an onion.  Add cumin seeds to pan, and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Add onion and sprinkle with salt.  Stir occasionally until onion is cooked through (about 12 minutes).  While onion is cooking, dice two tomatoes and cut chicken into cubes.  Add tomato and stir gently for 30 seconds.  Add chicken or chickpeas and a generous spoonful of garlic and ginger puree.  Cook uncovered until "raw" smell is gone.  Cover and cook until almost done, stirring occasionally.  Uncover and stir in garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, cayenne, and salt to taste.  Cook until done.  Right before removing from heat, add small handful of chopped cilantro and stir until wilted. Jeera Rice (Coriander Rice) Ingredients: 1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil 1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds Handful Fresh Cilantro Salt to taste 1 cup rice 2 cup water or broth Method: Heat olive oil in a small pan.  Add cumin seeds and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Meanwhile, chop a small bunch of cilantro.  Add to cumin and oil and stir until wilted and coated with olive oil (about 15 seconds).  Add cumin and cilantro mix, plus salt to taste, to whatever vessel you plan to cook your rice with.  Prepare rice the same as you normally would (we use our pressure cooker)." ["post_title"]=> string(43) "Three New Must-Haves For Your Spice Cabinet" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(186) "Add spice to your life by including these three new flavors to your list of kitchen essentials. Inspired by Indian cooking, these ingredients are versatile and tasty - recipes included!" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(43) "three-new-must-haves-for-your-spice-cabinet" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 08:30:01" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 12:30:01" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5184" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "4" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#1207 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5177) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 07:26:48" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 11:26:48" ["post_content"]=> string(3807) "

Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel.

Don't turn your nose up just yet - if you love the combination of sweet & salty in your juicy BBQ Chicken, you'll love BBQ Eel.  Follow the recipe below! One of my favorite dishes at a sushi restaurant is Unagi, which is a fancy way of saying BBQ eel.  I was inspired to make my own after a colleague told me you can fish for eels in the rivers that feed into Lake Champlagne.  Someday I hope to catch my own, but the one used for this meal was a caught by my colleague. I was a squeamish child and young adult, squealing over spiders, bugs, and slimy things.  This squeamishness led to my vegetarian lifestyle, which I practiced for the better part of 10 years, because I struggled in associating my food with the animals the food came from.  You can read more about my food history here if it interests you.  Currently, I would describe my food lifestyle as holistic, non-wasting, DIY, and authentically/locally sourced. The 17 year-old girl in me would have a small heart attack to know she would grow into the woman I am today: butchering and grilling whole, slimy eels.  Eel is rich with omega-3 fatty acids, as well as other good for you vitamins and minerals.  If starting from scratch does not appeal to you, you can find prepared unagi in the frozen meat section of most Asian grocery stores. Find the comprehensive recipe list and serving suggestions here.

BBQ Eel

Ingredients: 1 lb Freshwater Eel 1 cup Unagi Sauce Method: Here is where I admit I am no butchering expert.  I watched some YouTube videos of prepping eel, but the people in the videos are VERY adept with a knife.  So...I took about 30 minutes to do a sloppier job of what the guys in the video did in about 60 seconds.  To prep, gut it, get the bones out, cut in half lengthwise, then cut into 4" steaks.  Leave the skin on - it will help while grilling. Start your grill and turn heat to medium.  While the grill is heating, skewer the steaks. Grill the Eel, skin side down, for three minutes.  Flip and grill another three minutes.  Turn the eel, baste with unagi sauce, and grill one minute skin side.  Flip again, baste with more unagi sauce, and grill one more minute. Until Next Time, Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(40) "dEELicious Flavors for your Summer Grill" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(246) "Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel. Fresh-caught from the rivers that feed into Lake Champlain, eel can be a delicious and unique addition to your summertime grill menu." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(40) "deelicious-flavors-for-your-summer-grill" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 07:26:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 11:26:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5177" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "2" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post_count"]=> int(5) ["current_post"]=> int(3) ["in_the_loop"]=> bool(true) ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#1129 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5184) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 08:29:30" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 12:29:30" ["post_content"]=> string(4611) " When I asked a friend from India if she would give me some recipes, she generously made me mountains of delicious homemade Indian food.  But you know the adage, give a man fish vs teaching him to fish - I wanted to know how to make it myself! I asked her to join me in my new kitchen (yes, NEW! We just bought our first home!)  While teaching me to cook, she told me about her childhood in India, how strictly she and her friends do or don't follow tradition, and her family and friends.  I love hearing people's stories.  The world becomes both smaller and larger at the same time, and these are things you can't learn by just reading a recipe. And now, I have three new must-haves for my kitchen repertoire! #1. Cumin Seeds I regularly keep ground cumin on hand, but cumin seeds take it to a whole new level.  They are best used by heating oil in a pan, then stir in cumin seeds until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  It's that easy! Continue making your meal/following your recipe as planned.  Don't worry - there are no hard to chew seeds or husks in the end result. Don't know where to start? Try the basic curry recipe below! #2. Garam Masala Garam masala is a blend of many spices that are toasted prior to being ground together.  The name means "warming spices," not by adding spicy heat, but because in Ayurvedic medicine, these spices "warm" the body, meaning they are said to increase the metabolism. Typical spices included, though there are multiple variations, and this list is not comprehensive: coriander, cumin, cardamom pods, cloves, peppercorn, star anise, turmeric, and fennel. #3. Ginger-Garlic Paste Easy and delicious, this aromatic blend is perfect for cooking meat. To make - add equal parts fresh ginger and garlic, plus a sprinkle of turmeric, purée in a blender or food processor.  Store in an air tight container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. Chicken or Chickpea Curry Ingredients: 1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil 1 Onion 1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds 2 Tomatoes 1 1/2 lb Chicken or 1-2 cans garbanzo beans Garlic and Ginger Purée (see method above) Spices to taste: garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, and either red chili or cayenne if you like some heat Method: Heat olive oil in a large pan over medium heat.  While pan is heating, dice an onion.  Add cumin seeds to pan, and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Add onion and sprinkle with salt.  Stir occasionally until onion is cooked through (about 12 minutes).  While onion is cooking, dice two tomatoes and cut chicken into cubes.  Add tomato and stir gently for 30 seconds.  Add chicken or chickpeas and a generous spoonful of garlic and ginger puree.  Cook uncovered until "raw" smell is gone.  Cover and cook until almost done, stirring occasionally.  Uncover and stir in garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, cayenne, and salt to taste.  Cook until done.  Right before removing from heat, add small handful of chopped cilantro and stir until wilted. Jeera Rice (Coriander Rice) Ingredients: 1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil 1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds Handful Fresh Cilantro Salt to taste 1 cup rice 2 cup water or broth Method: Heat olive oil in a small pan.  Add cumin seeds and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Meanwhile, chop a small bunch of cilantro.  Add to cumin and oil and stir until wilted and coated with olive oil (about 15 seconds).  Add cumin and cilantro mix, plus salt to taste, to whatever vessel you plan to cook your rice with.  Prepare rice the same as you normally would (we use our pressure cooker)." ["post_title"]=> string(43) "Three New Must-Haves For Your Spice Cabinet" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(186) "Add spice to your life by including these three new flavors to your list of kitchen essentials. Inspired by Indian cooking, these ingredients are versatile and tasty - recipes included!" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(43) "three-new-must-haves-for-your-spice-cabinet" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 08:30:01" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 12:30:01" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5184" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "4" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["comments"]=> array(6) { [0]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1326 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208746" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5217" ["comment_author"]=> string(10) "Kate Burke" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "burke_k1@denison.edu" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "73.38.163.183" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 18:47:01" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 22:47:01" ["comment_content"]=> string(36) "Great job! I loved the pumpkin soup." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [1]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1324 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208747" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5217" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Bronwyn Dunne" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "bronwyndunne@mac.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(34) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.91.160.255" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 19:25:56" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 23:25:56" ["comment_content"]=> string(70) "Thanks, Kate. We had a lot of fun "saving it" after the recipe glitch!" 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Yummmm." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(1) { [208749]=> object(WP_Comment)#1333 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208749" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5217" ["comment_author"]=> string(6) "Laurie" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(35) "bronwyn@inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.91.160.255" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-04 20:14:49" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-05 00:14:49" ["comment_content"]=> string(47) "Laurie says: Good reason to come to Vermont!!!" 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A stop at Lucky Finn’s for a Pumpkin Latte in Scituate MA has become routine twice a week until pumpkins fade into the new season.... Julia Child’s Baked in a Pumpkin Soup with luscious Gruyere and fresh breadcrumbs is a favorite — and freezes well too! Always love Laurie’s recipes and am enjoying this blog!" 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And that pumpkin latte sounds really good!" 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I loved the pumpkin soup." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [1]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1324 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208747" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5217" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Bronwyn Dunne" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "bronwyndunne@mac.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(34) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.91.160.255" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 19:25:56" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 23:25:56" ["comment_content"]=> string(70) "Thanks, Kate. We had a lot of fun "saving it" after the recipe glitch!" 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Yummmm." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(1) { [208749]=> object(WP_Comment)#1333 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208749" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5217" ["comment_author"]=> string(6) "Laurie" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(35) "bronwyn@inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.91.160.255" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-04 20:14:49" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-05 00:14:49" ["comment_content"]=> string(47) "Laurie says: Good reason to come to Vermont!!!" 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A stop at Lucky Finn’s for a Pumpkin Latte in Scituate MA has become routine twice a week until pumpkins fade into the new season.... Julia Child’s Baked in a Pumpkin Soup with luscious Gruyere and fresh breadcrumbs is a favorite — and freezes well too! Always love Laurie’s recipes and am enjoying this blog!" 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And that pumpkin latte sounds really good!" 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4 responses to “Three New Must-Haves For Your Spice Cabinet”

  1. This is a great primer on how to cook Indian cuisine and I remember when -many years ago- I invited a neighbor to join me in my newish kitchen so she and I could make an Indian curry together. It was my Indian friend who taught me that curry is not just a single powder that comes out of jar but an assortment of spices….toasting them in a hot pan filled my kitchen with the essence of her native country…such a treat!

    • Corrie Austin says:

      Hello Bronwyn!
      I only recently, a little over a year ago, learned the same about curry not being a single spice. It also helps explain why there is such variance in the flavor. How fun we both have such pivotal experiences in our new kitchens!
      Take care,
      Corrie

  2. Maria Brandriff says:

    When I was in India, I learned that garam masala means “merchant’s spice mix”, so in essence every merchant has his own blend, hence another reason for the variations.

  3. Kellie Kutkey says:

    Ok, if I let the cumin seeds roast in my skillet with oil, then I can use the seeds just like the powder? That sounds amazing!
    Thanks 🙂

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dEELicious Flavors for your Summer Grill

Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel.

Don’t turn your nose up just yet – if you love the combination of sweet & salty in your juicy BBQ Chicken, you’ll love BBQ Eel.  Follow the recipe below!

One of my favorite dishes at a sushi restaurant is Unagi, which is a fancy way of saying BBQ eel.  I was inspired to make my own after a colleague told me you can fish for eels in the rivers that feed into Lake Champlagne.  Someday I hope to catch my own, but the one used for this meal was a caught by my colleague.

I was a squeamish child and young adult, squealing over spiders, bugs, and slimy things.  This squeamishness led to my vegetarian lifestyle, which I practiced for the better part of 10 years, because I struggled in associating my food with the animals the food came from.  You can read more about my food history here if it interests you.  Currently, I would describe my food lifestyle as holistic, non-wasting, DIY, and authentically/locally sourced.

The 17 year-old girl in me would have a small heart attack to know she would grow into the woman I am today: butchering and grilling whole, slimy eels.  Eel is rich with omega-3 fatty acids, as well as other good for you vitamins and minerals.  If starting from scratch does not appeal to you, you can find prepared unagi in the frozen meat section of most Asian grocery stores.

Find the comprehensive recipe list and serving suggestions here.

BBQ Eel

Ingredients:

1 lb Freshwater Eel

1 cup Unagi Sauce

Method:

Here is where I admit I am no butchering expert.  I watched some YouTube videos of prepping eel, but the people in the videos are VERY adept with a knife.  So…I took about 30 minutes to do a sloppier job of what the guys in the video did in about 60 seconds.  To prep, gut it, get the bones out, cut in half lengthwise, then cut into 4″ steaks.  Leave the skin on – it will help while grilling.

Start your grill and turn heat to medium.  While the grill is heating, skewer the steaks.

Grill the Eel, skin side down, for three minutes.  Flip and grill another three minutes.  Turn the eel, baste with unagi sauce, and grill one minute skin side.  Flip again, baste with more unagi sauce, and grill one more minute.

Until Next Time,

Corrie Austin

Posted: 6-14-2019

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“Favorite Cookbook Contest” from the last blog post. And the winner is…Kelly Austin!

As I approached the last day of the farm stand that had become a frequent “go to” all summer and autumn I was at a loss. I had been seeing the bright yellow signs on the roadside that said November 24 –LAST DAY, but I was in denial. Common Roots, (www.commonroots.org) a farm stand and CSA, located off Spear Street at the intersection of Allen Road in South Burlington had become part of my weekly ritual. Where would I buy my vegetables, eggs, garlic, fresh local meat…? I also believed strongly in their mission which supports local food systems and provides food security for families and schools by fostering the relationships among farmers, educators, and the wider community.

The Friday before the pending closure for the season, my dear friend, Janet who lives in Boston made a surprise to visit to my house. I shared my disappointment with her. Her response.
“Let’s go together tomorrow and we’ll make it fun!” So off we went to Common Roots- a mile from my home to a place where farmers grow fresh organic produce in surrounding fields and also source eggs, cheese, Kombucha, meats, pickled green beans and more. It was chilly inside the charming little farm shop and there wasn’t much left on the shelves. Brown paper bags filled with Thanksgiving shares for CSA members were crowded together on a center table, waiting to be picked up. We grabbed our canvas bags and managed to fill them to the brim, as I explained to Janet that all summer and fall these shelves had been brimming local food from the fields. As we left, she patted me on the back with a you’ll be fine. Spring will return soon enough. HA! And doesn’t Vermont have Winter Farmers markets?

I imagine that many of you have felt similar feelings putting gardens to bed, bidding farewell to local farm stands and the local Farmers Markets. We have been so use to abundant locally grown food through - out the summer and autumn months, however the transition to late fall and winter isn’t always easy.

Fortunate for Vermonters there are over 18 Farmers Markets scattered around our state that offer abundant opportunities to find food, fun and much more. As December rolled in I suggested to Bronwyn that we visit our local Burlington Farmers market at the UVM Davis Center with anticipation of finding some good produce, and some ideas for holiday shopping. We found so much more. First, the parking was FREE!

And as we descended the stairs to the atrium level of the Davis Center, there was lively music playing and a wonderful array of tables filled to the brim with vegetables, cheese, coffee, hot chocolate, artisan crafts and more. Folks were having convivial conversations. This was clearly a happening place that I immediately knew I would be visiting all winter long.

We did a first blush walk through and on our second go I think we had almost parted with our money at every booth and had some special conversations with the vendors. We left with Orb Weaver Cheese, Specialty mushrooms, squash, the most beautiful eggs, kale, beets, soft cows cheese and an adorable hand carved ornament. It was so much fun. And to top it all off we shared the most delicious hot chocolate on the planet from a talented local chocolate maker.

What I found interesting was the stories these farmers and vendors shared with us. The scrumptious food and beautiful creative artisan goods reflected a sincere passion for their work. Their positive energy was contagious.

The Burlington Farmers market will run every Saturday between now and Christmas from 10am-2pm, and then once a month through April. If you live in Vermont, you can locate a Farmers Market near you by visiting -www.nofavt.org/vtfarmersmarkets or call 802-434-4122. And my sense is that wherever you live – there are options near you!

We can all continue to enjoy seasonal local food thanks to our hard -working farmers!

Last Blog’s Cookbook contest was such fun and our very first entrant, Kelly Austin, was the winner- her favorite cookbook…. Half Baked Harvest by Tieghan Gerard. Sweet little Mabon got in on the fun and picked our winner! Congratulations Kelly and enjoy your prize, Cooking for One, by Judith Jones- a treasure of a cookbook! Thank you to everyone who shared their favorites with us!

" ["post_title"]=> string(24) "Love food? Love Farmers!" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(22) "love-food-love-farmers" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-12-15 17:46:04" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-15 21:46:04" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5278" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#1124 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5229) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-18 18:58:50" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-18 22:58:50" ["post_content"]=> string(6990) " Who doesn’t own a cookbook?  In the age of social media,  one click can find you countless recipes from a wide range of sites including popular FOOD52, Epicurious, Allrecipes, Food Network, and Vermont based Eating Well.  I’ve also discovered clever named sites  like, Yummly,  Chowhound, and Spoonful.  Locating the perfect recipe from any one of these websites and others can be extremely helpful when you don’t have time to peruse your cookbook collection. These days people are on the go, and search on-line for finding almost everything.   However, despite the ease of on-line perfectly suitable recipes, which have a place in today’s world, I believe that there is always room for cookbooks. As we begin gearing up for the holidays, I thought a little seasonal COOKBOOK fun was in order.   It’s simple too!   Post the name of your favorite cookbook or two in the comment section on this blog and you will be entered into a drawing to win a cookbook- The Pleasures of Cooking for One by Judith Jones.  It’s a delightful read complete with helpful cooking tips and the recipes can be easily modified for more than one person. And if you want to add the name of your favorite recipe from that cookbook to your entry- even better! I love cookbooks!  They are constant companions in my kitchen. Over the past few decades, I have compiled three simple, spiral bound collections of recipes have been enjoyed by countless friends.  In 2004, I collaborated with two of my friends and created the third book, Atlantic, Pacific and Green Mountain Recipes. From Soup to Salmon Friends Share Favorites with Friends and Family.  My favorite of the three, complied with two  dear friends,  Anne from Boston’s south shore, and Andrea, from Seattle  shared some of our treasured recipes, from coast to coast.   Our collective friends and family have enjoyed our cookbooks - a regular “go to” for many. You can tell a lot about a person when your browse their cookbook collection.  Perhaps the largest and most diverse collection I have seen belonged to  Judith Jones’ collection  and graced the walls of every room in her NYC apartment where she had upwards of 1000 cookbooks.  In her beloved Vermont retreat Bryn Teg, shelves brim with almost as many.  After her death, a substantial portion of her collection was donated to Sterling College, located in Craftsbury Vermont-  and now able to be enjoyed by students, faculty and friends!  What a bountiful and beautiful legacy, made possible by Bronwyn Jones Dunne. As I browsed my personal cookbook collection, I discovered a 1943 edition of the Joy of Cooking tucked in a corner which hadn’t been touched in decades.  Old, worn and tattered, it is the most popular cookbook in America, but honestly compared to the current cookbooks, I find it somewhat plain and boring.  One of the United States most published cookbooks, it has been in print continuously since it was originally self published in 1936. Almost 20 million copies are in print today.  Well known books by Alice Waters, Ina Garten, Yotam Ottolenghi, Madhur Jaffrey, and Lidia Bastianich,  and an all time favorite,  Julia Childs, Mastering the Art of French Cooking…. among many more are front and center on my kitchen shelf. Recently I saw a very interesting film called Nothing Fancy, a documentary on Diana Kennedy, who is iconic for her numerous Mexican food cookbooks and influence on Mexican Cooking.  Bronwyn was the photographer for her author photo for her cookbook, The Tortilla Book in the 1980’s.  A charming and engaging film brought to Burlington by the Vermont International Film Festival, I highly recommend.   Kennedy put Mexican cooking on the map and at age 96,  is quite a character.  Vermont draws well known cookbook authors – during the past few years, Alice Waters and Jane Nathan are just a few that have visited here. Julia Child drew such a large crowd in St. Johnsbury 25 years ago that the event had to be relocated to the school gymnasium. Cookbooks today have evolved significantly over the decades.  They are often iconic and designed to be owned offering colorful and enticing photos, and text that engage you.  This new brand of cookbooks invite you to read them cover to cover, and not simply for following a recipe. Legendary Judith Jones put many of our current well known and famed cook book authors on the map because she believed in them.  We can be grateful for her ability to recognize talent and worked diligently to publish countless now well -known authors.  She penned several of her own including, Love ME Feed ME,   dedicated to her dog Mabon, and an autobiography,The Tenth Muse, as well as the aforementioned The Pleasures of Cooking for One. Earlier this fall, I traveled to Rochester Vermont for a wedding and visited one of my favorite haunts-Sandy’s Books and Bakery, an eclectic café /bookstore.  Next door they have a smaller space, The Bookery and Annex, that is brimming with an extensive used cookbook collection.  It’s worth a road trip to this sweet small Vermont town, located 50 miles south of Stowe. Peruse your cookbook collection and share with us your favorite cookbook. We will draw a name from all submissions on Monday, December 2nd, and share the list of favorites in our next Blog post. Feel free to name a favorite recipe as well. The Lost Kitchen by Erin French in on my holiday wish list.  You can never own too many cookbooks! Laurie Caswell Burke" ["post_title"]=> string(23) "Our Treasured Cookbooks" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(23) "our-treasured-cookbooks" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-11-29 08:35:57" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-29 12:35:57" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5229" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(2) "18" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#1128 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5217) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 08:56:19" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 12:56:19" ["post_content"]=> string(5936) " October brings a tapestry of fall colors across our Vermont landscapes with yellows, orange and red blazes.  And on almost every door stoop or walkway, pumpkins sit proudly clamoring to be noticed.  I’m always struck by the fact that it seems way too early to put pumpkins out as Halloween is thirty-one days away.  Won’t they be rotten by then?  As I watch more and more pumpkins all shapes and sizes grace front steps, walkways, and roadside stands, I’m determined not to give in this early - why rush things? A week ago, I caved, and bought our family pumpkin which now sits proudly on our front stoop. This year I went for a Cinderella pumpkin, which was one of the most popular and common pumpkins grown in France in the 1800’s.  It’s short and ornamental and bears little resemblance to your traditional taller and smoother Jack- o -Lantern pumpkin.  Cinderella pumpkins are known more for their beauty and the flesh is somewhat sweet and its flavor very subtle. After further research, I discovered that there are British pumpkins, Chinese, Indian and even Australian pumpkins- all somewhat different and something I had never given much thought. Every country appears to have their version of pumpkins. My favorite part of a pumpkin is hands down the seeds that you roast in the oven for about thirty to forty-five minutes until they are dry and then tossed with salt. I usually enjoy them this simple and easy way.  For a sweeter taste, you can toss the seeds with cinnamon and sugar. For a spicier flavor, toss with smoked paprika or a garam masala mix. Extracting the seeds from the slimy flesh and lining them in a single layer on a lightly oiled baking sheet can be messy but worth the work. Pumpkins are one of the most nutritional foods, loaded with anti-oxidants disease-fighting vitamins, they are considered a Superfood that provide a good source of Vitamin A and C. With an abundance of orange pumpkins available I was determined to create a few dishes. Never a big fan of pumpkin pie, I sought other options. On a recent October weekend, I returned to the quaint cottage, Bryn Teg, with Bronwyn with two recipes in hand- one for Curried Pumpkin Soup and the other, Best Ever Pumpkin Muffins.   In the charming kitchen with a view of an expansive landscape ablaze in color, I made the soup.  And I was reminded of an important lesson - not all recipes you find on the internet are always accurate.  As I questioned the four cups of water listed in the ingredients, I reluctantly decided to only add two cups and even then, the soup lacked flavor. With Bronwyn at my side, we managed to salvage the recipe adding more spices and pumpkin to create the most delicious pumpkin soup, - a new version that is now ours to claim.   The muffins were gluten free as I substituted almond flour hoping it would not impact the outcome.  It worked.   They turned out lighter and delicious and for someone who does not typically like muffins – I loved these – a recipe from the Lovely Little Kitchen, modified slightly. We roasted the seeds and ate them like candy.  When I returned home, I went immediately to the Common Roots Farmstand nearby and purchased several more pumpkins to make more roasted seeds.  I highly suggest that before you toss your pumpkins into the compost bin, extract the seeds and roast them! Pumpkins continue to appear everywhere- loaded up on carts at markets, gracing the entrance to farm stands, on roadsides with handmade signs and on our stoops.  Recently at the market, I stood behind a lady who had one Jack-o Lantern on the grocery belt with 3 packages of stencils and tools to carve pumpkins.   I reminisced the days we carved spooky and goofy faces with our young children. Carving pumpkins is fun for all ages and I need to get a Jack- O Lantern before Halloween. As we move closer to November, our brightly colored mums begin to fade, and our pumpkins become softer, I hope you will create something in your kitchen.   A hearty soup, muffins, a pumpkin cheesecake or roasted seeds are a few suggestions.  And beware that if a recipe doesn’t seem right- trust your instincts.   My attitude towards pumpkins has shifted – they are not just for décor and carving spooky faces but offer us a healthy colorful food to enjoy in a multitude of ways. Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight, turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends! -Laurie Caswell Burke" ["post_title"]=> string(32) "Pumpkins of all shapes and sizes" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(258) "Pumpkins are part of autumn tapestry, brightly colored and proudly clamoring to be noticed on stoops, walkways, and farmstand displays.  Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends! " ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(32) "pumpkins-of-all-shapes-and-sizes" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-10-31 17:04:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-10-31 21:04:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5217" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "6" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#1129 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5184) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 08:29:30" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 12:29:30" ["post_content"]=> string(4611) " When I asked a friend from India if she would give me some recipes, she generously made me mountains of delicious homemade Indian food.  But you know the adage, give a man fish vs teaching him to fish - I wanted to know how to make it myself! I asked her to join me in my new kitchen (yes, NEW! We just bought our first home!)  While teaching me to cook, she told me about her childhood in India, how strictly she and her friends do or don't follow tradition, and her family and friends.  I love hearing people's stories.  The world becomes both smaller and larger at the same time, and these are things you can't learn by just reading a recipe. And now, I have three new must-haves for my kitchen repertoire! #1. Cumin Seeds I regularly keep ground cumin on hand, but cumin seeds take it to a whole new level.  They are best used by heating oil in a pan, then stir in cumin seeds until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  It's that easy! Continue making your meal/following your recipe as planned.  Don't worry - there are no hard to chew seeds or husks in the end result. Don't know where to start? Try the basic curry recipe below! #2. Garam Masala Garam masala is a blend of many spices that are toasted prior to being ground together.  The name means "warming spices," not by adding spicy heat, but because in Ayurvedic medicine, these spices "warm" the body, meaning they are said to increase the metabolism. Typical spices included, though there are multiple variations, and this list is not comprehensive: coriander, cumin, cardamom pods, cloves, peppercorn, star anise, turmeric, and fennel. #3. Ginger-Garlic Paste Easy and delicious, this aromatic blend is perfect for cooking meat. To make - add equal parts fresh ginger and garlic, plus a sprinkle of turmeric, purée in a blender or food processor.  Store in an air tight container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. Chicken or Chickpea Curry Ingredients: 1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil 1 Onion 1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds 2 Tomatoes 1 1/2 lb Chicken or 1-2 cans garbanzo beans Garlic and Ginger Purée (see method above) Spices to taste: garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, and either red chili or cayenne if you like some heat Method: Heat olive oil in a large pan over medium heat.  While pan is heating, dice an onion.  Add cumin seeds to pan, and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Add onion and sprinkle with salt.  Stir occasionally until onion is cooked through (about 12 minutes).  While onion is cooking, dice two tomatoes and cut chicken into cubes.  Add tomato and stir gently for 30 seconds.  Add chicken or chickpeas and a generous spoonful of garlic and ginger puree.  Cook uncovered until "raw" smell is gone.  Cover and cook until almost done, stirring occasionally.  Uncover and stir in garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, cayenne, and salt to taste.  Cook until done.  Right before removing from heat, add small handful of chopped cilantro and stir until wilted. Jeera Rice (Coriander Rice) Ingredients: 1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil 1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds Handful Fresh Cilantro Salt to taste 1 cup rice 2 cup water or broth Method: Heat olive oil in a small pan.  Add cumin seeds and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Meanwhile, chop a small bunch of cilantro.  Add to cumin and oil and stir until wilted and coated with olive oil (about 15 seconds).  Add cumin and cilantro mix, plus salt to taste, to whatever vessel you plan to cook your rice with.  Prepare rice the same as you normally would (we use our pressure cooker)." ["post_title"]=> string(43) "Three New Must-Haves For Your Spice Cabinet" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(186) "Add spice to your life by including these three new flavors to your list of kitchen essentials. Inspired by Indian cooking, these ingredients are versatile and tasty - recipes included!" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(43) "three-new-must-haves-for-your-spice-cabinet" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 08:30:01" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 12:30:01" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5184" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "4" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#1207 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5177) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 07:26:48" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 11:26:48" ["post_content"]=> string(3807) "

Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel.

Don't turn your nose up just yet - if you love the combination of sweet & salty in your juicy BBQ Chicken, you'll love BBQ Eel.  Follow the recipe below! One of my favorite dishes at a sushi restaurant is Unagi, which is a fancy way of saying BBQ eel.  I was inspired to make my own after a colleague told me you can fish for eels in the rivers that feed into Lake Champlagne.  Someday I hope to catch my own, but the one used for this meal was a caught by my colleague. I was a squeamish child and young adult, squealing over spiders, bugs, and slimy things.  This squeamishness led to my vegetarian lifestyle, which I practiced for the better part of 10 years, because I struggled in associating my food with the animals the food came from.  You can read more about my food history here if it interests you.  Currently, I would describe my food lifestyle as holistic, non-wasting, DIY, and authentically/locally sourced. The 17 year-old girl in me would have a small heart attack to know she would grow into the woman I am today: butchering and grilling whole, slimy eels.  Eel is rich with omega-3 fatty acids, as well as other good for you vitamins and minerals.  If starting from scratch does not appeal to you, you can find prepared unagi in the frozen meat section of most Asian grocery stores. Find the comprehensive recipe list and serving suggestions here.

BBQ Eel

Ingredients: 1 lb Freshwater Eel 1 cup Unagi Sauce Method: Here is where I admit I am no butchering expert.  I watched some YouTube videos of prepping eel, but the people in the videos are VERY adept with a knife.  So...I took about 30 minutes to do a sloppier job of what the guys in the video did in about 60 seconds.  To prep, gut it, get the bones out, cut in half lengthwise, then cut into 4" steaks.  Leave the skin on - it will help while grilling. Start your grill and turn heat to medium.  While the grill is heating, skewer the steaks. Grill the Eel, skin side down, for three minutes.  Flip and grill another three minutes.  Turn the eel, baste with unagi sauce, and grill one minute skin side.  Flip again, baste with more unagi sauce, and grill one more minute. Until Next Time, Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(40) "dEELicious Flavors for your Summer Grill" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(246) "Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel. Fresh-caught from the rivers that feed into Lake Champlain, eel can be a delicious and unique addition to your summertime grill menu." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(40) "deelicious-flavors-for-your-summer-grill" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 07:26:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 11:26:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5177" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "2" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post_count"]=> int(5) ["current_post"]=> int(4) ["in_the_loop"]=> bool(true) ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#1207 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5177) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 07:26:48" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 11:26:48" ["post_content"]=> string(3807) "

Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel.

Don't turn your nose up just yet - if you love the combination of sweet & salty in your juicy BBQ Chicken, you'll love BBQ Eel.  Follow the recipe below! One of my favorite dishes at a sushi restaurant is Unagi, which is a fancy way of saying BBQ eel.  I was inspired to make my own after a colleague told me you can fish for eels in the rivers that feed into Lake Champlagne.  Someday I hope to catch my own, but the one used for this meal was a caught by my colleague. I was a squeamish child and young adult, squealing over spiders, bugs, and slimy things.  This squeamishness led to my vegetarian lifestyle, which I practiced for the better part of 10 years, because I struggled in associating my food with the animals the food came from.  You can read more about my food history here if it interests you.  Currently, I would describe my food lifestyle as holistic, non-wasting, DIY, and authentically/locally sourced. The 17 year-old girl in me would have a small heart attack to know she would grow into the woman I am today: butchering and grilling whole, slimy eels.  Eel is rich with omega-3 fatty acids, as well as other good for you vitamins and minerals.  If starting from scratch does not appeal to you, you can find prepared unagi in the frozen meat section of most Asian grocery stores. Find the comprehensive recipe list and serving suggestions here.

BBQ Eel

Ingredients: 1 lb Freshwater Eel 1 cup Unagi Sauce Method: Here is where I admit I am no butchering expert.  I watched some YouTube videos of prepping eel, but the people in the videos are VERY adept with a knife.  So...I took about 30 minutes to do a sloppier job of what the guys in the video did in about 60 seconds.  To prep, gut it, get the bones out, cut in half lengthwise, then cut into 4" steaks.  Leave the skin on - it will help while grilling. Start your grill and turn heat to medium.  While the grill is heating, skewer the steaks. Grill the Eel, skin side down, for three minutes.  Flip and grill another three minutes.  Turn the eel, baste with unagi sauce, and grill one minute skin side.  Flip again, baste with more unagi sauce, and grill one more minute. Until Next Time, Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(40) "dEELicious Flavors for your Summer Grill" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(246) "Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel. Fresh-caught from the rivers that feed into Lake Champlain, eel can be a delicious and unique addition to your summertime grill menu." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(40) "deelicious-flavors-for-your-summer-grill" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 07:26:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 11:26:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5177" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "2" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["comments"]=> array(4) { [0]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1330 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208729" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5184" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Bronwyn Dunne" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "bronwyndunne@mac.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(34) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "64.222.107.3" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-07-15 11:12:31" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-15 15:12:31" ["comment_content"]=> string(422) "This is a great primer on how to cook Indian cuisine and I remember when -many years ago- I invited a neighbor to join me in my newish kitchen so she and I could make an Indian curry together. It was my Indian friend who taught me that curry is not just a single powder that comes out of jar but an assortment of spices....toasting them in a hot pan filled my kitchen with the essence of her native country...such a treat!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(1) { [208730]=> object(WP_Comment)#1340 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208730" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5184" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Corrie Austin" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(21) "micalou1735@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "64.223.67.34" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-07-15 13:12:40" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-15 17:12:40" ["comment_content"]=> string(266) "Hello Bronwyn! I only recently, a little over a year ago, learned the same about curry not being a single spice. It also helps explain why there is such variance in the flavor. How fun we both have such pivotal experiences in our new kitchens! Take care, Corrie" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(6) "208729" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [1]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1340 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208730" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5184" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Corrie Austin" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(21) "micalou1735@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "64.223.67.34" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-07-15 13:12:40" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-15 17:12:40" ["comment_content"]=> string(266) "Hello Bronwyn! I only recently, a little over a year ago, learned the same about curry not being a single spice. It also helps explain why there is such variance in the flavor. How fun we both have such pivotal experiences in our new kitchens! Take care, Corrie" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(6) "208729" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [2]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1314 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208731" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5184" ["comment_author"]=> string(15) "Maria Brandriff" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "mbrandriff@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.198.90.127" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-07-20 16:43:37" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-20 20:43:37" ["comment_content"]=> string(167) "When I was in India, I learned that garam masala means "merchant's spice mix", so in essence every merchant has his own blend, hence another reason for the variations." 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That sounds amazing! Thanks :)" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } } ["comment_count"]=> int(4) ["current_comment"]=> int(-1) ["found_posts"]=> string(3) "123" ["max_num_pages"]=> float(25) ["max_num_comment_pages"]=> int(0) ["is_single"]=> bool(false) ["is_preview"]=> bool(false) ["is_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_archive"]=> bool(true) ["is_date"]=> bool(false) ["is_year"]=> bool(false) ["is_month"]=> bool(false) ["is_day"]=> bool(false) ["is_time"]=> bool(false) ["is_author"]=> bool(false) ["is_category"]=> bool(true) ["is_tag"]=> bool(false) ["is_tax"]=> bool(false) ["is_search"]=> bool(false) ["is_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_comment_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_trackback"]=> bool(false) ["is_home"]=> bool(false) ["is_privacy_policy"]=> bool(false) ["is_404"]=> bool(false) ["is_embed"]=> bool(false) ["is_paged"]=> bool(false) ["is_admin"]=> bool(false) ["is_attachment"]=> bool(false) ["is_singular"]=> bool(false) ["is_robots"]=> bool(false) ["is_posts_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_post_type_archive"]=> bool(false) ["query_vars_hash":"WP_Query":private]=> string(32) "b239cec030b7b08e2301315b28070261" ["query_vars_changed":"WP_Query":private]=> bool(false) ["thumbnails_cached"]=> bool(false) ["stopwords":"WP_Query":private]=> NULL ["compat_fields":"WP_Query":private]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(15) "query_vars_hash" [1]=> string(18) "query_vars_changed" } ["compat_methods":"WP_Query":private]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(16) "init_query_flags" [1]=> string(15) "parse_tax_query" } ["comments_by_type"]=> array(4) { ["comment"]=> array(4) { [0]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1330 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208729" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5184" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Bronwyn Dunne" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "bronwyndunne@mac.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(34) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "64.222.107.3" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-07-15 11:12:31" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-15 15:12:31" ["comment_content"]=> string(422) "This is a great primer on how to cook Indian cuisine and I remember when -many years ago- I invited a neighbor to join me in my newish kitchen so she and I could make an Indian curry together. It was my Indian friend who taught me that curry is not just a single powder that comes out of jar but an assortment of spices....toasting them in a hot pan filled my kitchen with the essence of her native country...such a treat!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children":protected]=> array(1) { [208730]=> object(WP_Comment)#1340 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208730" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5184" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Corrie Austin" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(21) "micalou1735@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "64.223.67.34" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-07-15 13:12:40" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-15 17:12:40" ["comment_content"]=> string(266) "Hello Bronwyn! I only recently, a little over a year ago, learned the same about curry not being a single spice. It also helps explain why there is such variance in the flavor. How fun we both have such pivotal experiences in our new kitchens! Take care, Corrie" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(6) "208729" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [1]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1340 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208730" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5184" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Corrie Austin" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(21) "micalou1735@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "64.223.67.34" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-07-15 13:12:40" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-15 17:12:40" ["comment_content"]=> string(266) "Hello Bronwyn! I only recently, a little over a year ago, learned the same about curry not being a single spice. It also helps explain why there is such variance in the flavor. How fun we both have such pivotal experiences in our new kitchens! Take care, Corrie" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(7) "comment" ["comment_parent"]=> string(6) "208729" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children":protected]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children":protected]=> bool(true) ["post_fields":protected]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [2]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1314 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208731" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5184" ["comment_author"]=> string(15) "Maria Brandriff" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "mbrandriff@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.198.90.127" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-07-20 16:43:37" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-20 20:43:37" ["comment_content"]=> string(167) "When I was in India, I learned that garam masala means "merchant's spice mix", so in essence every merchant has his own blend, hence another reason for the variations." 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2 responses to “dEELicious Flavors for your Summer Grill”

  1. The photo of you and the eel is my favorite of all the blog photos! Where in the Burlington area -if you’re not a fisherman- can you find eel? Definitely want to try….looked delicious on the grill!!

    • Corrie Austin says:

      That is a very good question! They may have eels at either the Central Asian Market on Winooski Ave or at Thai Phat Oriental Food Market on North Street.

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