A culinary online center dedicated to promoting the importance and the joy of American home cooking with an emphasis on local products and talent, celebrating the unique spirit and energy of the new food world ethos, especially in Vermont.

amuse bouche

I love quotes that add meaning to my life. Here are a few to live by:

Americans who have been to France and come home craving a reminder of their magical European experience, love Vermont cheeses.
—Allison Hooper, founder, VT Butter & Cheese Creamery

Practice not cleaning your plate: it will help you eat less in short term and develop self-control in the long term.
—Michael Pollan

Sweet taste buds develop before all others, that’s why small children love sweets.
—Bronwyn Dunne

Don’t eat breakfast cereals that change the color of milk.
—Michael Pollan

My rule of thumb is, when in doubt, cook more than you think you may need.
—Marian Cunningham, from Learning to Cook


Pumpkins of all shapes and sizes

October brings a tapestry of fall colors across our Vermont landscapes with yellows, orange and red blazes.  And on almost every door stoop or walkway, pumpkins sit proudly clamoring to be noticed.  I’m always struck by the fact that it seems way too early to put pumpkins out as Halloween is thirty-one days away.  Won’t they be rotten by then?  As I watch more and more pumpkins all shapes and sizes grace front steps, walkways, and roadside stands, I’m determined not to give in this early – why rush things?

A week ago, I caved, and bought our family pumpkin which now sits proudly on our front stoop. This year I went for a Cinderella pumpkin, which was one of the most popular and common pumpkins grown in France in the 1800’s.  It’s short and ornamental and bears little resemblance to your traditional taller and smoother Jack- o -Lantern pumpkin.  Cinderella pumpkins are known more for their beauty and the flesh is somewhat sweet and its flavor very subtle.

After further research, I discovered that there are British pumpkins, Chinese, Indian and even Australian pumpkins- all somewhat different and something I had never given much thought.

Every country appears to have their version of pumpkins.

My favorite part of a pumpkin is hands down the seeds that you roast in the oven for about thirty to forty-five minutes until they are dry and then tossed with salt. I usually enjoy them this simple and easy way.  For a sweeter taste, you can toss the seeds with cinnamon and sugar. For a spicier flavor, toss with smoked paprika or a garam masala mix. Extracting the seeds from the slimy flesh and lining them in a single layer on a lightly oiled baking sheet can be messy but worth the work.

Pumpkins are one of the most nutritional foods, loaded with anti-oxidants disease-fighting vitamins, they are considered a Superfood that provide a good source of Vitamin A and C.

With an abundance of orange pumpkins available I was determined to create a few dishes. Never a big fan of pumpkin pie, I sought other options. On a recent October weekend, I returned to the quaint cottage, Bryn Teg, with Bronwyn with two recipes in hand- one for Curried Pumpkin Soup and the other, Best Ever Pumpkin Muffins.   In the charming kitchen with a view of an expansive landscape ablaze in color, I made the soup.  And I was reminded of an important lesson – not all recipes you find on the internet are always accurate.  As I questioned the four cups of water listed in the ingredients, I reluctantly decided to only add two cups and even then, the soup lacked flavor.

With Bronwyn at my side, we managed to salvage the recipe adding more spices and pumpkin to create the most delicious pumpkin soup, – a new version that is now ours to claim.   The muffins were gluten free as I substituted almond flour hoping it would not impact the outcome.  It worked.   They turned out lighter and delicious and for someone who does not typically like muffins – I loved these – a recipe from the Lovely Little Kitchen, modified slightly.

We roasted the seeds and ate them like candy.  When I returned home, I went immediately to the Common Roots Farmstand nearby and purchased several more pumpkins to make more roasted seeds.  I highly suggest that before you toss your pumpkins into the compost bin, extract the seeds and roast them!

Pumpkins continue to appear everywhere- loaded up on carts at markets, gracing the entrance to farm stands, on roadsides with handmade signs and on our stoops.  Recently at the market, I stood behind a lady who had one Jack-o Lantern on the grocery belt with 3 packages of stencils and tools to carve pumpkins.   I reminisced the days we carved spooky and goofy faces with our young children. Carving pumpkins is fun for all ages and I need to get a Jack- O Lantern before Halloween.

As we move closer to November, our brightly colored mums begin to fade, and our pumpkins become softer, I hope you will create something in your kitchen.   A hearty soup, muffins, a pumpkin cheesecake or roasted seeds are a few suggestions.  And beware that if a recipe doesn’t seem right- trust your instincts.   My attitude towards pumpkins has shifted – they are not just for décor and carving spooky faces but offer us a healthy colorful food to enjoy in a multitude of ways.

Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight, turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends!

-Laurie Caswell Burke

Posted: 10-27-2019

object(WP_Query)#941 (51) {
  ["query_vars"]=>
  array(63) {
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["error"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["m"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["p"]=>
    int(0)
    ["post_parent"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["name"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["pagename"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["page_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["second"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["minute"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["hour"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["day"]=>
    int(0)
    ["monthnum"]=>
    int(0)
    ["year"]=>
    int(0)
    ["w"]=>
    int(0)
    ["tag"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["cat"]=>
    int(1)
    ["tag_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author_name"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["feed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["tb"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["paged"]=>
    int(0)
    ["meta_key"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["meta_value"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["preview"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["s"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["sentence"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["title"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["fields"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["menu_order"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["embed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["category__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_name__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["ignore_sticky_posts"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["suppress_filters"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["cache_results"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_term_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["lazy_load_term_meta"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_meta_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["post_type"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["posts_per_page"]=>
    int(5)
    ["nopaging"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["comments_per_page"]=>
    string(2) "50"
    ["no_found_rows"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["order"]=>
    string(4) "DESC"
  }
  ["tax_query"]=>
  object(WP_Tax_Query)#373 (6) {
    ["queries"]=>
    array(1) {
      [0]=>
      array(5) {
        ["taxonomy"]=>
        string(8) "category"
        ["terms"]=>
        array(1) {
          [0]=>
          string(4) "blog"
        }
        ["field"]=>
        string(4) "slug"
        ["operator"]=>
        string(2) "IN"
        ["include_children"]=>
        bool(true)
      }
    }
    ["relation"]=>
    string(3) "AND"
    ["table_aliases:protected"]=>
    array(1) {
      [0]=>
      string(21) "wp_term_relationships"
    }
    ["queried_terms"]=>
    array(1) {
      ["category"]=>
      array(2) {
        ["terms"]=>
        array(1) {
          [0]=>
          string(4) "blog"
        }
        ["field"]=>
        string(4) "slug"
      }
    }
    ["primary_table"]=>
    string(8) "wp_posts"
    ["primary_id_column"]=>
    string(2) "ID"
  }
  ["meta_query"]=>
  object(WP_Meta_Query)#374 (9) {
    ["queries"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["relation"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["table_aliases:protected"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["clauses:protected"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["has_or_relation:protected"]=>
    bool(false)
  }
  ["date_query"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["post_count"]=>
  int(5)
  ["current_post"]=>
  int(0)
  ["in_the_loop"]=>
  bool(true)
  ["comment_count"]=>
  int(0)
  ["current_comment"]=>
  int(-1)
  ["found_posts"]=>
  string(3) "121"
  ["max_num_pages"]=>
  float(25)
  ["max_num_comment_pages"]=>
  int(0)
  ["is_single"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_preview"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_page"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_archive"]=>
  bool(true)
  ["is_date"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_year"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_month"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_day"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_time"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_author"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_category"]=>
  bool(true)
  ["is_tag"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_tax"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_search"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_feed"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_comment_feed"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_trackback"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_home"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_404"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_embed"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_paged"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_admin"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_attachment"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_singular"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_robots"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_posts_page"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_post_type_archive"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["query_vars_hash:private"]=>
  string(32) "b239cec030b7b08e2301315b28070261"
  ["query_vars_changed:private"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["thumbnails_cached"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["stopwords:private"]=>
  NULL
  ["compat_fields:private"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(15) "query_vars_hash"
    [1]=>
    string(18) "query_vars_changed"
  }
  ["compat_methods:private"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(16) "init_query_flags"
    [1]=>
    string(15) "parse_tax_query"
  }
  ["query"]=>
  array(1) {
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
  }
  ["request"]=>
  string(341) "SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS  wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts  LEFT JOIN wp_term_relationships ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_term_relationships.object_id) WHERE 1=1  AND ( 
  wp_term_relationships.term_taxonomy_id IN (1)
) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post' AND (wp_posts.post_status = 'publish') GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 5"
  ["posts"]=>
  &array(5) {
    [0]=>
    object(WP_Post)#372 (24) {
      ["ID"]=>
      int(5217)
      ["post_author"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_date"]=>
      string(19) "2019-10-27 08:56:19"
      ["post_date_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-10-27 12:56:19"
      ["post_content"]=>
      string(5936) "

October brings a tapestry of fall colors across our Vermont landscapes with yellows, orange and red blazes.  And on almost every door stoop or walkway, pumpkins sit proudly clamoring to be noticed.  I’m always struck by the fact that it seems way too early to put pumpkins out as Halloween is thirty-one days away.  Won’t they be rotten by then?  As I watch more and more pumpkins all shapes and sizes grace front steps, walkways, and roadside stands, I’m determined not to give in this early - why rush things?

A week ago, I caved, and bought our family pumpkin which now sits proudly on our front stoop. This year I went for a Cinderella pumpkin, which was one of the most popular and common pumpkins grown in France in the 1800’s.  It’s short and ornamental and bears little resemblance to your traditional taller and smoother Jack- o -Lantern pumpkin.  Cinderella pumpkins are known more for their beauty and the flesh is somewhat sweet and its flavor very subtle.



After further research, I discovered that there are British pumpkins, Chinese, Indian and even Australian pumpkins- all somewhat different and something I had never given much thought.

Every country appears to have their version of pumpkins.

My favorite part of a pumpkin is hands down the seeds that you roast in the oven for about thirty to forty-five minutes until they are dry and then tossed with salt. I usually enjoy them this simple and easy way.  For a sweeter taste, you can toss the seeds with cinnamon and sugar. For a spicier flavor, toss with smoked paprika or a garam masala mix. Extracting the seeds from the slimy flesh and lining them in a single layer on a lightly oiled baking sheet can be messy but worth the work.



Pumpkins are one of the most nutritional foods, loaded with anti-oxidants disease-fighting vitamins, they are considered a Superfood that provide a good source of Vitamin A and C.

With an abundance of orange pumpkins available I was determined to create a few dishes. Never a big fan of pumpkin pie, I sought other options. On a recent October weekend, I returned to the quaint cottage, Bryn Teg, with Bronwyn with two recipes in hand- one for Curried Pumpkin Soup and the other, Best Ever Pumpkin Muffins.   In the charming kitchen with a view of an expansive landscape ablaze in color, I made the soup.  And I was reminded of an important lesson - not all recipes you find on the internet are always accurate.  As I questioned the four cups of water listed in the ingredients, I reluctantly decided to only add two cups and even then, the soup lacked flavor.



With Bronwyn at my side, we managed to salvage the recipe adding more spices and pumpkin to create the most delicious pumpkin soup, - a new version that is now ours to claim.   The muffins were gluten free as I substituted almond flour hoping it would not impact the outcome.  It worked.   They turned out lighter and delicious and for someone who does not typically like muffins – I loved these – a recipe from the Lovely Little Kitchen, modified slightly.

We roasted the seeds and ate them like candy.  When I returned home, I went immediately to the Common Roots Farmstand nearby and purchased several more pumpkins to make more roasted seeds.  I highly suggest that before you toss your pumpkins into the compost bin, extract the seeds and roast them!



Pumpkins continue to appear everywhere- loaded up on carts at markets, gracing the entrance to farm stands, on roadsides with handmade signs and on our stoops.  Recently at the market, I stood behind a lady who had one Jack-o Lantern on the grocery belt with 3 packages of stencils and tools to carve pumpkins.   I reminisced the days we carved spooky and goofy faces with our young children. Carving pumpkins is fun for all ages and I need to get a Jack- O Lantern before Halloween.

As we move closer to November, our brightly colored mums begin to fade, and our pumpkins become softer, I hope you will create something in your kitchen.   A hearty soup, muffins, a pumpkin cheesecake or roasted seeds are a few suggestions.  And beware that if a recipe doesn’t seem right- trust your instincts.   My attitude towards pumpkins has shifted – they are not just for décor and carving spooky faces but offer us a healthy colorful food to enjoy in a multitude of ways.

Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight, turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends!

-Laurie Caswell Burke"
      ["post_title"]=>
      string(32) "Pumpkins of all shapes and sizes"
      ["post_excerpt"]=>
      string(258) "Pumpkins are part of autumn tapestry, brightly colored and proudly clamoring to be noticed on stoops, walkways, and farmstand displays.   Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends!  "
      ["post_status"]=>
      string(7) "publish"
      ["comment_status"]=>
      string(4) "open"
      ["ping_status"]=>
      string(4) "open"
      ["post_password"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_name"]=>
      string(32) "pumpkins-of-all-shapes-and-sizes"
      ["to_ping"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["pinged"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_modified"]=>
      string(19) "2019-10-31 17:04:48"
      ["post_modified_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-10-31 21:04:48"
      ["post_content_filtered"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_parent"]=>
      int(0)
      ["guid"]=>
      string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5217"
      ["menu_order"]=>
      int(0)
      ["post_type"]=>
      string(4) "post"
      ["post_mime_type"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["comment_count"]=>
      string(1) "6"
      ["filter"]=>
      string(3) "raw"
    }
    [1]=>
    object(WP_Post)#371 (24) {
      ["ID"]=>
      int(5184)
      ["post_author"]=>
      string(1) "8"
      ["post_date"]=>
      string(19) "2019-07-14 08:29:30"
      ["post_date_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-07-14 12:29:30"
      ["post_content"]=>
      string(4611) "

When I asked a friend from India if she would give me some recipes, she generously made me mountains of delicious homemade Indian food.  But you know the adage, give a man fish vs teaching him to fish - I wanted to know how to make it myself!

I asked her to join me in my new kitchen (yes, NEW! We just bought our first home!)  While teaching me to cook, she told me about her childhood in India, how strictly she and her friends do or don't follow tradition, and her family and friends.  I love hearing people's stories.  The world becomes both smaller and larger at the same time, and these are things you can't learn by just reading a recipe.

And now, I have three new must-haves for my kitchen repertoire!



#1. Cumin Seeds

I regularly keep ground cumin on hand, but cumin seeds take it to a whole new level.  They are best used by heating oil in a pan, then stir in cumin seeds until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  It's that easy! Continue making your meal/following your recipe as planned.  Don't worry - there are no hard to chew seeds or husks in the end result.

Don't know where to start? Try the basic curry recipe below!

#2. Garam Masala

Garam masala is a blend of many spices that are toasted prior to being ground together.  The name means "warming spices," not by adding spicy heat, but because in Ayurvedic medicine, these spices "warm" the body, meaning they are said to increase the metabolism.

Typical spices included, though there are multiple variations, and this list is not comprehensive: coriander, cumin, cardamom pods, cloves, peppercorn, star anise, turmeric, and fennel.

#3. Ginger-Garlic Paste

Easy and delicious, this aromatic blend is perfect for cooking meat.

To make - add equal parts fresh ginger and garlic, plus a sprinkle of turmeric, purée in a blender or food processor.  Store in an air tight container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.



Chicken or Chickpea Curry

Ingredients:

1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil

1 Onion

1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds

2 Tomatoes

1 1/2 lb Chicken or 1-2 cans garbanzo beans

Garlic and Ginger Purée (see method above)

Spices to taste: garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, and either red chili or cayenne if you like some heat

Method:

Heat olive oil in a large pan over medium heat.  While pan is heating, dice an onion.  Add cumin seeds to pan, and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Add onion and sprinkle with salt.  Stir occasionally until onion is cooked through (about 12 minutes).  While onion is cooking, dice two tomatoes and cut chicken into cubes.  Add tomato and stir gently for 30 seconds.  Add chicken or chickpeas and a generous spoonful of garlic and ginger puree.  Cook uncovered until "raw" smell is gone.  Cover and cook until almost done, stirring occasionally.  Uncover and stir in garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, cayenne, and salt to taste.  Cook until done.  Right before removing from heat, add small handful of chopped cilantro and stir until wilted.

Jeera Rice (Coriander Rice)

Ingredients:

1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil

1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds

Handful Fresh Cilantro

Salt to taste

1 cup rice

2 cup water or broth

Method:

Heat olive oil in a small pan.  Add cumin seeds and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Meanwhile, chop a small bunch of cilantro.  Add to cumin and oil and stir until wilted and coated with olive oil (about 15 seconds).  Add cumin and cilantro mix, plus salt to taste, to whatever vessel you plan to cook your rice with.  Prepare rice the same as you normally would (we use our pressure cooker)."
      ["post_title"]=>
      string(43) "Three New Must-Haves For Your Spice Cabinet"
      ["post_excerpt"]=>
      string(186) "Add spice to your life by including these three new flavors to your list of kitchen essentials.  Inspired by Indian cooking, these ingredients are versatile and tasty - recipes included!"
      ["post_status"]=>
      string(7) "publish"
      ["comment_status"]=>
      string(4) "open"
      ["ping_status"]=>
      string(4) "open"
      ["post_password"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_name"]=>
      string(43) "three-new-must-haves-for-your-spice-cabinet"
      ["to_ping"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["pinged"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_modified"]=>
      string(19) "2019-07-14 08:30:01"
      ["post_modified_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-07-14 12:30:01"
      ["post_content_filtered"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_parent"]=>
      int(0)
      ["guid"]=>
      string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5184"
      ["menu_order"]=>
      int(0)
      ["post_type"]=>
      string(4) "post"
      ["post_mime_type"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["comment_count"]=>
      string(1) "4"
      ["filter"]=>
      string(3) "raw"
    }
    [2]=>
    object(WP_Post)#368 (24) {
      ["ID"]=>
      int(5177)
      ["post_author"]=>
      string(1) "8"
      ["post_date"]=>
      string(19) "2019-06-14 07:26:48"
      ["post_date_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-06-14 11:26:48"
      ["post_content"]=>
      string(3807) "

Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel.

Don't turn your nose up just yet - if you love the combination of sweet & salty in your juicy BBQ Chicken, you'll love BBQ Eel.  Follow the recipe below! One of my favorite dishes at a sushi restaurant is Unagi, which is a fancy way of saying BBQ eel.  I was inspired to make my own after a colleague told me you can fish for eels in the rivers that feed into Lake Champlagne.  Someday I hope to catch my own, but the one used for this meal was a caught by my colleague. I was a squeamish child and young adult, squealing over spiders, bugs, and slimy things.  This squeamishness led to my vegetarian lifestyle, which I practiced for the better part of 10 years, because I struggled in associating my food with the animals the food came from.  You can read more about my food history here if it interests you.  Currently, I would describe my food lifestyle as holistic, non-wasting, DIY, and authentically/locally sourced. The 17 year-old girl in me would have a small heart attack to know she would grow into the woman I am today: butchering and grilling whole, slimy eels.  Eel is rich with omega-3 fatty acids, as well as other good for you vitamins and minerals.  If starting from scratch does not appeal to you, you can find prepared unagi in the frozen meat section of most Asian grocery stores. Find the comprehensive recipe list and serving suggestions here.

BBQ Eel

Ingredients: 1 lb Freshwater Eel 1 cup Unagi Sauce Method: Here is where I admit I am no butchering expert.  I watched some YouTube videos of prepping eel, but the people in the videos are VERY adept with a knife.  So...I took about 30 minutes to do a sloppier job of what the guys in the video did in about 60 seconds.  To prep, gut it, get the bones out, cut in half lengthwise, then cut into 4" steaks.  Leave the skin on - it will help while grilling. Start your grill and turn heat to medium.  While the grill is heating, skewer the steaks. Grill the Eel, skin side down, for three minutes.  Flip and grill another three minutes.  Turn the eel, baste with unagi sauce, and grill one minute skin side.  Flip again, baste with more unagi sauce, and grill one more minute. Until Next Time, Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(40) "dEELicious Flavors for your Summer Grill" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(246) "Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel. Fresh-caught from the rivers that feed into Lake Champlain, eel can be a delicious and unique addition to your summertime grill menu." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(40) "deelicious-flavors-for-your-summer-grill" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 07:26:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 11:26:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5177" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "2" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#367 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5133) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-05-19 10:09:13" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-19 14:09:13" ["post_content"]=> string(3488) " Like many people who live locally, I went to opening day of Burlington's Farmer's Market.  Also like many people, my intentions for being there were to score some local produce, people watch, and admire local handiwork.  My intentions were NOT to get a free banana, obviously not local, and a lesson on the banana trade. Upon entering the market, I was greeted by a genial man dressed as a banana.  He handed me a free banana, then delved into a passionate and shocking speech about the banana trade.  If you believe, as I do, in the power of voting with your dollar as a conscientious consumer, whether motivated by humanitarian or environmental causes, I guarantee you will change your banana shopping habits after learning what I have learned.

Shocker #1: INFERTILITY

DBCP, a pesticide introduced in the 1950's, was discovered to cause infertility in males.  Despite this knowledge, DBCP is still widely used for banana crops in developing countries, where the local residents are NOT educated on the danger of its use.

Shocker #1: MONOCULTURE

I don't know how I didn't know this, but bananas are a monoculture in many regions in Central America.  Monocultures lead to plant pathogens, diseases, and unhealthy soils, which leads to the use of dangerous agrocides, industrial fertilizers, and even extinction.

Shocker #2: TERRORISM

It's a long story, which you can learn for yourself in the documentary, Bananaland, but the cliff notes version is: the fruit company, Chiquita, knowingly funds registered terrorist groups in direct relationship to growing banana crops.

What we can do about it:

  • Buy organic
  • Buy fair trade
  • Tell your friends
What should you do with your fair trade, organic bananas? Make these tasty Gluten Free Banana Oatmeal Pancakes! *Side note: Burlington Farmer's Market has temporarily moved to 345 Pine Street Resources: Peace and Justice Center, Food Empowerment Project, Center for Science in the Public Interest Until next time, Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(40) "Go Bananas at Burlington Farmer's Market" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(183) "Vote with your dollar! Buy organic and buy fair trade! Make conscientious food choices after learning the shocking history of bananas. Gluten free banana pancake recipe included. " ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(39) "go-bananas-at-burlington-farmers-market" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-05-19 10:31:17" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-19 14:31:17" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5133" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "3" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#279 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5116) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-05-05 08:37:37" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-05 12:37:37" ["post_content"]=> string(3568) " Picture yourself learning the art of cheese making with renowned cheese maker, David Asher, or foraging for mushrooms in the beautiful rolling hills of the Northeast Kingdom, or learning the art of fermentation by the self-proclaimed "fermentation fetishist," Sandor Katz.  The School of the New American Farmstead (SNAF) at Sterling College offers you these experiences and more; visit their website for a full list of courses, and their press release for more information on the program. Be a lifelong learner!  Here's five great reasons why:

Community building

Trying new things and learning new skills as an adult scrounges up some vulnerability you probably don't experience in the rest of life.  In the midst of an online world, where social connections are often limited to virtual interactions, create real, human connections by engaging with other people in a curious and like-minded environment.

Knowledge can never be taken away from you

I was told this sentiment by a colleague, and it's true!  Your knowledge belongs to you; no one and nothing can take it from you. Pretty much everything else about you can be taken, tarnished, or damaged.  But your knowledge is yours to keep.

Ignorance may be bliss, but KNOWLEDGE is POWER

I don't disagree that ignorance may be bliss, but you would have to not know too many things to make that true.  Who wants to live their life with the knowledge and understanding of a toddler?  Armor yourself with knowledge, such that you will be prepared to have positive impact on the world around you.

Do your morning business in a tree-outhouse

If you go to SNAF, that is.  Sterling College offers rustic accommodations for a marginal fee.  Space is limited, so if this interests you, let them know!  Regardless, you get to enjoy the wild and untamed scenic experience of the Northeast Kingdom.

Resist entropy

There is no magic pill that will keep your skin and body youthful, but exercising your mental acuity will battle the deleterious effects of aging.  It will also build your self-confidence through the sense of accomplishment, and confidence is a survival skill. See you in class! -Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(43) "Five Reasons to Pursue Continuing Education" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(43) "five-reasons-to-pursue-continuing-education" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-05-05 08:40:37" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-05 12:40:37" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5116" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "3" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#372 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5217) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 08:56:19" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 12:56:19" ["post_content"]=> string(5936) " October brings a tapestry of fall colors across our Vermont landscapes with yellows, orange and red blazes.  And on almost every door stoop or walkway, pumpkins sit proudly clamoring to be noticed.  I’m always struck by the fact that it seems way too early to put pumpkins out as Halloween is thirty-one days away.  Won’t they be rotten by then?  As I watch more and more pumpkins all shapes and sizes grace front steps, walkways, and roadside stands, I’m determined not to give in this early - why rush things? A week ago, I caved, and bought our family pumpkin which now sits proudly on our front stoop. This year I went for a Cinderella pumpkin, which was one of the most popular and common pumpkins grown in France in the 1800’s.  It’s short and ornamental and bears little resemblance to your traditional taller and smoother Jack- o -Lantern pumpkin.  Cinderella pumpkins are known more for their beauty and the flesh is somewhat sweet and its flavor very subtle. After further research, I discovered that there are British pumpkins, Chinese, Indian and even Australian pumpkins- all somewhat different and something I had never given much thought. Every country appears to have their version of pumpkins. My favorite part of a pumpkin is hands down the seeds that you roast in the oven for about thirty to forty-five minutes until they are dry and then tossed with salt. I usually enjoy them this simple and easy way.  For a sweeter taste, you can toss the seeds with cinnamon and sugar. For a spicier flavor, toss with smoked paprika or a garam masala mix. Extracting the seeds from the slimy flesh and lining them in a single layer on a lightly oiled baking sheet can be messy but worth the work. Pumpkins are one of the most nutritional foods, loaded with anti-oxidants disease-fighting vitamins, they are considered a Superfood that provide a good source of Vitamin A and C. With an abundance of orange pumpkins available I was determined to create a few dishes. Never a big fan of pumpkin pie, I sought other options. On a recent October weekend, I returned to the quaint cottage, Bryn Teg, with Bronwyn with two recipes in hand- one for Curried Pumpkin Soup and the other, Best Ever Pumpkin Muffins.   In the charming kitchen with a view of an expansive landscape ablaze in color, I made the soup.  And I was reminded of an important lesson - not all recipes you find on the internet are always accurate.  As I questioned the four cups of water listed in the ingredients, I reluctantly decided to only add two cups and even then, the soup lacked flavor. With Bronwyn at my side, we managed to salvage the recipe adding more spices and pumpkin to create the most delicious pumpkin soup, - a new version that is now ours to claim.   The muffins were gluten free as I substituted almond flour hoping it would not impact the outcome.  It worked.   They turned out lighter and delicious and for someone who does not typically like muffins – I loved these – a recipe from the Lovely Little Kitchen, modified slightly. We roasted the seeds and ate them like candy.  When I returned home, I went immediately to the Common Roots Farmstand nearby and purchased several more pumpkins to make more roasted seeds.  I highly suggest that before you toss your pumpkins into the compost bin, extract the seeds and roast them! Pumpkins continue to appear everywhere- loaded up on carts at markets, gracing the entrance to farm stands, on roadsides with handmade signs and on our stoops.  Recently at the market, I stood behind a lady who had one Jack-o Lantern on the grocery belt with 3 packages of stencils and tools to carve pumpkins.   I reminisced the days we carved spooky and goofy faces with our young children. Carving pumpkins is fun for all ages and I need to get a Jack- O Lantern before Halloween. As we move closer to November, our brightly colored mums begin to fade, and our pumpkins become softer, I hope you will create something in your kitchen.   A hearty soup, muffins, a pumpkin cheesecake or roasted seeds are a few suggestions.  And beware that if a recipe doesn’t seem right- trust your instincts.   My attitude towards pumpkins has shifted – they are not just for décor and carving spooky faces but offer us a healthy colorful food to enjoy in a multitude of ways. Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight, turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends! -Laurie Caswell Burke" ["post_title"]=> string(32) "Pumpkins of all shapes and sizes" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(258) "Pumpkins are part of autumn tapestry, brightly colored and proudly clamoring to be noticed on stoops, walkways, and farmstand displays.  Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends! " ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(32) "pumpkins-of-all-shapes-and-sizes" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-10-31 17:04:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-10-31 21:04:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5217" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "6" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["queried_object"]=> object(WP_Term)#370 (16) { ["term_id"]=> int(1) ["name"]=> string(4) "blog" ["slug"]=> string(4) "blog" ["term_group"]=> int(0) ["term_taxonomy_id"]=> int(1) ["taxonomy"]=> string(8) "category" ["description"]=> string(0) "" ["parent"]=> int(0) ["count"]=> int(164) ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["cat_ID"]=> int(1) ["category_count"]=> int(164) ["category_description"]=> string(0) "" ["cat_name"]=> string(4) "blog" ["category_nicename"]=> string(4) "blog" ["category_parent"]=> int(0) } ["queried_object_id"]=> int(1) }
SUBSCRIBE TO THIS BLOG’S FEED

6 responses to “Pumpkins of all shapes and sizes”

  1. Kate Burke says:

    Great job! I loved the pumpkin soup.

  2. Thanks, Kate. We had a lot of fun “saving it” after the recipe glitch!

  3. Janet says:

    Send the soup to Boston, please. Yummmm.

  4. I love this article so much and all of the enthusiasm for the simple joys Autumn in New England that the pumpkin season brings! A stop at Lucky Finn’s for a Pumpkin Latte in Scituate MA has become routine twice a week until pumpkins fade into the new season…. Julia Child’s Baked in a Pumpkin Soup with luscious Gruyere and fresh breadcrumbs is a favorite — and freezes well too!
    Always love Laurie’s recipes and am enjoying this blog!

  5. Dear Anne, Thank you so much! And that pumpkin latte sounds really good!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


 

Three New Must-Haves For Your Spice Cabinet

When I asked a friend from India if she would give me some recipes, she generously made me mountains of delicious homemade Indian food.  But you know the adage, give a man fish vs teaching him to fish – I wanted to know how to make it myself!

I asked her to join me in my new kitchen (yes, NEW! We just bought our first home!)  While teaching me to cook, she told me about her childhood in India, how strictly she and her friends do or don’t follow tradition, and her family and friends.  I love hearing people’s stories.  The world becomes both smaller and larger at the same time, and these are things you can’t learn by just reading a recipe.

And now, I have three new must-haves for my kitchen repertoire!

#1. Cumin Seeds

I regularly keep ground cumin on hand, but cumin seeds take it to a whole new level.  They are best used by heating oil in a pan, then stir in cumin seeds until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  It’s that easy! Continue making your meal/following your recipe as planned.  Don’t worry – there are no hard to chew seeds or husks in the end result.

Don’t know where to start? Try the basic curry recipe below!

#2. Garam Masala

Garam masala is a blend of many spices that are toasted prior to being ground together.  The name means “warming spices,” not by adding spicy heat, but because in Ayurvedic medicine, these spices “warm” the body, meaning they are said to increase the metabolism.

Typical spices included, though there are multiple variations, and this list is not comprehensive: coriander, cumin, cardamom pods, cloves, peppercorn, star anise, turmeric, and fennel.

#3. Ginger-Garlic Paste

Easy and delicious, this aromatic blend is perfect for cooking meat.

To make – add equal parts fresh ginger and garlic, plus a sprinkle of turmeric, purée in a blender or food processor.  Store in an air tight container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.

Chicken or Chickpea Curry

Ingredients:

1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil

1 Onion

1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds

2 Tomatoes

1 1/2 lb Chicken or 1-2 cans garbanzo beans

Garlic and Ginger Purée (see method above)

Spices to taste: garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, and either red chili or cayenne if you like some heat

Method:

Heat olive oil in a large pan over medium heat.  While pan is heating, dice an onion.  Add cumin seeds to pan, and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Add onion and sprinkle with salt.  Stir occasionally until onion is cooked through (about 12 minutes).  While onion is cooking, dice two tomatoes and cut chicken into cubes.  Add tomato and stir gently for 30 seconds.  Add chicken or chickpeas and a generous spoonful of garlic and ginger puree.  Cook uncovered until “raw” smell is gone.  Cover and cook until almost done, stirring occasionally.  Uncover and stir in garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, cayenne, and salt to taste.  Cook until done.  Right before removing from heat, add small handful of chopped cilantro and stir until wilted.

Jeera Rice (Coriander Rice)

Ingredients:

1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil

1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds

Handful Fresh Cilantro

Salt to taste

1 cup rice

2 cup water or broth

Method:

Heat olive oil in a small pan.  Add cumin seeds and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Meanwhile, chop a small bunch of cilantro.  Add to cumin and oil and stir until wilted and coated with olive oil (about 15 seconds).  Add cumin and cilantro mix, plus salt to taste, to whatever vessel you plan to cook your rice with.  Prepare rice the same as you normally would (we use our pressure cooker).

Posted: 7-14-2019

object(WP_Query)#941 (53) {
  ["query_vars"]=>
  array(63) {
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["error"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["m"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["p"]=>
    int(0)
    ["post_parent"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["name"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["pagename"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["page_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["second"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["minute"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["hour"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["day"]=>
    int(0)
    ["monthnum"]=>
    int(0)
    ["year"]=>
    int(0)
    ["w"]=>
    int(0)
    ["tag"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["cat"]=>
    int(1)
    ["tag_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author_name"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["feed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["tb"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["paged"]=>
    int(0)
    ["meta_key"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["meta_value"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["preview"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["s"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["sentence"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["title"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["fields"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["menu_order"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["embed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["category__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_name__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["ignore_sticky_posts"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["suppress_filters"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["cache_results"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_term_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["lazy_load_term_meta"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_meta_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["post_type"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["posts_per_page"]=>
    int(5)
    ["nopaging"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["comments_per_page"]=>
    string(2) "50"
    ["no_found_rows"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["order"]=>
    string(4) "DESC"
  }
  ["tax_query"]=>
  object(WP_Tax_Query)#373 (6) {
    ["queries"]=>
    array(1) {
      [0]=>
      array(5) {
        ["taxonomy"]=>
        string(8) "category"
        ["terms"]=>
        array(1) {
          [0]=>
          string(4) "blog"
        }
        ["field"]=>
        string(4) "slug"
        ["operator"]=>
        string(2) "IN"
        ["include_children"]=>
        bool(true)
      }
    }
    ["relation"]=>
    string(3) "AND"
    ["table_aliases:protected"]=>
    array(1) {
      [0]=>
      string(21) "wp_term_relationships"
    }
    ["queried_terms"]=>
    array(1) {
      ["category"]=>
      array(2) {
        ["terms"]=>
        array(1) {
          [0]=>
          string(4) "blog"
        }
        ["field"]=>
        string(4) "slug"
      }
    }
    ["primary_table"]=>
    string(8) "wp_posts"
    ["primary_id_column"]=>
    string(2) "ID"
  }
  ["meta_query"]=>
  object(WP_Meta_Query)#374 (9) {
    ["queries"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["relation"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["table_aliases:protected"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["clauses:protected"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["has_or_relation:protected"]=>
    bool(false)
  }
  ["date_query"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["post_count"]=>
  int(5)
  ["current_post"]=>
  int(1)
  ["in_the_loop"]=>
  bool(true)
  ["comment_count"]=>
  int(6)
  ["current_comment"]=>
  int(-1)
  ["found_posts"]=>
  string(3) "121"
  ["max_num_pages"]=>
  float(25)
  ["max_num_comment_pages"]=>
  int(0)
  ["is_single"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_preview"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_page"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_archive"]=>
  bool(true)
  ["is_date"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_year"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_month"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_day"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_time"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_author"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_category"]=>
  bool(true)
  ["is_tag"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_tax"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_search"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_feed"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_comment_feed"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_trackback"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_home"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_404"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_embed"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_paged"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_admin"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_attachment"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_singular"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_robots"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_posts_page"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_post_type_archive"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["query_vars_hash:private"]=>
  string(32) "b239cec030b7b08e2301315b28070261"
  ["query_vars_changed:private"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["thumbnails_cached"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["stopwords:private"]=>
  NULL
  ["compat_fields:private"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(15) "query_vars_hash"
    [1]=>
    string(18) "query_vars_changed"
  }
  ["compat_methods:private"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(16) "init_query_flags"
    [1]=>
    string(15) "parse_tax_query"
  }
  ["query"]=>
  array(1) {
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
  }
  ["request"]=>
  string(341) "SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS  wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts  LEFT JOIN wp_term_relationships ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_term_relationships.object_id) WHERE 1=1  AND ( 
  wp_term_relationships.term_taxonomy_id IN (1)
) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post' AND (wp_posts.post_status = 'publish') GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 5"
  ["posts"]=>
  &array(5) {
    [0]=>
    object(WP_Post)#372 (24) {
      ["ID"]=>
      int(5217)
      ["post_author"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_date"]=>
      string(19) "2019-10-27 08:56:19"
      ["post_date_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-10-27 12:56:19"
      ["post_content"]=>
      string(5936) "

October brings a tapestry of fall colors across our Vermont landscapes with yellows, orange and red blazes.  And on almost every door stoop or walkway, pumpkins sit proudly clamoring to be noticed.  I’m always struck by the fact that it seems way too early to put pumpkins out as Halloween is thirty-one days away.  Won’t they be rotten by then?  As I watch more and more pumpkins all shapes and sizes grace front steps, walkways, and roadside stands, I’m determined not to give in this early - why rush things?

A week ago, I caved, and bought our family pumpkin which now sits proudly on our front stoop. This year I went for a Cinderella pumpkin, which was one of the most popular and common pumpkins grown in France in the 1800’s.  It’s short and ornamental and bears little resemblance to your traditional taller and smoother Jack- o -Lantern pumpkin.  Cinderella pumpkins are known more for their beauty and the flesh is somewhat sweet and its flavor very subtle.



After further research, I discovered that there are British pumpkins, Chinese, Indian and even Australian pumpkins- all somewhat different and something I had never given much thought.

Every country appears to have their version of pumpkins.

My favorite part of a pumpkin is hands down the seeds that you roast in the oven for about thirty to forty-five minutes until they are dry and then tossed with salt. I usually enjoy them this simple and easy way.  For a sweeter taste, you can toss the seeds with cinnamon and sugar. For a spicier flavor, toss with smoked paprika or a garam masala mix. Extracting the seeds from the slimy flesh and lining them in a single layer on a lightly oiled baking sheet can be messy but worth the work.



Pumpkins are one of the most nutritional foods, loaded with anti-oxidants disease-fighting vitamins, they are considered a Superfood that provide a good source of Vitamin A and C.

With an abundance of orange pumpkins available I was determined to create a few dishes. Never a big fan of pumpkin pie, I sought other options. On a recent October weekend, I returned to the quaint cottage, Bryn Teg, with Bronwyn with two recipes in hand- one for Curried Pumpkin Soup and the other, Best Ever Pumpkin Muffins.   In the charming kitchen with a view of an expansive landscape ablaze in color, I made the soup.  And I was reminded of an important lesson - not all recipes you find on the internet are always accurate.  As I questioned the four cups of water listed in the ingredients, I reluctantly decided to only add two cups and even then, the soup lacked flavor.



With Bronwyn at my side, we managed to salvage the recipe adding more spices and pumpkin to create the most delicious pumpkin soup, - a new version that is now ours to claim.   The muffins were gluten free as I substituted almond flour hoping it would not impact the outcome.  It worked.   They turned out lighter and delicious and for someone who does not typically like muffins – I loved these – a recipe from the Lovely Little Kitchen, modified slightly.

We roasted the seeds and ate them like candy.  When I returned home, I went immediately to the Common Roots Farmstand nearby and purchased several more pumpkins to make more roasted seeds.  I highly suggest that before you toss your pumpkins into the compost bin, extract the seeds and roast them!



Pumpkins continue to appear everywhere- loaded up on carts at markets, gracing the entrance to farm stands, on roadsides with handmade signs and on our stoops.  Recently at the market, I stood behind a lady who had one Jack-o Lantern on the grocery belt with 3 packages of stencils and tools to carve pumpkins.   I reminisced the days we carved spooky and goofy faces with our young children. Carving pumpkins is fun for all ages and I need to get a Jack- O Lantern before Halloween.

As we move closer to November, our brightly colored mums begin to fade, and our pumpkins become softer, I hope you will create something in your kitchen.   A hearty soup, muffins, a pumpkin cheesecake or roasted seeds are a few suggestions.  And beware that if a recipe doesn’t seem right- trust your instincts.   My attitude towards pumpkins has shifted – they are not just for décor and carving spooky faces but offer us a healthy colorful food to enjoy in a multitude of ways.

Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight, turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends!

-Laurie Caswell Burke"
      ["post_title"]=>
      string(32) "Pumpkins of all shapes and sizes"
      ["post_excerpt"]=>
      string(258) "Pumpkins are part of autumn tapestry, brightly colored and proudly clamoring to be noticed on stoops, walkways, and farmstand displays.   Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends!  "
      ["post_status"]=>
      string(7) "publish"
      ["comment_status"]=>
      string(4) "open"
      ["ping_status"]=>
      string(4) "open"
      ["post_password"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_name"]=>
      string(32) "pumpkins-of-all-shapes-and-sizes"
      ["to_ping"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["pinged"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_modified"]=>
      string(19) "2019-10-31 17:04:48"
      ["post_modified_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-10-31 21:04:48"
      ["post_content_filtered"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_parent"]=>
      int(0)
      ["guid"]=>
      string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5217"
      ["menu_order"]=>
      int(0)
      ["post_type"]=>
      string(4) "post"
      ["post_mime_type"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["comment_count"]=>
      string(1) "6"
      ["filter"]=>
      string(3) "raw"
    }
    [1]=>
    object(WP_Post)#371 (24) {
      ["ID"]=>
      int(5184)
      ["post_author"]=>
      string(1) "8"
      ["post_date"]=>
      string(19) "2019-07-14 08:29:30"
      ["post_date_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-07-14 12:29:30"
      ["post_content"]=>
      string(4611) "

When I asked a friend from India if she would give me some recipes, she generously made me mountains of delicious homemade Indian food.  But you know the adage, give a man fish vs teaching him to fish - I wanted to know how to make it myself!

I asked her to join me in my new kitchen (yes, NEW! We just bought our first home!)  While teaching me to cook, she told me about her childhood in India, how strictly she and her friends do or don't follow tradition, and her family and friends.  I love hearing people's stories.  The world becomes both smaller and larger at the same time, and these are things you can't learn by just reading a recipe.

And now, I have three new must-haves for my kitchen repertoire!



#1. Cumin Seeds

I regularly keep ground cumin on hand, but cumin seeds take it to a whole new level.  They are best used by heating oil in a pan, then stir in cumin seeds until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  It's that easy! Continue making your meal/following your recipe as planned.  Don't worry - there are no hard to chew seeds or husks in the end result.

Don't know where to start? Try the basic curry recipe below!

#2. Garam Masala

Garam masala is a blend of many spices that are toasted prior to being ground together.  The name means "warming spices," not by adding spicy heat, but because in Ayurvedic medicine, these spices "warm" the body, meaning they are said to increase the metabolism.

Typical spices included, though there are multiple variations, and this list is not comprehensive: coriander, cumin, cardamom pods, cloves, peppercorn, star anise, turmeric, and fennel.

#3. Ginger-Garlic Paste

Easy and delicious, this aromatic blend is perfect for cooking meat.

To make - add equal parts fresh ginger and garlic, plus a sprinkle of turmeric, purée in a blender or food processor.  Store in an air tight container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.



Chicken or Chickpea Curry

Ingredients:

1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil

1 Onion

1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds

2 Tomatoes

1 1/2 lb Chicken or 1-2 cans garbanzo beans

Garlic and Ginger Purée (see method above)

Spices to taste: garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, and either red chili or cayenne if you like some heat

Method:

Heat olive oil in a large pan over medium heat.  While pan is heating, dice an onion.  Add cumin seeds to pan, and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Add onion and sprinkle with salt.  Stir occasionally until onion is cooked through (about 12 minutes).  While onion is cooking, dice two tomatoes and cut chicken into cubes.  Add tomato and stir gently for 30 seconds.  Add chicken or chickpeas and a generous spoonful of garlic and ginger puree.  Cook uncovered until "raw" smell is gone.  Cover and cook until almost done, stirring occasionally.  Uncover and stir in garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, cayenne, and salt to taste.  Cook until done.  Right before removing from heat, add small handful of chopped cilantro and stir until wilted.

Jeera Rice (Coriander Rice)

Ingredients:

1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil

1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds

Handful Fresh Cilantro

Salt to taste

1 cup rice

2 cup water or broth

Method:

Heat olive oil in a small pan.  Add cumin seeds and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Meanwhile, chop a small bunch of cilantro.  Add to cumin and oil and stir until wilted and coated with olive oil (about 15 seconds).  Add cumin and cilantro mix, plus salt to taste, to whatever vessel you plan to cook your rice with.  Prepare rice the same as you normally would (we use our pressure cooker)."
      ["post_title"]=>
      string(43) "Three New Must-Haves For Your Spice Cabinet"
      ["post_excerpt"]=>
      string(186) "Add spice to your life by including these three new flavors to your list of kitchen essentials.  Inspired by Indian cooking, these ingredients are versatile and tasty - recipes included!"
      ["post_status"]=>
      string(7) "publish"
      ["comment_status"]=>
      string(4) "open"
      ["ping_status"]=>
      string(4) "open"
      ["post_password"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_name"]=>
      string(43) "three-new-must-haves-for-your-spice-cabinet"
      ["to_ping"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["pinged"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_modified"]=>
      string(19) "2019-07-14 08:30:01"
      ["post_modified_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-07-14 12:30:01"
      ["post_content_filtered"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_parent"]=>
      int(0)
      ["guid"]=>
      string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5184"
      ["menu_order"]=>
      int(0)
      ["post_type"]=>
      string(4) "post"
      ["post_mime_type"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["comment_count"]=>
      string(1) "4"
      ["filter"]=>
      string(3) "raw"
    }
    [2]=>
    object(WP_Post)#368 (24) {
      ["ID"]=>
      int(5177)
      ["post_author"]=>
      string(1) "8"
      ["post_date"]=>
      string(19) "2019-06-14 07:26:48"
      ["post_date_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-06-14 11:26:48"
      ["post_content"]=>
      string(3807) "

Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel.

Don't turn your nose up just yet - if you love the combination of sweet & salty in your juicy BBQ Chicken, you'll love BBQ Eel.  Follow the recipe below! One of my favorite dishes at a sushi restaurant is Unagi, which is a fancy way of saying BBQ eel.  I was inspired to make my own after a colleague told me you can fish for eels in the rivers that feed into Lake Champlagne.  Someday I hope to catch my own, but the one used for this meal was a caught by my colleague. I was a squeamish child and young adult, squealing over spiders, bugs, and slimy things.  This squeamishness led to my vegetarian lifestyle, which I practiced for the better part of 10 years, because I struggled in associating my food with the animals the food came from.  You can read more about my food history here if it interests you.  Currently, I would describe my food lifestyle as holistic, non-wasting, DIY, and authentically/locally sourced. The 17 year-old girl in me would have a small heart attack to know she would grow into the woman I am today: butchering and grilling whole, slimy eels.  Eel is rich with omega-3 fatty acids, as well as other good for you vitamins and minerals.  If starting from scratch does not appeal to you, you can find prepared unagi in the frozen meat section of most Asian grocery stores. Find the comprehensive recipe list and serving suggestions here.

BBQ Eel

Ingredients: 1 lb Freshwater Eel 1 cup Unagi Sauce Method: Here is where I admit I am no butchering expert.  I watched some YouTube videos of prepping eel, but the people in the videos are VERY adept with a knife.  So...I took about 30 minutes to do a sloppier job of what the guys in the video did in about 60 seconds.  To prep, gut it, get the bones out, cut in half lengthwise, then cut into 4" steaks.  Leave the skin on - it will help while grilling. Start your grill and turn heat to medium.  While the grill is heating, skewer the steaks. Grill the Eel, skin side down, for three minutes.  Flip and grill another three minutes.  Turn the eel, baste with unagi sauce, and grill one minute skin side.  Flip again, baste with more unagi sauce, and grill one more minute. Until Next Time, Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(40) "dEELicious Flavors for your Summer Grill" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(246) "Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel. Fresh-caught from the rivers that feed into Lake Champlain, eel can be a delicious and unique addition to your summertime grill menu." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(40) "deelicious-flavors-for-your-summer-grill" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 07:26:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 11:26:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5177" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "2" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#367 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5133) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-05-19 10:09:13" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-19 14:09:13" ["post_content"]=> string(3488) " Like many people who live locally, I went to opening day of Burlington's Farmer's Market.  Also like many people, my intentions for being there were to score some local produce, people watch, and admire local handiwork.  My intentions were NOT to get a free banana, obviously not local, and a lesson on the banana trade. Upon entering the market, I was greeted by a genial man dressed as a banana.  He handed me a free banana, then delved into a passionate and shocking speech about the banana trade.  If you believe, as I do, in the power of voting with your dollar as a conscientious consumer, whether motivated by humanitarian or environmental causes, I guarantee you will change your banana shopping habits after learning what I have learned.

Shocker #1: INFERTILITY

DBCP, a pesticide introduced in the 1950's, was discovered to cause infertility in males.  Despite this knowledge, DBCP is still widely used for banana crops in developing countries, where the local residents are NOT educated on the danger of its use.

Shocker #1: MONOCULTURE

I don't know how I didn't know this, but bananas are a monoculture in many regions in Central America.  Monocultures lead to plant pathogens, diseases, and unhealthy soils, which leads to the use of dangerous agrocides, industrial fertilizers, and even extinction.

Shocker #2: TERRORISM

It's a long story, which you can learn for yourself in the documentary, Bananaland, but the cliff notes version is: the fruit company, Chiquita, knowingly funds registered terrorist groups in direct relationship to growing banana crops.

What we can do about it:

  • Buy organic
  • Buy fair trade
  • Tell your friends
What should you do with your fair trade, organic bananas? Make these tasty Gluten Free Banana Oatmeal Pancakes! *Side note: Burlington Farmer's Market has temporarily moved to 345 Pine Street Resources: Peace and Justice Center, Food Empowerment Project, Center for Science in the Public Interest Until next time, Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(40) "Go Bananas at Burlington Farmer's Market" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(183) "Vote with your dollar! Buy organic and buy fair trade! Make conscientious food choices after learning the shocking history of bananas. Gluten free banana pancake recipe included. " ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(39) "go-bananas-at-burlington-farmers-market" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-05-19 10:31:17" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-19 14:31:17" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5133" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "3" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#279 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5116) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-05-05 08:37:37" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-05 12:37:37" ["post_content"]=> string(3568) " Picture yourself learning the art of cheese making with renowned cheese maker, David Asher, or foraging for mushrooms in the beautiful rolling hills of the Northeast Kingdom, or learning the art of fermentation by the self-proclaimed "fermentation fetishist," Sandor Katz.  The School of the New American Farmstead (SNAF) at Sterling College offers you these experiences and more; visit their website for a full list of courses, and their press release for more information on the program. Be a lifelong learner!  Here's five great reasons why:

Community building

Trying new things and learning new skills as an adult scrounges up some vulnerability you probably don't experience in the rest of life.  In the midst of an online world, where social connections are often limited to virtual interactions, create real, human connections by engaging with other people in a curious and like-minded environment.

Knowledge can never be taken away from you

I was told this sentiment by a colleague, and it's true!  Your knowledge belongs to you; no one and nothing can take it from you. Pretty much everything else about you can be taken, tarnished, or damaged.  But your knowledge is yours to keep.

Ignorance may be bliss, but KNOWLEDGE is POWER

I don't disagree that ignorance may be bliss, but you would have to not know too many things to make that true.  Who wants to live their life with the knowledge and understanding of a toddler?  Armor yourself with knowledge, such that you will be prepared to have positive impact on the world around you.

Do your morning business in a tree-outhouse

If you go to SNAF, that is.  Sterling College offers rustic accommodations for a marginal fee.  Space is limited, so if this interests you, let them know!  Regardless, you get to enjoy the wild and untamed scenic experience of the Northeast Kingdom.

Resist entropy

There is no magic pill that will keep your skin and body youthful, but exercising your mental acuity will battle the deleterious effects of aging.  It will also build your self-confidence through the sense of accomplishment, and confidence is a survival skill. See you in class! -Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(43) "Five Reasons to Pursue Continuing Education" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(43) "five-reasons-to-pursue-continuing-education" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-05-05 08:40:37" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-05 12:40:37" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5116" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "3" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#371 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5184) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 08:29:30" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 12:29:30" ["post_content"]=> string(4611) " When I asked a friend from India if she would give me some recipes, she generously made me mountains of delicious homemade Indian food.  But you know the adage, give a man fish vs teaching him to fish - I wanted to know how to make it myself! I asked her to join me in my new kitchen (yes, NEW! We just bought our first home!)  While teaching me to cook, she told me about her childhood in India, how strictly she and her friends do or don't follow tradition, and her family and friends.  I love hearing people's stories.  The world becomes both smaller and larger at the same time, and these are things you can't learn by just reading a recipe. And now, I have three new must-haves for my kitchen repertoire! #1. Cumin Seeds I regularly keep ground cumin on hand, but cumin seeds take it to a whole new level.  They are best used by heating oil in a pan, then stir in cumin seeds until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  It's that easy! Continue making your meal/following your recipe as planned.  Don't worry - there are no hard to chew seeds or husks in the end result. Don't know where to start? Try the basic curry recipe below! #2. Garam Masala Garam masala is a blend of many spices that are toasted prior to being ground together.  The name means "warming spices," not by adding spicy heat, but because in Ayurvedic medicine, these spices "warm" the body, meaning they are said to increase the metabolism. Typical spices included, though there are multiple variations, and this list is not comprehensive: coriander, cumin, cardamom pods, cloves, peppercorn, star anise, turmeric, and fennel. #3. Ginger-Garlic Paste Easy and delicious, this aromatic blend is perfect for cooking meat. To make - add equal parts fresh ginger and garlic, plus a sprinkle of turmeric, purée in a blender or food processor.  Store in an air tight container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. Chicken or Chickpea Curry Ingredients: 1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil 1 Onion 1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds 2 Tomatoes 1 1/2 lb Chicken or 1-2 cans garbanzo beans Garlic and Ginger Purée (see method above) Spices to taste: garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, and either red chili or cayenne if you like some heat Method: Heat olive oil in a large pan over medium heat.  While pan is heating, dice an onion.  Add cumin seeds to pan, and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Add onion and sprinkle with salt.  Stir occasionally until onion is cooked through (about 12 minutes).  While onion is cooking, dice two tomatoes and cut chicken into cubes.  Add tomato and stir gently for 30 seconds.  Add chicken or chickpeas and a generous spoonful of garlic and ginger puree.  Cook uncovered until "raw" smell is gone.  Cover and cook until almost done, stirring occasionally.  Uncover and stir in garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, cayenne, and salt to taste.  Cook until done.  Right before removing from heat, add small handful of chopped cilantro and stir until wilted. Jeera Rice (Coriander Rice) Ingredients: 1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil 1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds Handful Fresh Cilantro Salt to taste 1 cup rice 2 cup water or broth Method: Heat olive oil in a small pan.  Add cumin seeds and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Meanwhile, chop a small bunch of cilantro.  Add to cumin and oil and stir until wilted and coated with olive oil (about 15 seconds).  Add cumin and cilantro mix, plus salt to taste, to whatever vessel you plan to cook your rice with.  Prepare rice the same as you normally would (we use our pressure cooker)." ["post_title"]=> string(43) "Three New Must-Haves For Your Spice Cabinet" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(186) "Add spice to your life by including these three new flavors to your list of kitchen essentials. Inspired by Indian cooking, these ingredients are versatile and tasty - recipes included!" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(43) "three-new-must-haves-for-your-spice-cabinet" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 08:30:01" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-14 12:30:01" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5184" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "4" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["queried_object"]=> object(WP_Term)#370 (16) { ["term_id"]=> int(1) ["name"]=> string(4) "blog" ["slug"]=> string(4) "blog" ["term_group"]=> int(0) ["term_taxonomy_id"]=> int(1) ["taxonomy"]=> string(8) "category" ["description"]=> string(0) "" ["parent"]=> int(0) ["count"]=> int(164) ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["cat_ID"]=> int(1) ["category_count"]=> int(164) ["category_description"]=> string(0) "" ["cat_name"]=> string(4) "blog" ["category_nicename"]=> string(4) "blog" ["category_parent"]=> int(0) } ["queried_object_id"]=> int(1) ["comments"]=> array(6) { [0]=> &object(WP_Comment)#234 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208746" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5217" ["comment_author"]=> string(10) "Kate Burke" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "burke_k1@denison.edu" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "73.38.163.183" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 18:47:01" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 22:47:01" ["comment_content"]=> string(36) "Great job! I loved the pumpkin soup." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [1]=> &object(WP_Comment)#243 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208747" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5217" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Bronwyn Dunne" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "bronwyndunne@mac.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(34) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.91.160.255" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 19:25:56" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 23:25:56" ["comment_content"]=> string(70) "Thanks, Kate. We had a lot of fun "saving it" after the recipe glitch!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [2]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1003 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208748" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5217" ["comment_author"]=> string(5) "Janet" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(19) "Nourishnp@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(14) "98.229.161.192" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-03 17:27:47" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-03 21:27:47" ["comment_content"]=> string(40) "Send the soup to Boston, please. Yummmm." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children:protected"]=> array(1) { [208749]=> object(WP_Comment)#1051 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208749" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5217" ["comment_author"]=> string(6) "Laurie" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(35) "bronwyn@inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.91.160.255" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-04 20:14:49" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-05 00:14:49" ["comment_content"]=> string(47) "Laurie says: Good reason to come to Vermont!!!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(6) "208748" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [3]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1051 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208749" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5217" ["comment_author"]=> string(6) "Laurie" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(35) "bronwyn@inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.91.160.255" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-04 20:14:49" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-05 00:14:49" ["comment_content"]=> string(47) "Laurie says: Good reason to come to Vermont!!!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(6) "208748" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [4]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1053 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208750" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5217" ["comment_author"]=> string(14) "Anne Schroeder" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(29) "annedarginschroeder@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(26) "http://www.andispeople.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "100.0.184.204" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-07 22:11:17" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-08 02:11:17" ["comment_content"]=> string(446) "I love this article so much and all of the enthusiasm for the simple joys Autumn in New England that the pumpkin season brings! A stop at Lucky Finn’s for a Pumpkin Latte in Scituate MA has become routine twice a week until pumpkins fade into the new season.... Julia Child’s Baked in a Pumpkin Soup with luscious Gruyere and fresh breadcrumbs is a favorite — and freezes well too! Always love Laurie’s recipes and am enjoying this blog!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [5]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1052 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208751" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5217" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Bronwyn Dunne" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "bronwyndunne@mac.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(34) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.91.160.255" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-11 22:20:05" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-12 02:20:05" ["comment_content"]=> string(72) "Dear Anne, Thank you so much! And that pumpkin latte sounds really good!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } } ["comments_by_type"]=> array(4) { ["comment"]=> array(6) { [0]=> &object(WP_Comment)#234 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208746" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5217" ["comment_author"]=> string(10) "Kate Burke" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "burke_k1@denison.edu" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "73.38.163.183" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 18:47:01" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 22:47:01" ["comment_content"]=> string(36) "Great job! I loved the pumpkin soup." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [1]=> &object(WP_Comment)#243 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208747" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5217" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Bronwyn Dunne" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "bronwyndunne@mac.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(34) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.91.160.255" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 19:25:56" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-10-27 23:25:56" ["comment_content"]=> string(70) "Thanks, Kate. We had a lot of fun "saving it" after the recipe glitch!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [2]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1003 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208748" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5217" ["comment_author"]=> string(5) "Janet" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(19) "Nourishnp@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(14) "98.229.161.192" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-03 17:27:47" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-03 21:27:47" ["comment_content"]=> string(40) "Send the soup to Boston, please. Yummmm." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children:protected"]=> array(1) { [208749]=> object(WP_Comment)#1051 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208749" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5217" ["comment_author"]=> string(6) "Laurie" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(35) "bronwyn@inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.91.160.255" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-04 20:14:49" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-05 00:14:49" ["comment_content"]=> string(47) "Laurie says: Good reason to come to Vermont!!!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(6) "208748" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [3]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1051 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208749" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5217" ["comment_author"]=> string(6) "Laurie" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(35) "bronwyn@inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.91.160.255" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-04 20:14:49" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-05 00:14:49" ["comment_content"]=> string(47) "Laurie says: Good reason to come to Vermont!!!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(6) "208748" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [4]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1053 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208750" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5217" ["comment_author"]=> string(14) "Anne Schroeder" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(29) "annedarginschroeder@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(26) "http://www.andispeople.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "100.0.184.204" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-07 22:11:17" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-08 02:11:17" ["comment_content"]=> string(446) "I love this article so much and all of the enthusiasm for the simple joys Autumn in New England that the pumpkin season brings! A stop at Lucky Finn’s for a Pumpkin Latte in Scituate MA has become routine twice a week until pumpkins fade into the new season.... Julia Child’s Baked in a Pumpkin Soup with luscious Gruyere and fresh breadcrumbs is a favorite — and freezes well too! Always love Laurie’s recipes and am enjoying this blog!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [5]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1052 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208751" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5217" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Bronwyn Dunne" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "bronwyndunne@mac.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(34) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.91.160.255" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-11-11 22:20:05" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-11-12 02:20:05" ["comment_content"]=> string(72) "Dear Anne, Thank you so much! And that pumpkin latte sounds really good!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } } ["trackback"]=> array(0) { } ["pingback"]=> array(0) { } ["pings"]=> array(0) { } } }
SUBSCRIBE TO THIS BLOG’S FEED

4 responses to “Three New Must-Haves For Your Spice Cabinet”

  1. This is a great primer on how to cook Indian cuisine and I remember when -many years ago- I invited a neighbor to join me in my newish kitchen so she and I could make an Indian curry together. It was my Indian friend who taught me that curry is not just a single powder that comes out of jar but an assortment of spices….toasting them in a hot pan filled my kitchen with the essence of her native country…such a treat!

    • Corrie Austin says:

      Hello Bronwyn!
      I only recently, a little over a year ago, learned the same about curry not being a single spice. It also helps explain why there is such variance in the flavor. How fun we both have such pivotal experiences in our new kitchens!
      Take care,
      Corrie

  2. Maria Brandriff says:

    When I was in India, I learned that garam masala means “merchant’s spice mix”, so in essence every merchant has his own blend, hence another reason for the variations.

  3. Kellie Kutkey says:

    Ok, if I let the cumin seeds roast in my skillet with oil, then I can use the seeds just like the powder? That sounds amazing!
    Thanks 🙂

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


 

dEELicious Flavors for your Summer Grill

Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel.

Don’t turn your nose up just yet – if you love the combination of sweet & salty in your juicy BBQ Chicken, you’ll love BBQ Eel.  Follow the recipe below!

One of my favorite dishes at a sushi restaurant is Unagi, which is a fancy way of saying BBQ eel.  I was inspired to make my own after a colleague told me you can fish for eels in the rivers that feed into Lake Champlagne.  Someday I hope to catch my own, but the one used for this meal was a caught by my colleague.

I was a squeamish child and young adult, squealing over spiders, bugs, and slimy things.  This squeamishness led to my vegetarian lifestyle, which I practiced for the better part of 10 years, because I struggled in associating my food with the animals the food came from.  You can read more about my food history here if it interests you.  Currently, I would describe my food lifestyle as holistic, non-wasting, DIY, and authentically/locally sourced.

The 17 year-old girl in me would have a small heart attack to know she would grow into the woman I am today: butchering and grilling whole, slimy eels.  Eel is rich with omega-3 fatty acids, as well as other good for you vitamins and minerals.  If starting from scratch does not appeal to you, you can find prepared unagi in the frozen meat section of most Asian grocery stores.

Find the comprehensive recipe list and serving suggestions here.

BBQ Eel

Ingredients:

1 lb Freshwater Eel

1 cup Unagi Sauce

Method:

Here is where I admit I am no butchering expert.  I watched some YouTube videos of prepping eel, but the people in the videos are VERY adept with a knife.  So…I took about 30 minutes to do a sloppier job of what the guys in the video did in about 60 seconds.  To prep, gut it, get the bones out, cut in half lengthwise, then cut into 4″ steaks.  Leave the skin on – it will help while grilling.

Start your grill and turn heat to medium.  While the grill is heating, skewer the steaks.

Grill the Eel, skin side down, for three minutes.  Flip and grill another three minutes.  Turn the eel, baste with unagi sauce, and grill one minute skin side.  Flip again, baste with more unagi sauce, and grill one more minute.

Until Next Time,

Corrie Austin

Posted: 6-14-2019

object(WP_Query)#941 (53) {
  ["query_vars"]=>
  array(63) {
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["error"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["m"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["p"]=>
    int(0)
    ["post_parent"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["name"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["pagename"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["page_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["second"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["minute"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["hour"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["day"]=>
    int(0)
    ["monthnum"]=>
    int(0)
    ["year"]=>
    int(0)
    ["w"]=>
    int(0)
    ["tag"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["cat"]=>
    int(1)
    ["tag_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author_name"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["feed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["tb"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["paged"]=>
    int(0)
    ["meta_key"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["meta_value"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["preview"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["s"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["sentence"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["title"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["fields"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["menu_order"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["embed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["category__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_name__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["ignore_sticky_posts"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["suppress_filters"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["cache_results"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_term_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["lazy_load_term_meta"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_meta_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["post_type"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["posts_per_page"]=>
    int(5)
    ["nopaging"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["comments_per_page"]=>
    string(2) "50"
    ["no_found_rows"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["order"]=>
    string(4) "DESC"
  }
  ["tax_query"]=>
  object(WP_Tax_Query)#373 (6) {
    ["queries"]=>
    array(1) {
      [0]=>
      array(5) {
        ["taxonomy"]=>
        string(8) "category"
        ["terms"]=>
        array(1) {
          [0]=>
          string(4) "blog"
        }
        ["field"]=>
        string(4) "slug"
        ["operator"]=>
        string(2) "IN"
        ["include_children"]=>
        bool(true)
      }
    }
    ["relation"]=>
    string(3) "AND"
    ["table_aliases:protected"]=>
    array(1) {
      [0]=>
      string(21) "wp_term_relationships"
    }
    ["queried_terms"]=>
    array(1) {
      ["category"]=>
      array(2) {
        ["terms"]=>
        array(1) {
          [0]=>
          string(4) "blog"
        }
        ["field"]=>
        string(4) "slug"
      }
    }
    ["primary_table"]=>
    string(8) "wp_posts"
    ["primary_id_column"]=>
    string(2) "ID"
  }
  ["meta_query"]=>
  object(WP_Meta_Query)#374 (9) {
    ["queries"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["relation"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["table_aliases:protected"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["clauses:protected"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["has_or_relation:protected"]=>
    bool(false)
  }
  ["date_query"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["post_count"]=>
  int(5)
  ["current_post"]=>
  int(2)
  ["in_the_loop"]=>
  bool(true)
  ["comment_count"]=>
  int(4)
  ["current_comment"]=>
  int(-1)
  ["found_posts"]=>
  string(3) "121"
  ["max_num_pages"]=>
  float(25)
  ["max_num_comment_pages"]=>
  int(0)
  ["is_single"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_preview"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_page"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_archive"]=>
  bool(true)
  ["is_date"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_year"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_month"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_day"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_time"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_author"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_category"]=>
  bool(true)
  ["is_tag"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_tax"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_search"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_feed"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_comment_feed"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_trackback"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_home"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_404"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_embed"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_paged"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_admin"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_attachment"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_singular"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_robots"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_posts_page"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_post_type_archive"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["query_vars_hash:private"]=>
  string(32) "b239cec030b7b08e2301315b28070261"
  ["query_vars_changed:private"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["thumbnails_cached"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["stopwords:private"]=>
  NULL
  ["compat_fields:private"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(15) "query_vars_hash"
    [1]=>
    string(18) "query_vars_changed"
  }
  ["compat_methods:private"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(16) "init_query_flags"
    [1]=>
    string(15) "parse_tax_query"
  }
  ["query"]=>
  array(1) {
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
  }
  ["request"]=>
  string(341) "SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS  wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts  LEFT JOIN wp_term_relationships ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_term_relationships.object_id) WHERE 1=1  AND ( 
  wp_term_relationships.term_taxonomy_id IN (1)
) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post' AND (wp_posts.post_status = 'publish') GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 5"
  ["posts"]=>
  &array(5) {
    [0]=>
    object(WP_Post)#372 (24) {
      ["ID"]=>
      int(5217)
      ["post_author"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_date"]=>
      string(19) "2019-10-27 08:56:19"
      ["post_date_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-10-27 12:56:19"
      ["post_content"]=>
      string(5936) "

October brings a tapestry of fall colors across our Vermont landscapes with yellows, orange and red blazes.  And on almost every door stoop or walkway, pumpkins sit proudly clamoring to be noticed.  I’m always struck by the fact that it seems way too early to put pumpkins out as Halloween is thirty-one days away.  Won’t they be rotten by then?  As I watch more and more pumpkins all shapes and sizes grace front steps, walkways, and roadside stands, I’m determined not to give in this early - why rush things?

A week ago, I caved, and bought our family pumpkin which now sits proudly on our front stoop. This year I went for a Cinderella pumpkin, which was one of the most popular and common pumpkins grown in France in the 1800’s.  It’s short and ornamental and bears little resemblance to your traditional taller and smoother Jack- o -Lantern pumpkin.  Cinderella pumpkins are known more for their beauty and the flesh is somewhat sweet and its flavor very subtle.



After further research, I discovered that there are British pumpkins, Chinese, Indian and even Australian pumpkins- all somewhat different and something I had never given much thought.

Every country appears to have their version of pumpkins.

My favorite part of a pumpkin is hands down the seeds that you roast in the oven for about thirty to forty-five minutes until they are dry and then tossed with salt. I usually enjoy them this simple and easy way.  For a sweeter taste, you can toss the seeds with cinnamon and sugar. For a spicier flavor, toss with smoked paprika or a garam masala mix. Extracting the seeds from the slimy flesh and lining them in a single layer on a lightly oiled baking sheet can be messy but worth the work.



Pumpkins are one of the most nutritional foods, loaded with anti-oxidants disease-fighting vitamins, they are considered a Superfood that provide a good source of Vitamin A and C.

With an abundance of orange pumpkins available I was determined to create a few dishes. Never a big fan of pumpkin pie, I sought other options. On a recent October weekend, I returned to the quaint cottage, Bryn Teg, with Bronwyn with two recipes in hand- one for Curried Pumpkin Soup and the other, Best Ever Pumpkin Muffins.   In the charming kitchen with a view of an expansive landscape ablaze in color, I made the soup.  And I was reminded of an important lesson - not all recipes you find on the internet are always accurate.  As I questioned the four cups of water listed in the ingredients, I reluctantly decided to only add two cups and even then, the soup lacked flavor.



With Bronwyn at my side, we managed to salvage the recipe adding more spices and pumpkin to create the most delicious pumpkin soup, - a new version that is now ours to claim.   The muffins were gluten free as I substituted almond flour hoping it would not impact the outcome.  It worked.   They turned out lighter and delicious and for someone who does not typically like muffins – I loved these – a recipe from the Lovely Little Kitchen, modified slightly.

We roasted the seeds and ate them like candy.  When I returned home, I went immediately to the Common Roots Farmstand nearby and purchased several more pumpkins to make more roasted seeds.  I highly suggest that before you toss your pumpkins into the compost bin, extract the seeds and roast them!



Pumpkins continue to appear everywhere- loaded up on carts at markets, gracing the entrance to farm stands, on roadsides with handmade signs and on our stoops.  Recently at the market, I stood behind a lady who had one Jack-o Lantern on the grocery belt with 3 packages of stencils and tools to carve pumpkins.   I reminisced the days we carved spooky and goofy faces with our young children. Carving pumpkins is fun for all ages and I need to get a Jack- O Lantern before Halloween.

As we move closer to November, our brightly colored mums begin to fade, and our pumpkins become softer, I hope you will create something in your kitchen.   A hearty soup, muffins, a pumpkin cheesecake or roasted seeds are a few suggestions.  And beware that if a recipe doesn’t seem right- trust your instincts.   My attitude towards pumpkins has shifted – they are not just for décor and carving spooky faces but offer us a healthy colorful food to enjoy in a multitude of ways.

Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight, turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends!

-Laurie Caswell Burke"
      ["post_title"]=>
      string(32) "Pumpkins of all shapes and sizes"
      ["post_excerpt"]=>
      string(258) "Pumpkins are part of autumn tapestry, brightly colored and proudly clamoring to be noticed on stoops, walkways, and farmstand displays.   Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends!  "
      ["post_status"]=>
      string(7) "publish"
      ["comment_status"]=>
      string(4) "open"
      ["ping_status"]=>
      string(4) "open"
      ["post_password"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_name"]=>
      string(32) "pumpkins-of-all-shapes-and-sizes"
      ["to_ping"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["pinged"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_modified"]=>
      string(19) "2019-10-31 17:04:48"
      ["post_modified_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-10-31 21:04:48"
      ["post_content_filtered"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_parent"]=>
      int(0)
      ["guid"]=>
      string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5217"
      ["menu_order"]=>
      int(0)
      ["post_type"]=>
      string(4) "post"
      ["post_mime_type"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["comment_count"]=>
      string(1) "6"
      ["filter"]=>
      string(3) "raw"
    }
    [1]=>
    object(WP_Post)#371 (24) {
      ["ID"]=>
      int(5184)
      ["post_author"]=>
      string(1) "8"
      ["post_date"]=>
      string(19) "2019-07-14 08:29:30"
      ["post_date_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-07-14 12:29:30"
      ["post_content"]=>
      string(4611) "

When I asked a friend from India if she would give me some recipes, she generously made me mountains of delicious homemade Indian food.  But you know the adage, give a man fish vs teaching him to fish - I wanted to know how to make it myself!

I asked her to join me in my new kitchen (yes, NEW! We just bought our first home!)  While teaching me to cook, she told me about her childhood in India, how strictly she and her friends do or don't follow tradition, and her family and friends.  I love hearing people's stories.  The world becomes both smaller and larger at the same time, and these are things you can't learn by just reading a recipe.

And now, I have three new must-haves for my kitchen repertoire!



#1. Cumin Seeds

I regularly keep ground cumin on hand, but cumin seeds take it to a whole new level.  They are best used by heating oil in a pan, then stir in cumin seeds until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  It's that easy! Continue making your meal/following your recipe as planned.  Don't worry - there are no hard to chew seeds or husks in the end result.

Don't know where to start? Try the basic curry recipe below!

#2. Garam Masala

Garam masala is a blend of many spices that are toasted prior to being ground together.  The name means "warming spices," not by adding spicy heat, but because in Ayurvedic medicine, these spices "warm" the body, meaning they are said to increase the metabolism.

Typical spices included, though there are multiple variations, and this list is not comprehensive: coriander, cumin, cardamom pods, cloves, peppercorn, star anise, turmeric, and fennel.

#3. Ginger-Garlic Paste

Easy and delicious, this aromatic blend is perfect for cooking meat.

To make - add equal parts fresh ginger and garlic, plus a sprinkle of turmeric, purée in a blender or food processor.  Store in an air tight container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.



Chicken or Chickpea Curry

Ingredients:

1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil

1 Onion

1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds

2 Tomatoes

1 1/2 lb Chicken or 1-2 cans garbanzo beans

Garlic and Ginger Purée (see method above)

Spices to taste: garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, and either red chili or cayenne if you like some heat

Method:

Heat olive oil in a large pan over medium heat.  While pan is heating, dice an onion.  Add cumin seeds to pan, and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Add onion and sprinkle with salt.  Stir occasionally until onion is cooked through (about 12 minutes).  While onion is cooking, dice two tomatoes and cut chicken into cubes.  Add tomato and stir gently for 30 seconds.  Add chicken or chickpeas and a generous spoonful of garlic and ginger puree.  Cook uncovered until "raw" smell is gone.  Cover and cook until almost done, stirring occasionally.  Uncover and stir in garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, cayenne, and salt to taste.  Cook until done.  Right before removing from heat, add small handful of chopped cilantro and stir until wilted.

Jeera Rice (Coriander Rice)

Ingredients:

1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil

1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds

Handful Fresh Cilantro

Salt to taste

1 cup rice

2 cup water or broth

Method:

Heat olive oil in a small pan.  Add cumin seeds and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Meanwhile, chop a small bunch of cilantro.  Add to cumin and oil and stir until wilted and coated with olive oil (about 15 seconds).  Add cumin and cilantro mix, plus salt to taste, to whatever vessel you plan to cook your rice with.  Prepare rice the same as you normally would (we use our pressure cooker)."
      ["post_title"]=>
      string(43) "Three New Must-Haves For Your Spice Cabinet"
      ["post_excerpt"]=>
      string(186) "Add spice to your life by including these three new flavors to your list of kitchen essentials.  Inspired by Indian cooking, these ingredients are versatile and tasty - recipes included!"
      ["post_status"]=>
      string(7) "publish"
      ["comment_status"]=>
      string(4) "open"
      ["ping_status"]=>
      string(4) "open"
      ["post_password"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_name"]=>
      string(43) "three-new-must-haves-for-your-spice-cabinet"
      ["to_ping"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["pinged"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_modified"]=>
      string(19) "2019-07-14 08:30:01"
      ["post_modified_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-07-14 12:30:01"
      ["post_content_filtered"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_parent"]=>
      int(0)
      ["guid"]=>
      string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5184"
      ["menu_order"]=>
      int(0)
      ["post_type"]=>
      string(4) "post"
      ["post_mime_type"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["comment_count"]=>
      string(1) "4"
      ["filter"]=>
      string(3) "raw"
    }
    [2]=>
    object(WP_Post)#368 (24) {
      ["ID"]=>
      int(5177)
      ["post_author"]=>
      string(1) "8"
      ["post_date"]=>
      string(19) "2019-06-14 07:26:48"
      ["post_date_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-06-14 11:26:48"
      ["post_content"]=>
      string(3807) "

Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel.

Don't turn your nose up just yet - if you love the combination of sweet & salty in your juicy BBQ Chicken, you'll love BBQ Eel.  Follow the recipe below! One of my favorite dishes at a sushi restaurant is Unagi, which is a fancy way of saying BBQ eel.  I was inspired to make my own after a colleague told me you can fish for eels in the rivers that feed into Lake Champlagne.  Someday I hope to catch my own, but the one used for this meal was a caught by my colleague. I was a squeamish child and young adult, squealing over spiders, bugs, and slimy things.  This squeamishness led to my vegetarian lifestyle, which I practiced for the better part of 10 years, because I struggled in associating my food with the animals the food came from.  You can read more about my food history here if it interests you.  Currently, I would describe my food lifestyle as holistic, non-wasting, DIY, and authentically/locally sourced. The 17 year-old girl in me would have a small heart attack to know she would grow into the woman I am today: butchering and grilling whole, slimy eels.  Eel is rich with omega-3 fatty acids, as well as other good for you vitamins and minerals.  If starting from scratch does not appeal to you, you can find prepared unagi in the frozen meat section of most Asian grocery stores. Find the comprehensive recipe list and serving suggestions here.

BBQ Eel

Ingredients: 1 lb Freshwater Eel 1 cup Unagi Sauce Method: Here is where I admit I am no butchering expert.  I watched some YouTube videos of prepping eel, but the people in the videos are VERY adept with a knife.  So...I took about 30 minutes to do a sloppier job of what the guys in the video did in about 60 seconds.  To prep, gut it, get the bones out, cut in half lengthwise, then cut into 4" steaks.  Leave the skin on - it will help while grilling. Start your grill and turn heat to medium.  While the grill is heating, skewer the steaks. Grill the Eel, skin side down, for three minutes.  Flip and grill another three minutes.  Turn the eel, baste with unagi sauce, and grill one minute skin side.  Flip again, baste with more unagi sauce, and grill one more minute. Until Next Time, Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(40) "dEELicious Flavors for your Summer Grill" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(246) "Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel. Fresh-caught from the rivers that feed into Lake Champlain, eel can be a delicious and unique addition to your summertime grill menu." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(40) "deelicious-flavors-for-your-summer-grill" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 07:26:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 11:26:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5177" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "2" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#367 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5133) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-05-19 10:09:13" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-19 14:09:13" ["post_content"]=> string(3488) " Like many people who live locally, I went to opening day of Burlington's Farmer's Market.  Also like many people, my intentions for being there were to score some local produce, people watch, and admire local handiwork.  My intentions were NOT to get a free banana, obviously not local, and a lesson on the banana trade. Upon entering the market, I was greeted by a genial man dressed as a banana.  He handed me a free banana, then delved into a passionate and shocking speech about the banana trade.  If you believe, as I do, in the power of voting with your dollar as a conscientious consumer, whether motivated by humanitarian or environmental causes, I guarantee you will change your banana shopping habits after learning what I have learned.

Shocker #1: INFERTILITY

DBCP, a pesticide introduced in the 1950's, was discovered to cause infertility in males.  Despite this knowledge, DBCP is still widely used for banana crops in developing countries, where the local residents are NOT educated on the danger of its use.

Shocker #1: MONOCULTURE

I don't know how I didn't know this, but bananas are a monoculture in many regions in Central America.  Monocultures lead to plant pathogens, diseases, and unhealthy soils, which leads to the use of dangerous agrocides, industrial fertilizers, and even extinction.

Shocker #2: TERRORISM

It's a long story, which you can learn for yourself in the documentary, Bananaland, but the cliff notes version is: the fruit company, Chiquita, knowingly funds registered terrorist groups in direct relationship to growing banana crops.

What we can do about it:

  • Buy organic
  • Buy fair trade
  • Tell your friends
What should you do with your fair trade, organic bananas? Make these tasty Gluten Free Banana Oatmeal Pancakes! *Side note: Burlington Farmer's Market has temporarily moved to 345 Pine Street Resources: Peace and Justice Center, Food Empowerment Project, Center for Science in the Public Interest Until next time, Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(40) "Go Bananas at Burlington Farmer's Market" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(183) "Vote with your dollar! Buy organic and buy fair trade! Make conscientious food choices after learning the shocking history of bananas. Gluten free banana pancake recipe included. " ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(39) "go-bananas-at-burlington-farmers-market" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-05-19 10:31:17" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-19 14:31:17" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5133" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "3" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#279 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5116) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-05-05 08:37:37" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-05 12:37:37" ["post_content"]=> string(3568) " Picture yourself learning the art of cheese making with renowned cheese maker, David Asher, or foraging for mushrooms in the beautiful rolling hills of the Northeast Kingdom, or learning the art of fermentation by the self-proclaimed "fermentation fetishist," Sandor Katz.  The School of the New American Farmstead (SNAF) at Sterling College offers you these experiences and more; visit their website for a full list of courses, and their press release for more information on the program. Be a lifelong learner!  Here's five great reasons why:

Community building

Trying new things and learning new skills as an adult scrounges up some vulnerability you probably don't experience in the rest of life.  In the midst of an online world, where social connections are often limited to virtual interactions, create real, human connections by engaging with other people in a curious and like-minded environment.

Knowledge can never be taken away from you

I was told this sentiment by a colleague, and it's true!  Your knowledge belongs to you; no one and nothing can take it from you. Pretty much everything else about you can be taken, tarnished, or damaged.  But your knowledge is yours to keep.

Ignorance may be bliss, but KNOWLEDGE is POWER

I don't disagree that ignorance may be bliss, but you would have to not know too many things to make that true.  Who wants to live their life with the knowledge and understanding of a toddler?  Armor yourself with knowledge, such that you will be prepared to have positive impact on the world around you.

Do your morning business in a tree-outhouse

If you go to SNAF, that is.  Sterling College offers rustic accommodations for a marginal fee.  Space is limited, so if this interests you, let them know!  Regardless, you get to enjoy the wild and untamed scenic experience of the Northeast Kingdom.

Resist entropy

There is no magic pill that will keep your skin and body youthful, but exercising your mental acuity will battle the deleterious effects of aging.  It will also build your self-confidence through the sense of accomplishment, and confidence is a survival skill. See you in class! -Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(43) "Five Reasons to Pursue Continuing Education" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(43) "five-reasons-to-pursue-continuing-education" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-05-05 08:40:37" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-05 12:40:37" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5116" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "3" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#368 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5177) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 07:26:48" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 11:26:48" ["post_content"]=> string(3807) "

Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel.

Don't turn your nose up just yet - if you love the combination of sweet & salty in your juicy BBQ Chicken, you'll love BBQ Eel.  Follow the recipe below! One of my favorite dishes at a sushi restaurant is Unagi, which is a fancy way of saying BBQ eel.  I was inspired to make my own after a colleague told me you can fish for eels in the rivers that feed into Lake Champlagne.  Someday I hope to catch my own, but the one used for this meal was a caught by my colleague. I was a squeamish child and young adult, squealing over spiders, bugs, and slimy things.  This squeamishness led to my vegetarian lifestyle, which I practiced for the better part of 10 years, because I struggled in associating my food with the animals the food came from.  You can read more about my food history here if it interests you.  Currently, I would describe my food lifestyle as holistic, non-wasting, DIY, and authentically/locally sourced. The 17 year-old girl in me would have a small heart attack to know she would grow into the woman I am today: butchering and grilling whole, slimy eels.  Eel is rich with omega-3 fatty acids, as well as other good for you vitamins and minerals.  If starting from scratch does not appeal to you, you can find prepared unagi in the frozen meat section of most Asian grocery stores. Find the comprehensive recipe list and serving suggestions here.

BBQ Eel

Ingredients: 1 lb Freshwater Eel 1 cup Unagi Sauce Method: Here is where I admit I am no butchering expert.  I watched some YouTube videos of prepping eel, but the people in the videos are VERY adept with a knife.  So...I took about 30 minutes to do a sloppier job of what the guys in the video did in about 60 seconds.  To prep, gut it, get the bones out, cut in half lengthwise, then cut into 4" steaks.  Leave the skin on - it will help while grilling. Start your grill and turn heat to medium.  While the grill is heating, skewer the steaks. Grill the Eel, skin side down, for three minutes.  Flip and grill another three minutes.  Turn the eel, baste with unagi sauce, and grill one minute skin side.  Flip again, baste with more unagi sauce, and grill one more minute. Until Next Time, Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(40) "dEELicious Flavors for your Summer Grill" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(246) "Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel. Fresh-caught from the rivers that feed into Lake Champlain, eel can be a delicious and unique addition to your summertime grill menu." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(40) "deelicious-flavors-for-your-summer-grill" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 07:26:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 11:26:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5177" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "2" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["queried_object"]=> object(WP_Term)#370 (16) { ["term_id"]=> int(1) ["name"]=> string(4) "blog" ["slug"]=> string(4) "blog" ["term_group"]=> int(0) ["term_taxonomy_id"]=> int(1) ["taxonomy"]=> string(8) "category" ["description"]=> string(0) "" ["parent"]=> int(0) ["count"]=> int(164) ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["cat_ID"]=> int(1) ["category_count"]=> int(164) ["category_description"]=> string(0) "" ["cat_name"]=> string(4) "blog" ["category_nicename"]=> string(4) "blog" ["category_parent"]=> int(0) } ["queried_object_id"]=> int(1) ["comments"]=> array(4) { [0]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1058 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208729" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5184" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Bronwyn Dunne" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "bronwyndunne@mac.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(34) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "64.222.107.3" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-07-15 11:12:31" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-15 15:12:31" ["comment_content"]=> string(422) "This is a great primer on how to cook Indian cuisine and I remember when -many years ago- I invited a neighbor to join me in my newish kitchen so she and I could make an Indian curry together. It was my Indian friend who taught me that curry is not just a single powder that comes out of jar but an assortment of spices....toasting them in a hot pan filled my kitchen with the essence of her native country...such a treat!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children:protected"]=> array(1) { [208730]=> object(WP_Comment)#1037 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208730" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5184" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Corrie Austin" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(21) "micalou1735@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "64.223.67.34" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-07-15 13:12:40" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-15 17:12:40" ["comment_content"]=> string(266) "Hello Bronwyn! I only recently, a little over a year ago, learned the same about curry not being a single spice. It also helps explain why there is such variance in the flavor. How fun we both have such pivotal experiences in our new kitchens! Take care, Corrie" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(6) "208729" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [1]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1037 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208730" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5184" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Corrie Austin" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(21) "micalou1735@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "64.223.67.34" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-07-15 13:12:40" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-15 17:12:40" ["comment_content"]=> string(266) "Hello Bronwyn! I only recently, a little over a year ago, learned the same about curry not being a single spice. It also helps explain why there is such variance in the flavor. How fun we both have such pivotal experiences in our new kitchens! Take care, Corrie" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(6) "208729" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [2]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1025 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208731" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5184" ["comment_author"]=> string(15) "Maria Brandriff" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "mbrandriff@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.198.90.127" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-07-20 16:43:37" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-20 20:43:37" ["comment_content"]=> string(167) "When I was in India, I learned that garam masala means "merchant's spice mix", so in essence every merchant has his own blend, hence another reason for the variations." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [3]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1036 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208735" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5184" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Kellie Kutkey" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(17) "kkutkey@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "98.246.70.94" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-09-16 19:46:51" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-09-16 23:46:51" ["comment_content"]=> string(137) "Ok, if I let the cumin seeds roast in my skillet with oil, then I can use the seeds just like the powder? That sounds amazing! Thanks :)" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } } ["comments_by_type"]=> array(4) { ["comment"]=> array(4) { [0]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1058 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208729" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5184" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Bronwyn Dunne" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "bronwyndunne@mac.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(34) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "64.222.107.3" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-07-15 11:12:31" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-15 15:12:31" ["comment_content"]=> string(422) "This is a great primer on how to cook Indian cuisine and I remember when -many years ago- I invited a neighbor to join me in my newish kitchen so she and I could make an Indian curry together. It was my Indian friend who taught me that curry is not just a single powder that comes out of jar but an assortment of spices....toasting them in a hot pan filled my kitchen with the essence of her native country...such a treat!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children:protected"]=> array(1) { [208730]=> object(WP_Comment)#1037 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208730" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5184" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Corrie Austin" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(21) "micalou1735@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "64.223.67.34" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-07-15 13:12:40" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-15 17:12:40" ["comment_content"]=> string(266) "Hello Bronwyn! I only recently, a little over a year ago, learned the same about curry not being a single spice. It also helps explain why there is such variance in the flavor. How fun we both have such pivotal experiences in our new kitchens! Take care, Corrie" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(6) "208729" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [1]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1037 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208730" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5184" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Corrie Austin" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(21) "micalou1735@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "64.223.67.34" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-07-15 13:12:40" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-15 17:12:40" ["comment_content"]=> string(266) "Hello Bronwyn! I only recently, a little over a year ago, learned the same about curry not being a single spice. It also helps explain why there is such variance in the flavor. How fun we both have such pivotal experiences in our new kitchens! Take care, Corrie" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(6) "208729" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [2]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1025 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208731" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5184" ["comment_author"]=> string(15) "Maria Brandriff" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "mbrandriff@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.198.90.127" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-07-20 16:43:37" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-07-20 20:43:37" ["comment_content"]=> string(167) "When I was in India, I learned that garam masala means "merchant's spice mix", so in essence every merchant has his own blend, hence another reason for the variations." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [3]=> &object(WP_Comment)#1036 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208735" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5184" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Kellie Kutkey" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(17) "kkutkey@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "98.246.70.94" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-09-16 19:46:51" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-09-16 23:46:51" ["comment_content"]=> string(137) "Ok, if I let the cumin seeds roast in my skillet with oil, then I can use the seeds just like the powder? That sounds amazing! Thanks :)" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } } ["trackback"]=> array(0) { } ["pingback"]=> array(0) { } ["pings"]=> array(0) { } } }
SUBSCRIBE TO THIS BLOG’S FEED

2 responses to “dEELicious Flavors for your Summer Grill”

  1. The photo of you and the eel is my favorite of all the blog photos! Where in the Burlington area -if you’re not a fisherman- can you find eel? Definitely want to try….looked delicious on the grill!!

    • Corrie Austin says:

      That is a very good question! They may have eels at either the Central Asian Market on Winooski Ave or at Thai Phat Oriental Food Market on North Street.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


 

Go Bananas at Burlington Farmer’s Market

Like many people who live locally, I went to opening day of Burlington’s Farmer’s Market.  Also like many people, my intentions for being there were to score some local produce, people watch, and admire local handiwork.  My intentions were NOT to get a free banana, obviously not local, and a lesson on the banana trade.

Upon entering the market, I was greeted by a genial man dressed as a banana.  He handed me a free banana, then delved into a passionate and shocking speech about the banana trade.  If you believe, as I do, in the power of voting with your dollar as a conscientious consumer, whether motivated by humanitarian or environmental causes, I guarantee you will change your banana shopping habits after learning what I have learned.

Shocker #1: INFERTILITY

DBCP, a pesticide introduced in the 1950’s, was discovered to cause infertility in males.  Despite this knowledge, DBCP is still widely used for banana crops in developing countries, where the local residents are NOT educated on the danger of its use.

Shocker #1: MONOCULTURE

I don’t know how I didn’t know this, but bananas are a monoculture in many regions in Central America.  Monocultures lead to plant pathogens, diseases, and unhealthy soils, which leads to the use of dangerous agrocides, industrial fertilizers, and even extinction.

Shocker #2: TERRORISM

It’s a long story, which you can learn for yourself in the documentary, Bananaland, but the cliff notes version is: the fruit company, Chiquita, knowingly funds registered terrorist groups in direct relationship to growing banana crops.

What we can do about it:

  • Buy organic
  • Buy fair trade
  • Tell your friends

What should you do with your fair trade, organic bananas? Make these tasty Gluten Free Banana Oatmeal Pancakes!

*Side note: Burlington Farmer’s Market has temporarily moved to 345 Pine Street

Resources: Peace and Justice Center, Food Empowerment Project, Center for Science in the Public Interest

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

Posted: 5-19-2019

object(WP_Query)#941 (53) {
  ["query_vars"]=>
  array(63) {
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["error"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["m"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["p"]=>
    int(0)
    ["post_parent"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["name"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["pagename"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["page_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["second"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["minute"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["hour"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["day"]=>
    int(0)
    ["monthnum"]=>
    int(0)
    ["year"]=>
    int(0)
    ["w"]=>
    int(0)
    ["tag"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["cat"]=>
    int(1)
    ["tag_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author_name"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["feed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["tb"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["paged"]=>
    int(0)
    ["meta_key"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["meta_value"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["preview"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["s"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["sentence"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["title"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["fields"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["menu_order"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["embed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["category__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_name__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["ignore_sticky_posts"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["suppress_filters"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["cache_results"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_term_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["lazy_load_term_meta"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_meta_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["post_type"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["posts_per_page"]=>
    int(5)
    ["nopaging"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["comments_per_page"]=>
    string(2) "50"
    ["no_found_rows"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["order"]=>
    string(4) "DESC"
  }
  ["tax_query"]=>
  object(WP_Tax_Query)#373 (6) {
    ["queries"]=>
    array(1) {
      [0]=>
      array(5) {
        ["taxonomy"]=>
        string(8) "category"
        ["terms"]=>
        array(1) {
          [0]=>
          string(4) "blog"
        }
        ["field"]=>
        string(4) "slug"
        ["operator"]=>
        string(2) "IN"
        ["include_children"]=>
        bool(true)
      }
    }
    ["relation"]=>
    string(3) "AND"
    ["table_aliases:protected"]=>
    array(1) {
      [0]=>
      string(21) "wp_term_relationships"
    }
    ["queried_terms"]=>
    array(1) {
      ["category"]=>
      array(2) {
        ["terms"]=>
        array(1) {
          [0]=>
          string(4) "blog"
        }
        ["field"]=>
        string(4) "slug"
      }
    }
    ["primary_table"]=>
    string(8) "wp_posts"
    ["primary_id_column"]=>
    string(2) "ID"
  }
  ["meta_query"]=>
  object(WP_Meta_Query)#374 (9) {
    ["queries"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["relation"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["table_aliases:protected"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["clauses:protected"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["has_or_relation:protected"]=>
    bool(false)
  }
  ["date_query"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["post_count"]=>
  int(5)
  ["current_post"]=>
  int(3)
  ["in_the_loop"]=>
  bool(true)
  ["comment_count"]=>
  int(2)
  ["current_comment"]=>
  int(-1)
  ["found_posts"]=>
  string(3) "121"
  ["max_num_pages"]=>
  float(25)
  ["max_num_comment_pages"]=>
  int(0)
  ["is_single"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_preview"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_page"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_archive"]=>
  bool(true)
  ["is_date"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_year"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_month"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_day"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_time"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_author"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_category"]=>
  bool(true)
  ["is_tag"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_tax"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_search"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_feed"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_comment_feed"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_trackback"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_home"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_404"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_embed"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_paged"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_admin"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_attachment"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_singular"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_robots"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_posts_page"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_post_type_archive"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["query_vars_hash:private"]=>
  string(32) "b239cec030b7b08e2301315b28070261"
  ["query_vars_changed:private"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["thumbnails_cached"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["stopwords:private"]=>
  NULL
  ["compat_fields:private"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(15) "query_vars_hash"
    [1]=>
    string(18) "query_vars_changed"
  }
  ["compat_methods:private"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(16) "init_query_flags"
    [1]=>
    string(15) "parse_tax_query"
  }
  ["query"]=>
  array(1) {
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
  }
  ["request"]=>
  string(341) "SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS  wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts  LEFT JOIN wp_term_relationships ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_term_relationships.object_id) WHERE 1=1  AND ( 
  wp_term_relationships.term_taxonomy_id IN (1)
) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post' AND (wp_posts.post_status = 'publish') GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 5"
  ["posts"]=>
  &array(5) {
    [0]=>
    object(WP_Post)#372 (24) {
      ["ID"]=>
      int(5217)
      ["post_author"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_date"]=>
      string(19) "2019-10-27 08:56:19"
      ["post_date_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-10-27 12:56:19"
      ["post_content"]=>
      string(5936) "

October brings a tapestry of fall colors across our Vermont landscapes with yellows, orange and red blazes.  And on almost every door stoop or walkway, pumpkins sit proudly clamoring to be noticed.  I’m always struck by the fact that it seems way too early to put pumpkins out as Halloween is thirty-one days away.  Won’t they be rotten by then?  As I watch more and more pumpkins all shapes and sizes grace front steps, walkways, and roadside stands, I’m determined not to give in this early - why rush things?

A week ago, I caved, and bought our family pumpkin which now sits proudly on our front stoop. This year I went for a Cinderella pumpkin, which was one of the most popular and common pumpkins grown in France in the 1800’s.  It’s short and ornamental and bears little resemblance to your traditional taller and smoother Jack- o -Lantern pumpkin.  Cinderella pumpkins are known more for their beauty and the flesh is somewhat sweet and its flavor very subtle.



After further research, I discovered that there are British pumpkins, Chinese, Indian and even Australian pumpkins- all somewhat different and something I had never given much thought.

Every country appears to have their version of pumpkins.

My favorite part of a pumpkin is hands down the seeds that you roast in the oven for about thirty to forty-five minutes until they are dry and then tossed with salt. I usually enjoy them this simple and easy way.  For a sweeter taste, you can toss the seeds with cinnamon and sugar. For a spicier flavor, toss with smoked paprika or a garam masala mix. Extracting the seeds from the slimy flesh and lining them in a single layer on a lightly oiled baking sheet can be messy but worth the work.



Pumpkins are one of the most nutritional foods, loaded with anti-oxidants disease-fighting vitamins, they are considered a Superfood that provide a good source of Vitamin A and C.

With an abundance of orange pumpkins available I was determined to create a few dishes. Never a big fan of pumpkin pie, I sought other options. On a recent October weekend, I returned to the quaint cottage, Bryn Teg, with Bronwyn with two recipes in hand- one for Curried Pumpkin Soup and the other, Best Ever Pumpkin Muffins.   In the charming kitchen with a view of an expansive landscape ablaze in color, I made the soup.  And I was reminded of an important lesson - not all recipes you find on the internet are always accurate.  As I questioned the four cups of water listed in the ingredients, I reluctantly decided to only add two cups and even then, the soup lacked flavor.



With Bronwyn at my side, we managed to salvage the recipe adding more spices and pumpkin to create the most delicious pumpkin soup, - a new version that is now ours to claim.   The muffins were gluten free as I substituted almond flour hoping it would not impact the outcome.  It worked.   They turned out lighter and delicious and for someone who does not typically like muffins – I loved these – a recipe from the Lovely Little Kitchen, modified slightly.

We roasted the seeds and ate them like candy.  When I returned home, I went immediately to the Common Roots Farmstand nearby and purchased several more pumpkins to make more roasted seeds.  I highly suggest that before you toss your pumpkins into the compost bin, extract the seeds and roast them!



Pumpkins continue to appear everywhere- loaded up on carts at markets, gracing the entrance to farm stands, on roadsides with handmade signs and on our stoops.  Recently at the market, I stood behind a lady who had one Jack-o Lantern on the grocery belt with 3 packages of stencils and tools to carve pumpkins.   I reminisced the days we carved spooky and goofy faces with our young children. Carving pumpkins is fun for all ages and I need to get a Jack- O Lantern before Halloween.

As we move closer to November, our brightly colored mums begin to fade, and our pumpkins become softer, I hope you will create something in your kitchen.   A hearty soup, muffins, a pumpkin cheesecake or roasted seeds are a few suggestions.  And beware that if a recipe doesn’t seem right- trust your instincts.   My attitude towards pumpkins has shifted – they are not just for décor and carving spooky faces but offer us a healthy colorful food to enjoy in a multitude of ways.

Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight, turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends!

-Laurie Caswell Burke"
      ["post_title"]=>
      string(32) "Pumpkins of all shapes and sizes"
      ["post_excerpt"]=>
      string(258) "Pumpkins are part of autumn tapestry, brightly colored and proudly clamoring to be noticed on stoops, walkways, and farmstand displays.   Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends!  "
      ["post_status"]=>
      string(7) "publish"
      ["comment_status"]=>
      string(4) "open"
      ["ping_status"]=>
      string(4) "open"
      ["post_password"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_name"]=>
      string(32) "pumpkins-of-all-shapes-and-sizes"
      ["to_ping"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["pinged"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_modified"]=>
      string(19) "2019-10-31 17:04:48"
      ["post_modified_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-10-31 21:04:48"
      ["post_content_filtered"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_parent"]=>
      int(0)
      ["guid"]=>
      string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5217"
      ["menu_order"]=>
      int(0)
      ["post_type"]=>
      string(4) "post"
      ["post_mime_type"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["comment_count"]=>
      string(1) "6"
      ["filter"]=>
      string(3) "raw"
    }
    [1]=>
    object(WP_Post)#371 (24) {
      ["ID"]=>
      int(5184)
      ["post_author"]=>
      string(1) "8"
      ["post_date"]=>
      string(19) "2019-07-14 08:29:30"
      ["post_date_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-07-14 12:29:30"
      ["post_content"]=>
      string(4611) "

When I asked a friend from India if she would give me some recipes, she generously made me mountains of delicious homemade Indian food.  But you know the adage, give a man fish vs teaching him to fish - I wanted to know how to make it myself!

I asked her to join me in my new kitchen (yes, NEW! We just bought our first home!)  While teaching me to cook, she told me about her childhood in India, how strictly she and her friends do or don't follow tradition, and her family and friends.  I love hearing people's stories.  The world becomes both smaller and larger at the same time, and these are things you can't learn by just reading a recipe.

And now, I have three new must-haves for my kitchen repertoire!



#1. Cumin Seeds

I regularly keep ground cumin on hand, but cumin seeds take it to a whole new level.  They are best used by heating oil in a pan, then stir in cumin seeds until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  It's that easy! Continue making your meal/following your recipe as planned.  Don't worry - there are no hard to chew seeds or husks in the end result.

Don't know where to start? Try the basic curry recipe below!

#2. Garam Masala

Garam masala is a blend of many spices that are toasted prior to being ground together.  The name means "warming spices," not by adding spicy heat, but because in Ayurvedic medicine, these spices "warm" the body, meaning they are said to increase the metabolism.

Typical spices included, though there are multiple variations, and this list is not comprehensive: coriander, cumin, cardamom pods, cloves, peppercorn, star anise, turmeric, and fennel.

#3. Ginger-Garlic Paste

Easy and delicious, this aromatic blend is perfect for cooking meat.

To make - add equal parts fresh ginger and garlic, plus a sprinkle of turmeric, purée in a blender or food processor.  Store in an air tight container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.



Chicken or Chickpea Curry

Ingredients:

1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil

1 Onion

1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds

2 Tomatoes

1 1/2 lb Chicken or 1-2 cans garbanzo beans

Garlic and Ginger Purée (see method above)

Spices to taste: garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, and either red chili or cayenne if you like some heat

Method:

Heat olive oil in a large pan over medium heat.  While pan is heating, dice an onion.  Add cumin seeds to pan, and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Add onion and sprinkle with salt.  Stir occasionally until onion is cooked through (about 12 minutes).  While onion is cooking, dice two tomatoes and cut chicken into cubes.  Add tomato and stir gently for 30 seconds.  Add chicken or chickpeas and a generous spoonful of garlic and ginger puree.  Cook uncovered until "raw" smell is gone.  Cover and cook until almost done, stirring occasionally.  Uncover and stir in garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, cayenne, and salt to taste.  Cook until done.  Right before removing from heat, add small handful of chopped cilantro and stir until wilted.

Jeera Rice (Coriander Rice)

Ingredients:

1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil

1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds

Handful Fresh Cilantro

Salt to taste

1 cup rice

2 cup water or broth

Method:

Heat olive oil in a small pan.  Add cumin seeds and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Meanwhile, chop a small bunch of cilantro.  Add to cumin and oil and stir until wilted and coated with olive oil (about 15 seconds).  Add cumin and cilantro mix, plus salt to taste, to whatever vessel you plan to cook your rice with.  Prepare rice the same as you normally would (we use our pressure cooker)."
      ["post_title"]=>
      string(43) "Three New Must-Haves For Your Spice Cabinet"
      ["post_excerpt"]=>
      string(186) "Add spice to your life by including these three new flavors to your list of kitchen essentials.  Inspired by Indian cooking, these ingredients are versatile and tasty - recipes included!"
      ["post_status"]=>
      string(7) "publish"
      ["comment_status"]=>
      string(4) "open"
      ["ping_status"]=>
      string(4) "open"
      ["post_password"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_name"]=>
      string(43) "three-new-must-haves-for-your-spice-cabinet"
      ["to_ping"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["pinged"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_modified"]=>
      string(19) "2019-07-14 08:30:01"
      ["post_modified_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-07-14 12:30:01"
      ["post_content_filtered"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_parent"]=>
      int(0)
      ["guid"]=>
      string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5184"
      ["menu_order"]=>
      int(0)
      ["post_type"]=>
      string(4) "post"
      ["post_mime_type"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["comment_count"]=>
      string(1) "4"
      ["filter"]=>
      string(3) "raw"
    }
    [2]=>
    object(WP_Post)#368 (24) {
      ["ID"]=>
      int(5177)
      ["post_author"]=>
      string(1) "8"
      ["post_date"]=>
      string(19) "2019-06-14 07:26:48"
      ["post_date_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-06-14 11:26:48"
      ["post_content"]=>
      string(3807) "

Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel.

Don't turn your nose up just yet - if you love the combination of sweet & salty in your juicy BBQ Chicken, you'll love BBQ Eel.  Follow the recipe below! One of my favorite dishes at a sushi restaurant is Unagi, which is a fancy way of saying BBQ eel.  I was inspired to make my own after a colleague told me you can fish for eels in the rivers that feed into Lake Champlagne.  Someday I hope to catch my own, but the one used for this meal was a caught by my colleague. I was a squeamish child and young adult, squealing over spiders, bugs, and slimy things.  This squeamishness led to my vegetarian lifestyle, which I practiced for the better part of 10 years, because I struggled in associating my food with the animals the food came from.  You can read more about my food history here if it interests you.  Currently, I would describe my food lifestyle as holistic, non-wasting, DIY, and authentically/locally sourced. The 17 year-old girl in me would have a small heart attack to know she would grow into the woman I am today: butchering and grilling whole, slimy eels.  Eel is rich with omega-3 fatty acids, as well as other good for you vitamins and minerals.  If starting from scratch does not appeal to you, you can find prepared unagi in the frozen meat section of most Asian grocery stores. Find the comprehensive recipe list and serving suggestions here.

BBQ Eel

Ingredients: 1 lb Freshwater Eel 1 cup Unagi Sauce Method: Here is where I admit I am no butchering expert.  I watched some YouTube videos of prepping eel, but the people in the videos are VERY adept with a knife.  So...I took about 30 minutes to do a sloppier job of what the guys in the video did in about 60 seconds.  To prep, gut it, get the bones out, cut in half lengthwise, then cut into 4" steaks.  Leave the skin on - it will help while grilling. Start your grill and turn heat to medium.  While the grill is heating, skewer the steaks. Grill the Eel, skin side down, for three minutes.  Flip and grill another three minutes.  Turn the eel, baste with unagi sauce, and grill one minute skin side.  Flip again, baste with more unagi sauce, and grill one more minute. Until Next Time, Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(40) "dEELicious Flavors for your Summer Grill" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(246) "Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel. Fresh-caught from the rivers that feed into Lake Champlain, eel can be a delicious and unique addition to your summertime grill menu." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(40) "deelicious-flavors-for-your-summer-grill" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 07:26:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 11:26:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5177" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "2" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#367 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5133) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-05-19 10:09:13" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-19 14:09:13" ["post_content"]=> string(3488) " Like many people who live locally, I went to opening day of Burlington's Farmer's Market.  Also like many people, my intentions for being there were to score some local produce, people watch, and admire local handiwork.  My intentions were NOT to get a free banana, obviously not local, and a lesson on the banana trade. Upon entering the market, I was greeted by a genial man dressed as a banana.  He handed me a free banana, then delved into a passionate and shocking speech about the banana trade.  If you believe, as I do, in the power of voting with your dollar as a conscientious consumer, whether motivated by humanitarian or environmental causes, I guarantee you will change your banana shopping habits after learning what I have learned.

Shocker #1: INFERTILITY

DBCP, a pesticide introduced in the 1950's, was discovered to cause infertility in males.  Despite this knowledge, DBCP is still widely used for banana crops in developing countries, where the local residents are NOT educated on the danger of its use.

Shocker #1: MONOCULTURE

I don't know how I didn't know this, but bananas are a monoculture in many regions in Central America.  Monocultures lead to plant pathogens, diseases, and unhealthy soils, which leads to the use of dangerous agrocides, industrial fertilizers, and even extinction.

Shocker #2: TERRORISM

It's a long story, which you can learn for yourself in the documentary, Bananaland, but the cliff notes version is: the fruit company, Chiquita, knowingly funds registered terrorist groups in direct relationship to growing banana crops.

What we can do about it:

  • Buy organic
  • Buy fair trade
  • Tell your friends
What should you do with your fair trade, organic bananas? Make these tasty Gluten Free Banana Oatmeal Pancakes! *Side note: Burlington Farmer's Market has temporarily moved to 345 Pine Street Resources: Peace and Justice Center, Food Empowerment Project, Center for Science in the Public Interest Until next time, Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(40) "Go Bananas at Burlington Farmer's Market" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(183) "Vote with your dollar! Buy organic and buy fair trade! Make conscientious food choices after learning the shocking history of bananas. Gluten free banana pancake recipe included. " ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(39) "go-bananas-at-burlington-farmers-market" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-05-19 10:31:17" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-19 14:31:17" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5133" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "3" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#279 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5116) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-05-05 08:37:37" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-05 12:37:37" ["post_content"]=> string(3568) " Picture yourself learning the art of cheese making with renowned cheese maker, David Asher, or foraging for mushrooms in the beautiful rolling hills of the Northeast Kingdom, or learning the art of fermentation by the self-proclaimed "fermentation fetishist," Sandor Katz.  The School of the New American Farmstead (SNAF) at Sterling College offers you these experiences and more; visit their website for a full list of courses, and their press release for more information on the program. Be a lifelong learner!  Here's five great reasons why:

Community building

Trying new things and learning new skills as an adult scrounges up some vulnerability you probably don't experience in the rest of life.  In the midst of an online world, where social connections are often limited to virtual interactions, create real, human connections by engaging with other people in a curious and like-minded environment.

Knowledge can never be taken away from you

I was told this sentiment by a colleague, and it's true!  Your knowledge belongs to you; no one and nothing can take it from you. Pretty much everything else about you can be taken, tarnished, or damaged.  But your knowledge is yours to keep.

Ignorance may be bliss, but KNOWLEDGE is POWER

I don't disagree that ignorance may be bliss, but you would have to not know too many things to make that true.  Who wants to live their life with the knowledge and understanding of a toddler?  Armor yourself with knowledge, such that you will be prepared to have positive impact on the world around you.

Do your morning business in a tree-outhouse

If you go to SNAF, that is.  Sterling College offers rustic accommodations for a marginal fee.  Space is limited, so if this interests you, let them know!  Regardless, you get to enjoy the wild and untamed scenic experience of the Northeast Kingdom.

Resist entropy

There is no magic pill that will keep your skin and body youthful, but exercising your mental acuity will battle the deleterious effects of aging.  It will also build your self-confidence through the sense of accomplishment, and confidence is a survival skill. See you in class! -Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(43) "Five Reasons to Pursue Continuing Education" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(43) "five-reasons-to-pursue-continuing-education" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-05-05 08:40:37" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-05 12:40:37" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5116" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "3" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#367 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5133) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-05-19 10:09:13" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-19 14:09:13" ["post_content"]=> string(3488) " Like many people who live locally, I went to opening day of Burlington's Farmer's Market.  Also like many people, my intentions for being there were to score some local produce, people watch, and admire local handiwork.  My intentions were NOT to get a free banana, obviously not local, and a lesson on the banana trade. Upon entering the market, I was greeted by a genial man dressed as a banana.  He handed me a free banana, then delved into a passionate and shocking speech about the banana trade.  If you believe, as I do, in the power of voting with your dollar as a conscientious consumer, whether motivated by humanitarian or environmental causes, I guarantee you will change your banana shopping habits after learning what I have learned.

Shocker #1: INFERTILITY

DBCP, a pesticide introduced in the 1950's, was discovered to cause infertility in males.  Despite this knowledge, DBCP is still widely used for banana crops in developing countries, where the local residents are NOT educated on the danger of its use.

Shocker #1: MONOCULTURE

I don't know how I didn't know this, but bananas are a monoculture in many regions in Central America.  Monocultures lead to plant pathogens, diseases, and unhealthy soils, which leads to the use of dangerous agrocides, industrial fertilizers, and even extinction.

Shocker #2: TERRORISM

It's a long story, which you can learn for yourself in the documentary, Bananaland, but the cliff notes version is: the fruit company, Chiquita, knowingly funds registered terrorist groups in direct relationship to growing banana crops.

What we can do about it:

  • Buy organic
  • Buy fair trade
  • Tell your friends
What should you do with your fair trade, organic bananas? Make these tasty Gluten Free Banana Oatmeal Pancakes! *Side note: Burlington Farmer's Market has temporarily moved to 345 Pine Street Resources: Peace and Justice Center, Food Empowerment Project, Center for Science in the Public Interest Until next time, Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(40) "Go Bananas at Burlington Farmer's Market" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(183) "Vote with your dollar! Buy organic and buy fair trade! Make conscientious food choices after learning the shocking history of bananas. Gluten free banana pancake recipe included. " ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(39) "go-bananas-at-burlington-farmers-market" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-05-19 10:31:17" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-19 14:31:17" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5133" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "3" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["queried_object"]=> object(WP_Term)#370 (16) { ["term_id"]=> int(1) ["name"]=> string(4) "blog" ["slug"]=> string(4) "blog" ["term_group"]=> int(0) ["term_taxonomy_id"]=> int(1) ["taxonomy"]=> string(8) "category" ["description"]=> string(0) "" ["parent"]=> int(0) ["count"]=> int(164) ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["cat_ID"]=> int(1) ["category_count"]=> int(164) ["category_description"]=> string(0) "" ["cat_name"]=> string(4) "blog" ["category_nicename"]=> string(4) "blog" ["category_parent"]=> int(0) } ["queried_object_id"]=> int(1) ["comments"]=> array(2) { [0]=> &object(WP_Comment)#251 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208727" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5177" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Bronwyn Dunne" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "bronwyndunne@mac.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(34) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.91.160.255" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-06-17 00:19:45" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-17 04:19:45" ["comment_content"]=> string(200) "The photo of you and the eel is my favorite of all the blog photos! Where in the Burlington area -if you're not a fisherman- can you find eel? Definitely want to try....looked delicious on the grill!!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children:protected"]=> array(1) { [208728]=> object(WP_Comment)#256 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208728" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5177" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Corrie Austin" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(21) "micalou1735@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "64.223.67.34" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-06-17 10:38:32" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-17 14:38:32" ["comment_content"]=> string(154) "That is a very good question! They may have eels at either the Central Asian Market on Winooski Ave or at Thai Phat Oriental Food Market on North Street." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(6) "208727" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [1]=> &object(WP_Comment)#256 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208728" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5177" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Corrie Austin" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(21) "micalou1735@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "64.223.67.34" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-06-17 10:38:32" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-17 14:38:32" ["comment_content"]=> string(154) "That is a very good question! They may have eels at either the Central Asian Market on Winooski Ave or at Thai Phat Oriental Food Market on North Street." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(6) "208727" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } } ["comments_by_type"]=> array(4) { ["comment"]=> array(2) { [0]=> &object(WP_Comment)#251 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208727" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5177" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Bronwyn Dunne" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "bronwyndunne@mac.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(34) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(13) "24.91.160.255" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-06-17 00:19:45" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-17 04:19:45" ["comment_content"]=> string(200) "The photo of you and the eel is my favorite of all the blog photos! Where in the Burlington area -if you're not a fisherman- can you find eel? Definitely want to try....looked delicious on the grill!!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children:protected"]=> array(1) { [208728]=> object(WP_Comment)#256 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208728" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5177" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Corrie Austin" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(21) "micalou1735@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "64.223.67.34" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-06-17 10:38:32" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-17 14:38:32" ["comment_content"]=> string(154) "That is a very good question! They may have eels at either the Central Asian Market on Winooski Ave or at Thai Phat Oriental Food Market on North Street." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(6) "208727" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [1]=> &object(WP_Comment)#256 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208728" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5177" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Corrie Austin" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(21) "micalou1735@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "64.223.67.34" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-06-17 10:38:32" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-17 14:38:32" ["comment_content"]=> string(154) "That is a very good question! They may have eels at either the Central Asian Market on Winooski Ave or at Thai Phat Oriental Food Market on North Street." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(6) "208727" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } } ["trackback"]=> array(0) { } ["pingback"]=> array(0) { } ["pings"]=> array(0) { } } }
SUBSCRIBE TO THIS BLOG’S FEED

3 responses to “Go Bananas at Burlington Farmer’s Market”

  1. It’s so funny that there is a danger to the pesticides used on bananas. I remember long ago my mother feeling that bananas were excellent fruit to give us children since she didn’t have to wash them and were so easy for long trips, etc. But, a year or so ago, I stopped eating bananas, a fruit I used often sliced on my granola…and, I felt better. Who knows but with food, I think there are no coincidences.

    • Corrie Austin says:

      There’s a reason we are friends! I agree with so many of the things you just said. I agree – food can either be our medicine or our disease. I have not stopped eating bananas, but I am careful to source them organic and fair trade. I also rely on the “dirty dozen” and “clean fifteen” lists for guidance while I grocery shop.

  2. Kellie Kutkey says:

    Hi Corrie,
    I remember hearing about how bananas used to come in all sorts of sizes and shapes, etc. but the one we got is the most economical to produce (it’s all about the dollar, grrr). Kinda like corn.
    I wonder if you can have a link to the dirty dozen and the clean fifteen on your blog? I reference them and then immediately forget . . . except for apples. It bums me out that they are on the dirty dozen list 🙁
    Thanks!!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


 

Five Reasons to Pursue Continuing Education

Picture yourself learning the art of cheese making with renowned cheese maker, David Asher, or foraging for mushrooms in the beautiful rolling hills of the Northeast Kingdom, or learning the art of fermentation by the self-proclaimed “fermentation fetishist,” Sandor Katz.  The School of the New American Farmstead (SNAF) at Sterling College offers you these experiences and more; visit their website for a full list of courses, and their press release for more information on the program.

Be a lifelong learner!  Here’s five great reasons why:

Community building

Trying new things and learning new skills as an adult scrounges up some vulnerability you probably don’t experience in the rest of life.  In the midst of an online world, where social connections are often limited to virtual interactions, create real, human connections by engaging with other people in a curious and like-minded environment.

Knowledge can never be taken away from you

I was told this sentiment by a colleague, and it’s true!  Your knowledge belongs to you; no one and nothing can take it from you. Pretty much everything else about you can be taken, tarnished, or damaged.  But your knowledge is yours to keep.

Ignorance may be bliss, but KNOWLEDGE is POWER

I don’t disagree that ignorance may be bliss, but you would have to not know too many things to make that true.  Who wants to live their life with the knowledge and understanding of a toddler?  Armor yourself with knowledge, such that you will be prepared to have positive impact on the world around you.

Do your morning business in a tree-outhouse

If you go to SNAF, that is.  Sterling College offers rustic accommodations for a marginal fee.  Space is limited, so if this interests you, let them know!  Regardless, you get to enjoy the wild and untamed scenic experience of the Northeast Kingdom.

Resist entropy

There is no magic pill that will keep your skin and body youthful, but exercising your mental acuity will battle the deleterious effects of aging.  It will also build your self-confidence through the sense of accomplishment, and confidence is a survival skill.

See you in class!

Corrie Austin

Posted: 5-5-2019

object(WP_Query)#941 (53) {
  ["query_vars"]=>
  array(63) {
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
    ["error"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["m"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["p"]=>
    int(0)
    ["post_parent"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["subpost_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["attachment_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["name"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["pagename"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["page_id"]=>
    int(0)
    ["second"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["minute"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["hour"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["day"]=>
    int(0)
    ["monthnum"]=>
    int(0)
    ["year"]=>
    int(0)
    ["w"]=>
    int(0)
    ["tag"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["cat"]=>
    int(1)
    ["tag_id"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["author_name"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["feed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["tb"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["paged"]=>
    int(0)
    ["meta_key"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["meta_value"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["preview"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["s"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["sentence"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["title"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["fields"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["menu_order"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["embed"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["category__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["category__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_name__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["tag_slug__and"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["post_parent__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["author__not_in"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["ignore_sticky_posts"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["suppress_filters"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["cache_results"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_term_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["lazy_load_term_meta"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["update_post_meta_cache"]=>
    bool(true)
    ["post_type"]=>
    string(0) ""
    ["posts_per_page"]=>
    int(5)
    ["nopaging"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["comments_per_page"]=>
    string(2) "50"
    ["no_found_rows"]=>
    bool(false)
    ["order"]=>
    string(4) "DESC"
  }
  ["tax_query"]=>
  object(WP_Tax_Query)#373 (6) {
    ["queries"]=>
    array(1) {
      [0]=>
      array(5) {
        ["taxonomy"]=>
        string(8) "category"
        ["terms"]=>
        array(1) {
          [0]=>
          string(4) "blog"
        }
        ["field"]=>
        string(4) "slug"
        ["operator"]=>
        string(2) "IN"
        ["include_children"]=>
        bool(true)
      }
    }
    ["relation"]=>
    string(3) "AND"
    ["table_aliases:protected"]=>
    array(1) {
      [0]=>
      string(21) "wp_term_relationships"
    }
    ["queried_terms"]=>
    array(1) {
      ["category"]=>
      array(2) {
        ["terms"]=>
        array(1) {
          [0]=>
          string(4) "blog"
        }
        ["field"]=>
        string(4) "slug"
      }
    }
    ["primary_table"]=>
    string(8) "wp_posts"
    ["primary_id_column"]=>
    string(2) "ID"
  }
  ["meta_query"]=>
  object(WP_Meta_Query)#374 (9) {
    ["queries"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["relation"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["meta_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_table"]=>
    NULL
    ["primary_id_column"]=>
    NULL
    ["table_aliases:protected"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["clauses:protected"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
    ["has_or_relation:protected"]=>
    bool(false)
  }
  ["date_query"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["post_count"]=>
  int(5)
  ["current_post"]=>
  int(4)
  ["in_the_loop"]=>
  bool(true)
  ["comment_count"]=>
  int(3)
  ["current_comment"]=>
  int(-1)
  ["found_posts"]=>
  string(3) "121"
  ["max_num_pages"]=>
  float(25)
  ["max_num_comment_pages"]=>
  int(0)
  ["is_single"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_preview"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_page"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_archive"]=>
  bool(true)
  ["is_date"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_year"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_month"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_day"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_time"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_author"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_category"]=>
  bool(true)
  ["is_tag"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_tax"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_search"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_feed"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_comment_feed"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_trackback"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_home"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_404"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_embed"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_paged"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_admin"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_attachment"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_singular"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_robots"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_posts_page"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["is_post_type_archive"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["query_vars_hash:private"]=>
  string(32) "b239cec030b7b08e2301315b28070261"
  ["query_vars_changed:private"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["thumbnails_cached"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["stopwords:private"]=>
  NULL
  ["compat_fields:private"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(15) "query_vars_hash"
    [1]=>
    string(18) "query_vars_changed"
  }
  ["compat_methods:private"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    string(16) "init_query_flags"
    [1]=>
    string(15) "parse_tax_query"
  }
  ["query"]=>
  array(1) {
    ["category_name"]=>
    string(4) "blog"
  }
  ["request"]=>
  string(341) "SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS  wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts  LEFT JOIN wp_term_relationships ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_term_relationships.object_id) WHERE 1=1  AND ( 
  wp_term_relationships.term_taxonomy_id IN (1)
) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post' AND (wp_posts.post_status = 'publish') GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 5"
  ["posts"]=>
  &array(5) {
    [0]=>
    object(WP_Post)#372 (24) {
      ["ID"]=>
      int(5217)
      ["post_author"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_date"]=>
      string(19) "2019-10-27 08:56:19"
      ["post_date_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-10-27 12:56:19"
      ["post_content"]=>
      string(5936) "

October brings a tapestry of fall colors across our Vermont landscapes with yellows, orange and red blazes.  And on almost every door stoop or walkway, pumpkins sit proudly clamoring to be noticed.  I’m always struck by the fact that it seems way too early to put pumpkins out as Halloween is thirty-one days away.  Won’t they be rotten by then?  As I watch more and more pumpkins all shapes and sizes grace front steps, walkways, and roadside stands, I’m determined not to give in this early - why rush things?

A week ago, I caved, and bought our family pumpkin which now sits proudly on our front stoop. This year I went for a Cinderella pumpkin, which was one of the most popular and common pumpkins grown in France in the 1800’s.  It’s short and ornamental and bears little resemblance to your traditional taller and smoother Jack- o -Lantern pumpkin.  Cinderella pumpkins are known more for their beauty and the flesh is somewhat sweet and its flavor very subtle.



After further research, I discovered that there are British pumpkins, Chinese, Indian and even Australian pumpkins- all somewhat different and something I had never given much thought.

Every country appears to have their version of pumpkins.

My favorite part of a pumpkin is hands down the seeds that you roast in the oven for about thirty to forty-five minutes until they are dry and then tossed with salt. I usually enjoy them this simple and easy way.  For a sweeter taste, you can toss the seeds with cinnamon and sugar. For a spicier flavor, toss with smoked paprika or a garam masala mix. Extracting the seeds from the slimy flesh and lining them in a single layer on a lightly oiled baking sheet can be messy but worth the work.



Pumpkins are one of the most nutritional foods, loaded with anti-oxidants disease-fighting vitamins, they are considered a Superfood that provide a good source of Vitamin A and C.

With an abundance of orange pumpkins available I was determined to create a few dishes. Never a big fan of pumpkin pie, I sought other options. On a recent October weekend, I returned to the quaint cottage, Bryn Teg, with Bronwyn with two recipes in hand- one for Curried Pumpkin Soup and the other, Best Ever Pumpkin Muffins.   In the charming kitchen with a view of an expansive landscape ablaze in color, I made the soup.  And I was reminded of an important lesson - not all recipes you find on the internet are always accurate.  As I questioned the four cups of water listed in the ingredients, I reluctantly decided to only add two cups and even then, the soup lacked flavor.



With Bronwyn at my side, we managed to salvage the recipe adding more spices and pumpkin to create the most delicious pumpkin soup, - a new version that is now ours to claim.   The muffins were gluten free as I substituted almond flour hoping it would not impact the outcome.  It worked.   They turned out lighter and delicious and for someone who does not typically like muffins – I loved these – a recipe from the Lovely Little Kitchen, modified slightly.

We roasted the seeds and ate them like candy.  When I returned home, I went immediately to the Common Roots Farmstand nearby and purchased several more pumpkins to make more roasted seeds.  I highly suggest that before you toss your pumpkins into the compost bin, extract the seeds and roast them!



Pumpkins continue to appear everywhere- loaded up on carts at markets, gracing the entrance to farm stands, on roadsides with handmade signs and on our stoops.  Recently at the market, I stood behind a lady who had one Jack-o Lantern on the grocery belt with 3 packages of stencils and tools to carve pumpkins.   I reminisced the days we carved spooky and goofy faces with our young children. Carving pumpkins is fun for all ages and I need to get a Jack- O Lantern before Halloween.

As we move closer to November, our brightly colored mums begin to fade, and our pumpkins become softer, I hope you will create something in your kitchen.   A hearty soup, muffins, a pumpkin cheesecake or roasted seeds are a few suggestions.  And beware that if a recipe doesn’t seem right- trust your instincts.   My attitude towards pumpkins has shifted – they are not just for décor and carving spooky faces but offer us a healthy colorful food to enjoy in a multitude of ways.

Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight, turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends!

-Laurie Caswell Burke"
      ["post_title"]=>
      string(32) "Pumpkins of all shapes and sizes"
      ["post_excerpt"]=>
      string(258) "Pumpkins are part of autumn tapestry, brightly colored and proudly clamoring to be noticed on stoops, walkways, and farmstand displays.   Instead of turning into a pumpkin at midnight turn your pumpkin into something delicious for your family and friends!  "
      ["post_status"]=>
      string(7) "publish"
      ["comment_status"]=>
      string(4) "open"
      ["ping_status"]=>
      string(4) "open"
      ["post_password"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_name"]=>
      string(32) "pumpkins-of-all-shapes-and-sizes"
      ["to_ping"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["pinged"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_modified"]=>
      string(19) "2019-10-31 17:04:48"
      ["post_modified_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-10-31 21:04:48"
      ["post_content_filtered"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_parent"]=>
      int(0)
      ["guid"]=>
      string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5217"
      ["menu_order"]=>
      int(0)
      ["post_type"]=>
      string(4) "post"
      ["post_mime_type"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["comment_count"]=>
      string(1) "6"
      ["filter"]=>
      string(3) "raw"
    }
    [1]=>
    object(WP_Post)#371 (24) {
      ["ID"]=>
      int(5184)
      ["post_author"]=>
      string(1) "8"
      ["post_date"]=>
      string(19) "2019-07-14 08:29:30"
      ["post_date_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-07-14 12:29:30"
      ["post_content"]=>
      string(4611) "

When I asked a friend from India if she would give me some recipes, she generously made me mountains of delicious homemade Indian food.  But you know the adage, give a man fish vs teaching him to fish - I wanted to know how to make it myself!

I asked her to join me in my new kitchen (yes, NEW! We just bought our first home!)  While teaching me to cook, she told me about her childhood in India, how strictly she and her friends do or don't follow tradition, and her family and friends.  I love hearing people's stories.  The world becomes both smaller and larger at the same time, and these are things you can't learn by just reading a recipe.

And now, I have three new must-haves for my kitchen repertoire!



#1. Cumin Seeds

I regularly keep ground cumin on hand, but cumin seeds take it to a whole new level.  They are best used by heating oil in a pan, then stir in cumin seeds until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  It's that easy! Continue making your meal/following your recipe as planned.  Don't worry - there are no hard to chew seeds or husks in the end result.

Don't know where to start? Try the basic curry recipe below!

#2. Garam Masala

Garam masala is a blend of many spices that are toasted prior to being ground together.  The name means "warming spices," not by adding spicy heat, but because in Ayurvedic medicine, these spices "warm" the body, meaning they are said to increase the metabolism.

Typical spices included, though there are multiple variations, and this list is not comprehensive: coriander, cumin, cardamom pods, cloves, peppercorn, star anise, turmeric, and fennel.

#3. Ginger-Garlic Paste

Easy and delicious, this aromatic blend is perfect for cooking meat.

To make - add equal parts fresh ginger and garlic, plus a sprinkle of turmeric, purée in a blender or food processor.  Store in an air tight container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.



Chicken or Chickpea Curry

Ingredients:

1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil

1 Onion

1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds

2 Tomatoes

1 1/2 lb Chicken or 1-2 cans garbanzo beans

Garlic and Ginger Purée (see method above)

Spices to taste: garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, and either red chili or cayenne if you like some heat

Method:

Heat olive oil in a large pan over medium heat.  While pan is heating, dice an onion.  Add cumin seeds to pan, and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Add onion and sprinkle with salt.  Stir occasionally until onion is cooked through (about 12 minutes).  While onion is cooking, dice two tomatoes and cut chicken into cubes.  Add tomato and stir gently for 30 seconds.  Add chicken or chickpeas and a generous spoonful of garlic and ginger puree.  Cook uncovered until "raw" smell is gone.  Cover and cook until almost done, stirring occasionally.  Uncover and stir in garam masala, paprika, coriander, turmeric, cayenne, and salt to taste.  Cook until done.  Right before removing from heat, add small handful of chopped cilantro and stir until wilted.

Jeera Rice (Coriander Rice)

Ingredients:

1-2 Tbsp Olive Oil

1 Tbsp Cumin Seeds

Handful Fresh Cilantro

Salt to taste

1 cup rice

2 cup water or broth

Method:

Heat olive oil in a small pan.  Add cumin seeds and stir until aromatic (1-2 minutes).  Meanwhile, chop a small bunch of cilantro.  Add to cumin and oil and stir until wilted and coated with olive oil (about 15 seconds).  Add cumin and cilantro mix, plus salt to taste, to whatever vessel you plan to cook your rice with.  Prepare rice the same as you normally would (we use our pressure cooker)."
      ["post_title"]=>
      string(43) "Three New Must-Haves For Your Spice Cabinet"
      ["post_excerpt"]=>
      string(186) "Add spice to your life by including these three new flavors to your list of kitchen essentials.  Inspired by Indian cooking, these ingredients are versatile and tasty - recipes included!"
      ["post_status"]=>
      string(7) "publish"
      ["comment_status"]=>
      string(4) "open"
      ["ping_status"]=>
      string(4) "open"
      ["post_password"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_name"]=>
      string(43) "three-new-must-haves-for-your-spice-cabinet"
      ["to_ping"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["pinged"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_modified"]=>
      string(19) "2019-07-14 08:30:01"
      ["post_modified_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-07-14 12:30:01"
      ["post_content_filtered"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["post_parent"]=>
      int(0)
      ["guid"]=>
      string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5184"
      ["menu_order"]=>
      int(0)
      ["post_type"]=>
      string(4) "post"
      ["post_mime_type"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["comment_count"]=>
      string(1) "4"
      ["filter"]=>
      string(3) "raw"
    }
    [2]=>
    object(WP_Post)#368 (24) {
      ["ID"]=>
      int(5177)
      ["post_author"]=>
      string(1) "8"
      ["post_date"]=>
      string(19) "2019-06-14 07:26:48"
      ["post_date_gmt"]=>
      string(19) "2019-06-14 11:26:48"
      ["post_content"]=>
      string(3807) "

Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel.

Don't turn your nose up just yet - if you love the combination of sweet & salty in your juicy BBQ Chicken, you'll love BBQ Eel.  Follow the recipe below! One of my favorite dishes at a sushi restaurant is Unagi, which is a fancy way of saying BBQ eel.  I was inspired to make my own after a colleague told me you can fish for eels in the rivers that feed into Lake Champlagne.  Someday I hope to catch my own, but the one used for this meal was a caught by my colleague. I was a squeamish child and young adult, squealing over spiders, bugs, and slimy things.  This squeamishness led to my vegetarian lifestyle, which I practiced for the better part of 10 years, because I struggled in associating my food with the animals the food came from.  You can read more about my food history here if it interests you.  Currently, I would describe my food lifestyle as holistic, non-wasting, DIY, and authentically/locally sourced. The 17 year-old girl in me would have a small heart attack to know she would grow into the woman I am today: butchering and grilling whole, slimy eels.  Eel is rich with omega-3 fatty acids, as well as other good for you vitamins and minerals.  If starting from scratch does not appeal to you, you can find prepared unagi in the frozen meat section of most Asian grocery stores. Find the comprehensive recipe list and serving suggestions here.

BBQ Eel

Ingredients: 1 lb Freshwater Eel 1 cup Unagi Sauce Method: Here is where I admit I am no butchering expert.  I watched some YouTube videos of prepping eel, but the people in the videos are VERY adept with a knife.  So...I took about 30 minutes to do a sloppier job of what the guys in the video did in about 60 seconds.  To prep, gut it, get the bones out, cut in half lengthwise, then cut into 4" steaks.  Leave the skin on - it will help while grilling. Start your grill and turn heat to medium.  While the grill is heating, skewer the steaks. Grill the Eel, skin side down, for three minutes.  Flip and grill another three minutes.  Turn the eel, baste with unagi sauce, and grill one minute skin side.  Flip again, baste with more unagi sauce, and grill one more minute. Until Next Time, Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(40) "dEELicious Flavors for your Summer Grill" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(246) "Summertime is for grilling: burgers, BBQ chicken, steak, and BBQ Freshwater Eel.  Yep, you heard me, BBQ eel. Fresh-caught from the rivers that feed into Lake Champlain, eel can be a delicious and unique addition to your summertime grill menu." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(40) "deelicious-flavors-for-your-summer-grill" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 07:26:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-14 11:26:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5177" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "2" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#367 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5133) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-05-19 10:09:13" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-19 14:09:13" ["post_content"]=> string(3488) " Like many people who live locally, I went to opening day of Burlington's Farmer's Market.  Also like many people, my intentions for being there were to score some local produce, people watch, and admire local handiwork.  My intentions were NOT to get a free banana, obviously not local, and a lesson on the banana trade. Upon entering the market, I was greeted by a genial man dressed as a banana.  He handed me a free banana, then delved into a passionate and shocking speech about the banana trade.  If you believe, as I do, in the power of voting with your dollar as a conscientious consumer, whether motivated by humanitarian or environmental causes, I guarantee you will change your banana shopping habits after learning what I have learned.

Shocker #1: INFERTILITY

DBCP, a pesticide introduced in the 1950's, was discovered to cause infertility in males.  Despite this knowledge, DBCP is still widely used for banana crops in developing countries, where the local residents are NOT educated on the danger of its use.

Shocker #1: MONOCULTURE

I don't know how I didn't know this, but bananas are a monoculture in many regions in Central America.  Monocultures lead to plant pathogens, diseases, and unhealthy soils, which leads to the use of dangerous agrocides, industrial fertilizers, and even extinction.

Shocker #2: TERRORISM

It's a long story, which you can learn for yourself in the documentary, Bananaland, but the cliff notes version is: the fruit company, Chiquita, knowingly funds registered terrorist groups in direct relationship to growing banana crops.

What we can do about it:

  • Buy organic
  • Buy fair trade
  • Tell your friends
What should you do with your fair trade, organic bananas? Make these tasty Gluten Free Banana Oatmeal Pancakes! *Side note: Burlington Farmer's Market has temporarily moved to 345 Pine Street Resources: Peace and Justice Center, Food Empowerment Project, Center for Science in the Public Interest Until next time, Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(40) "Go Bananas at Burlington Farmer's Market" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(183) "Vote with your dollar! Buy organic and buy fair trade! Make conscientious food choices after learning the shocking history of bananas. Gluten free banana pancake recipe included. " ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(39) "go-bananas-at-burlington-farmers-market" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-05-19 10:31:17" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-19 14:31:17" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5133" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "3" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#279 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5116) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-05-05 08:37:37" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-05 12:37:37" ["post_content"]=> string(3568) " Picture yourself learning the art of cheese making with renowned cheese maker, David Asher, or foraging for mushrooms in the beautiful rolling hills of the Northeast Kingdom, or learning the art of fermentation by the self-proclaimed "fermentation fetishist," Sandor Katz.  The School of the New American Farmstead (SNAF) at Sterling College offers you these experiences and more; visit their website for a full list of courses, and their press release for more information on the program. Be a lifelong learner!  Here's five great reasons why:

Community building

Trying new things and learning new skills as an adult scrounges up some vulnerability you probably don't experience in the rest of life.  In the midst of an online world, where social connections are often limited to virtual interactions, create real, human connections by engaging with other people in a curious and like-minded environment.

Knowledge can never be taken away from you

I was told this sentiment by a colleague, and it's true!  Your knowledge belongs to you; no one and nothing can take it from you. Pretty much everything else about you can be taken, tarnished, or damaged.  But your knowledge is yours to keep.

Ignorance may be bliss, but KNOWLEDGE is POWER

I don't disagree that ignorance may be bliss, but you would have to not know too many things to make that true.  Who wants to live their life with the knowledge and understanding of a toddler?  Armor yourself with knowledge, such that you will be prepared to have positive impact on the world around you.

Do your morning business in a tree-outhouse

If you go to SNAF, that is.  Sterling College offers rustic accommodations for a marginal fee.  Space is limited, so if this interests you, let them know!  Regardless, you get to enjoy the wild and untamed scenic experience of the Northeast Kingdom.

Resist entropy

There is no magic pill that will keep your skin and body youthful, but exercising your mental acuity will battle the deleterious effects of aging.  It will also build your self-confidence through the sense of accomplishment, and confidence is a survival skill. See you in class! -Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(43) "Five Reasons to Pursue Continuing Education" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(43) "five-reasons-to-pursue-continuing-education" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-05-05 08:40:37" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-05 12:40:37" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5116" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "3" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#279 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5116) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "8" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-05-05 08:37:37" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-05 12:37:37" ["post_content"]=> string(3568) " Picture yourself learning the art of cheese making with renowned cheese maker, David Asher, or foraging for mushrooms in the beautiful rolling hills of the Northeast Kingdom, or learning the art of fermentation by the self-proclaimed "fermentation fetishist," Sandor Katz.  The School of the New American Farmstead (SNAF) at Sterling College offers you these experiences and more; visit their website for a full list of courses, and their press release for more information on the program. Be a lifelong learner!  Here's five great reasons why:

Community building

Trying new things and learning new skills as an adult scrounges up some vulnerability you probably don't experience in the rest of life.  In the midst of an online world, where social connections are often limited to virtual interactions, create real, human connections by engaging with other people in a curious and like-minded environment.

Knowledge can never be taken away from you

I was told this sentiment by a colleague, and it's true!  Your knowledge belongs to you; no one and nothing can take it from you. Pretty much everything else about you can be taken, tarnished, or damaged.  But your knowledge is yours to keep.

Ignorance may be bliss, but KNOWLEDGE is POWER

I don't disagree that ignorance may be bliss, but you would have to not know too many things to make that true.  Who wants to live their life with the knowledge and understanding of a toddler?  Armor yourself with knowledge, such that you will be prepared to have positive impact on the world around you.

Do your morning business in a tree-outhouse

If you go to SNAF, that is.  Sterling College offers rustic accommodations for a marginal fee.  Space is limited, so if this interests you, let them know!  Regardless, you get to enjoy the wild and untamed scenic experience of the Northeast Kingdom.

Resist entropy

There is no magic pill that will keep your skin and body youthful, but exercising your mental acuity will battle the deleterious effects of aging.  It will also build your self-confidence through the sense of accomplishment, and confidence is a survival skill. See you in class! -Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(43) "Five Reasons to Pursue Continuing Education" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(43) "five-reasons-to-pursue-continuing-education" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-05-05 08:40:37" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-05 12:40:37" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5116" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "3" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["queried_object"]=> object(WP_Term)#370 (16) { ["term_id"]=> int(1) ["name"]=> string(4) "blog" ["slug"]=> string(4) "blog" ["term_group"]=> int(0) ["term_taxonomy_id"]=> int(1) ["taxonomy"]=> string(8) "category" ["description"]=> string(0) "" ["parent"]=> int(0) ["count"]=> int(164) ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["cat_ID"]=> int(1) ["category_count"]=> int(164) ["category_description"]=> string(0) "" ["cat_name"]=> string(4) "blog" ["category_nicename"]=> string(4) "blog" ["category_parent"]=> int(0) } ["queried_object_id"]=> int(1) ["comments"]=> array(3) { [0]=> &object(WP_Comment)#313 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208724" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5133" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Bronwyn Dunne" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "bronwyndunne@mac.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(34) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(11) "24.193.9.11" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-06-02 22:07:37" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-03 02:07:37" ["comment_content"]=> string(409) "It's so funny that there is a danger to the pesticides used on bananas. I remember long ago my mother feeling that bananas were excellent fruit to give us children since she didn't have to wash them and were so easy for long trips, etc. But, a year or so ago, I stopped eating bananas, a fruit I used often sliced on my granola...and, I felt better. Who knows but with food, I think there are no coincidences." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children:protected"]=> array(1) { [208725]=> object(WP_Comment)#287 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208725" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5133" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Corrie Austin" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(35) "bronwyn@inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(14) "162.247.90.114" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-06-05 07:16:27" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-05 11:16:27" ["comment_content"]=> string(328) "There's a reason we are friends! I agree with so many of the things you just said. I agree - food can either be our medicine or our disease. I have not stopped eating bananas, but I am careful to source them organic and fair trade. I also rely on the "dirty dozen" and "clean fifteen" lists for guidance while I grocery shop." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(6) "208724" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [1]=> &object(WP_Comment)#287 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208725" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5133" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Corrie Austin" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(35) "bronwyn@inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(14) "162.247.90.114" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-06-05 07:16:27" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-05 11:16:27" ["comment_content"]=> string(328) "There's a reason we are friends! I agree with so many of the things you just said. I agree - food can either be our medicine or our disease. I have not stopped eating bananas, but I am careful to source them organic and fair trade. I also rely on the "dirty dozen" and "clean fifteen" lists for guidance while I grocery shop." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(6) "208724" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [2]=> &object(WP_Comment)#285 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208734" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5133" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Kellie Kutkey" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(17) "kkutkey@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "98.246.70.94" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-09-16 19:41:07" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-09-16 23:41:07" ["comment_content"]=> string(429) "Hi Corrie, I remember hearing about how bananas used to come in all sorts of sizes and shapes, etc. but the one we got is the most economical to produce (it's all about the dollar, grrr). Kinda like corn. I wonder if you can have a link to the dirty dozen and the clean fifteen on your blog? I reference them and then immediately forget . . . except for apples. It bums me out that they are on the dirty dozen list :( Thanks!!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } } ["comments_by_type"]=> array(4) { ["comment"]=> array(3) { [0]=> &object(WP_Comment)#313 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208724" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5133" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Bronwyn Dunne" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(20) "bronwyndunne@mac.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(34) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(11) "24.193.9.11" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-06-02 22:07:37" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-03 02:07:37" ["comment_content"]=> string(409) "It's so funny that there is a danger to the pesticides used on bananas. I remember long ago my mother feeling that bananas were excellent fruit to give us children since she didn't have to wash them and were so easy for long trips, etc. But, a year or so ago, I stopped eating bananas, a fruit I used often sliced on my granola...and, I felt better. Who knows but with food, I think there are no coincidences." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children:protected"]=> array(1) { [208725]=> object(WP_Comment)#287 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208725" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5133" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Corrie Austin" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(35) "bronwyn@inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(14) "162.247.90.114" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-06-05 07:16:27" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-05 11:16:27" ["comment_content"]=> string(328) "There's a reason we are friends! I agree with so many of the things you just said. I agree - food can either be our medicine or our disease. I have not stopped eating bananas, but I am careful to source them organic and fair trade. I also rely on the "dirty dozen" and "clean fifteen" lists for guidance while I grocery shop." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(6) "208724" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [1]=> &object(WP_Comment)#287 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208725" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5133" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Corrie Austin" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(35) "bronwyn@inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(14) "162.247.90.114" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-06-05 07:16:27" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-06-05 11:16:27" ["comment_content"]=> string(328) "There's a reason we are friends! I agree with so many of the things you just said. I agree - food can either be our medicine or our disease. I have not stopped eating bananas, but I am careful to source them organic and fair trade. I also rely on the "dirty dozen" and "clean fifteen" lists for guidance while I grocery shop." ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(6) "208724" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "1" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } [2]=> &object(WP_Comment)#285 (18) { ["comment_ID"]=> string(6) "208734" ["comment_post_ID"]=> string(4) "5133" ["comment_author"]=> string(13) "Kellie Kutkey" ["comment_author_email"]=> string(17) "kkutkey@gmail.com" ["comment_author_url"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_author_IP"]=> string(12) "98.246.70.94" ["comment_date"]=> string(19) "2019-09-16 19:41:07" ["comment_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-09-16 23:41:07" ["comment_content"]=> string(429) "Hi Corrie, I remember hearing about how bananas used to come in all sorts of sizes and shapes, etc. but the one we got is the most economical to produce (it's all about the dollar, grrr). Kinda like corn. I wonder if you can have a link to the dirty dozen and the clean fifteen on your blog? I reference them and then immediately forget . . . except for apples. It bums me out that they are on the dirty dozen list :( Thanks!!" ["comment_karma"]=> string(1) "0" ["comment_approved"]=> string(1) "1" ["comment_agent"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_parent"]=> string(1) "0" ["user_id"]=> string(1) "0" ["children:protected"]=> array(0) { } ["populated_children:protected"]=> bool(true) ["post_fields:protected"]=> array(21) { [0]=> string(11) "post_author" [1]=> string(9) "post_date" [2]=> string(13) "post_date_gmt" [3]=> string(12) "post_content" [4]=> string(10) "post_title" [5]=> string(12) "post_excerpt" [6]=> string(11) "post_status" [7]=> string(14) "comment_status" [8]=> string(11) "ping_status" [9]=> string(9) "post_name" [10]=> string(7) "to_ping" [11]=> string(6) "pinged" [12]=> string(13) "post_modified" [13]=> string(17) "post_modified_gmt" [14]=> string(21) "post_content_filtered" [15]=> string(11) "post_parent" [16]=> string(4) "guid" [17]=> string(10) "menu_order" [18]=> string(9) "post_type" [19]=> string(14) "post_mime_type" [20]=> string(13) "comment_count" } } } ["trackback"]=> array(0) { } ["pingback"]=> array(0) { } ["pings"]=> array(0) { } } }
SUBSCRIBE TO THIS BLOG’S FEED

3 responses to “Five Reasons to Pursue Continuing Education”

  1. Laurie Burke says:

    This is a very clever and engaging piece – loved reading it! Always interesting – always fun. Can’t wait for the next one!

    • Corrie Austin says:

      Thanks for the kind feedback!
      It really makes me want to sign up for the courses…how fun would that be!
      Take care,
      Corrie

  2. Kellie Kutkey says:

    Hi Corrie,
    I love hearing about things like this . . . I think one needs to be in my future . . . especially regarding a pharmaceutical herb garden.
    Interested? We could make it a plan!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


 

flickrinejoin

TASTY PICKS

Good Food & Noteworthy Businesses

Hardwick Beef Ad #2

 


a La Carte Videos

Bronwyn Dunne and Judith Jones Prepare Two Potato Salads at Bryn Teg. See the recipes


Gateau de Crepes- In Molly’s Kitchen.
See recipe from the Smitten Kitchen



Blog Archives

Recipe Archives

  • Three New Must-Haves For Your Spice Cabinet - Jul 2019
  • Unagi – Preparation and Serving Suggestions - Jun 2019
  • Go Bananas at Burlington Farmer’s Market - May 2019
  • Gluten Free Banana Oatmeal Pancakes - May 2019
  • A Love Affair with Fermented Fare - Mar 2019
  • Strong Hands + Patience: Recipes for Home Fermenting - Jan 2019
  • Muffins posing as cupcakes - Dec 2018
  • ‘Tis the Season - Dec 2018
  • Four Things I learned in Cooking Class - Oct 2018
  • Moussaka - Oct 2018
  • I Love Early Fall…From My Head…To-ma-toes - Sep 2018
  • Three uses for a bounty of apples - Aug 2018
  • Strawberry Rhubarb Salsa - Jul 2018
  • Egg White Casserole with Sweet Potato Crust - Apr 2018
  • Chicken Dijonaise – Slow Cooker: The Best Cookbook Ever - Feb 2018
  • Winter Root Soup – Nourishing Traditions - Feb 2018
  • Soooo Many Momos - Sep 2017
  • Sautéed Fiddleheads in Butter with Lemon and Garlic - May 2017
  • A Recipe for the Holidays from Shelburne Farms - Nov 2013
  • The “Zetterburger” Recipe - Aug 2013
  • Homemade Fresh Mozzarella Recipe - Jul 2013
  • Twin Farms’ Gluten-Free Soufflé Pancake Recipe - Jun 2013
  • Potato Salad Two Ways - Mar 2013
  • It’s Easy Being Green—If You’re a Soup! - Feb 2013
  • For The Love of Valentine’s Day, A Chocolate Mousse - Feb 2013
  • Happy New Year Resolutions – Roasted Root Vegetables - Jan 2013
  • The Best Cheesecake in the World - Dec 2012
  • Tarte aux Pommes – A Holiday Gift to You - Dec 2012
  • A Thanksgiving Memory with a Memorable Brining Recipe - Nov 2012
  • Chicken with Artichokes & Honey – The Recipe - Nov 2012
  • Alison Baker’s Tomato Coconut Soup - Oct 2012
  • Basil, Lettuce and Tomato Sandwich – The Recipe - Oct 2012
  • Cold Pea Soup- The Recipe - Sep 2012
  • Onion Tart with Anchovies & Black Olives- Recipe for Pissaladiere Nicoise - Sep 2012
  • Boeuf Bourguignon - Apr 2012
  • Gingery Shrimp with Asparagus and Edamame - Apr 2012
  • Salisbury Steak - Apr 2012