A culinary online center dedicated to promoting the importance and the joy of American home cooking with an emphasis on local products and talent, celebrating the unique spirit and energy of the new food world ethos, especially in Vermont.

amuse bouche

I love quotes that add meaning to my life. Here are a few to live by:

Approach love and cooking with reckless abandon.
—The Dalai Lama

Rhubarb is a metaphor for finding happiness in your own backyard.
—Garrison Keillor

Buy your snacks from a farmers’ market.
—Michael Pollan

Even when he had a garden in Paris, Thomas Jefferson cultivated Indian corn, “to eat green in our manner, …as quickly after it left the stalk as possible.
—Evan Jones, from American Food

Abundant Autumn Apples

Apples seem to appear everywhere these days.  Thankful for a robust season fueled by rain, abundant sunshine and cooler temps, I see apple laden trees on my daily walks, flanking roadsides and handmade signs for apple picking pointing the way. Lately, I’m also greeted by bags and wooden crates brimming with apples front and center as I enter our local market- a table of pies stacked high and freshly baked, apple of course!  Apple season is here!

As I write my first official BLOG post for my dear friend Bronwyn, apples are the perfect topic. First, I needed to join her in apple picking and make homemade fresh applesauce together. I planned to learn a few “pearls of wisdom” from her.   Honestly, I don’t ever recall making applesauce before, and I was about to discover how easy it is and just pure simple fun.

One early fall afternoon, a few of us gathered at Bryn Teg, Bronwyn’s beloved NEK retreat to pick apples and pears from trees in her expansive front yard that sits high on a hill and looks west toward Caspian Lake and the Lowell mountain range.    Joining the outing was a young woman from Portugal, a Tufts University fellowship student, studying C diff, who was visiting Vermont for her first time.  Carolina shared stories of picking apples as a young girl in her small village to earn a few dollars.  She was thrilled have the chance to pick with with us- it gave her a sense of home.   These were wild apples, gnarled and spotted – not exactly perfect looking –like the ones you shine up to bring to your beloved grade school teacher.  But once you bite into them – WOW- crisp, tart and a bit sweet too- delicious. Wild apples have a special place in our world.

With a large basket full, the following day, Bronwyn and I made applesauce in the charming Bryn Teg kitchen over the same classic stove that Judith Jones, her stepmother had cooked on for decades.   As always, my time in the kitchen with Bronwyn offers a few special tricks and deviations that she infuses into almost everything she prepares.  Like me, she does not follow a recipe exactly.  I watched her leave a few apple peels on the apples as we both tossed the flesh into the bowl.  They add some flavor, she said as she smiled. And you don’t always need to add cinnamon to applesauce-sometimes you just want the pure flavor of the apples.   We made a delicious roasted pork to accompany the applesauce, added a simple kale salad and savored what was a perfect fall meal.

I was curious about the legend of Johnny Appleseed.  I learned that September 26 is one of two days we celebrate this man- the other being March 11.  Born on September 26th, 1774 in Leominster, Massachusettes, his real name was John Chapman. His dream was solely to produce so many apples that no one would ever go hungry.  He spent 50 years walking the countryside planting apple trees and creating nurseries. He died at age seventy-one after marking a huge mark on the world of apples.

There are countless apple orchards in Vermont begging to be visited.   My favorite is Shelburne Orchards located off Bostwick Road just beyond the turn to Shelburne Beach. You’ll be sure to find jovial fun spirited Nick Cowles, the proud owner, driving a cart offering wild or tame rides out to distant trees regaling stories the entire way. You can sample his apple brandy in a quaint tasting room or take home at least a dozen of his famed apple cider donuts from his charming  farm stand.

As apple season begins to wind down I have committed to making as many things apple as I can- applesauce- apple crisp – baked apple – Apple Betty and braised apples.  And, apple sauce freezes well and can be enjoyed winter long.  It’s not too late to get out and pick apples but frosty days are on our horizon so the time is now.

I am honored to be the next writer for In the Kitchen with Bronwynand look forward to sharing posts on a range of culinary topics with a focus on our local food landscape. I encourage and welcome your comments and suggestions. And deep gratitude to Corrie Austin who has shared playful, fun and engaging posts during the past two years.  I hope to do the same.

Laurie Caswell Burke(Writer, Teacher, lover of Vermont and good food)

Posted: 10-6-2019

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Apples seem to appear everywhere these days.  Thankful for a robust season fueled by rain, abundant sunshine and cooler temps, I see apple laden trees on my daily walks, flanking roadsides and handmade signs for apple picking pointing the way. Lately, I’m also greeted by bags and wooden crates brimming with apples front and center as I enter our local market- a table of pies stacked high and freshly baked, apple of course!  Apple season is here!

As I write my first official BLOG post for my dear friend Bronwyn, apples are the perfect topic. First, I needed to join her in apple picking and make homemade fresh applesauce together. I planned to learn a few “pearls of wisdom” from her.   Honestly, I don’t ever recall making applesauce before, and I was about to discover how easy it is and just pure simple fun.



One early fall afternoon, a few of us gathered at Bryn Teg, Bronwyn’s beloved NEK retreat to pick apples and pears from trees in her expansive front yard that sits high on a hill and looks west toward Caspian Lake and the Lowell mountain range.    Joining the outing was a young woman from Portugal, a Tufts University fellowship student, studying C diff, who was visiting Vermont for her first time.  Carolina shared stories of picking apples as a young girl in her small village to earn a few dollars.  She was thrilled have the chance to pick with with us- it gave her a sense of home.   These were wild apples, gnarled and spotted - not exactly perfect looking –like the ones you shine up to bring to your beloved grade school teacher.  But once you bite into them – WOW- crisp, tart and a bit sweet too- delicious. Wild apples have a special place in our world.



With a large basket full, the following day, Bronwyn and I made applesauce in the charming Bryn Teg kitchen over the same classic stove that Judith Jones, her stepmother had cooked on for decades.   As always, my time in the kitchen with Bronwyn offers a few special tricks and deviations that she infuses into almost everything she prepares.  Like me, she does not follow a recipe exactly.  I watched her leave a few apple peels on the apples as we both tossed the flesh into the bowl.  They add some flavor, she said as she smiled. And you don’t always need to add cinnamon to applesauce-sometimes you just want the pure flavor of the apples.   We made a delicious roasted pork to accompany the applesauce, added a simple kale salad and savored what was a perfect fall meal.



I was curious about the legend of Johnny Appleseed.  I learned that September 26 is one of two days we celebrate this man- the other being March 11.  Born on September 26th, 1774 in Leominster, Massachusettes, his real name was John Chapman. His dream was solely to produce so many apples that no one would ever go hungry.  He spent 50 years walking the countryside planting apple trees and creating nurseries. He died at age seventy-one after marking a huge mark on the world of apples.

There are countless apple orchards in Vermont begging to be visited.   My favorite is Shelburne Orchards located off Bostwick Road just beyond the turn to Shelburne Beach. You’ll be sure to find jovial fun spirited Nick Cowles, the proud owner, driving a cart offering wild or tame rides out to distant trees regaling stories the entire way. You can sample his apple brandy in a quaint tasting room or take home at least a dozen of his famed apple cider donuts from his charming  farm stand.



As apple season begins to wind down I have committed to making as many things apple as I can- applesauce- apple crisp – baked apple – Apple Betty and braised apples.  And, apple sauce freezes well and can be enjoyed winter long.  It’s not too late to get out and pick apples but frosty days are on our horizon so the time is now.

I am honored to be the next writer for In the Kitchen with Bronwynand look forward to sharing posts on a range of culinary topics with a focus on our local food landscape. I encourage and welcome your comments and suggestions. And deep gratitude to Corrie Austin who has shared playful, fun and engaging posts during the past two years.  I hope to do the same.

Laurie Caswell Burke(Writer, Teacher, lover of Vermont and good food)"
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Apples seem to appear everywhere these days.  Thankful for a robust season fueled by rain, abundant sunshine and cooler temps, I see apple laden trees on my daily walks, flanking roadsides and handmade signs for apple picking pointing the way. Lately, I’m also greeted by bags and wooden crates brimming with apples front and center as I enter our local market- a table of pies stacked high and freshly baked, apple of course!  Apple season is here!

As I write my first official BLOG post for my dear friend Bronwyn, apples are the perfect topic. First, I needed to join her in apple picking and make homemade fresh applesauce together. I planned to learn a few “pearls of wisdom” from her.   Honestly, I don’t ever recall making applesauce before, and I was about to discover how easy it is and just pure simple fun.



One early fall afternoon, a few of us gathered at Bryn Teg, Bronwyn’s beloved NEK retreat to pick apples and pears from trees in her expansive front yard that sits high on a hill and looks west toward Caspian Lake and the Lowell mountain range.    Joining the outing was a young woman from Portugal, a Tufts University fellowship student, studying C diff, who was visiting Vermont for her first time.  Carolina shared stories of picking apples as a young girl in her small village to earn a few dollars.  She was thrilled have the chance to pick with with us- it gave her a sense of home.   These were wild apples, gnarled and spotted - not exactly perfect looking –like the ones you shine up to bring to your beloved grade school teacher.  But once you bite into them – WOW- crisp, tart and a bit sweet too- delicious. Wild apples have a special place in our world.



With a large basket full, the following day, Bronwyn and I made applesauce in the charming Bryn Teg kitchen over the same classic stove that Judith Jones, her stepmother had cooked on for decades.   As always, my time in the kitchen with Bronwyn offers a few special tricks and deviations that she infuses into almost everything she prepares.  Like me, she does not follow a recipe exactly.  I watched her leave a few apple peels on the apples as we both tossed the flesh into the bowl.  They add some flavor, she said as she smiled. And you don’t always need to add cinnamon to applesauce-sometimes you just want the pure flavor of the apples.   We made a delicious roasted pork to accompany the applesauce, added a simple kale salad and savored what was a perfect fall meal.



I was curious about the legend of Johnny Appleseed.  I learned that September 26 is one of two days we celebrate this man- the other being March 11.  Born on September 26th, 1774 in Leominster, Massachusettes, his real name was John Chapman. His dream was solely to produce so many apples that no one would ever go hungry.  He spent 50 years walking the countryside planting apple trees and creating nurseries. He died at age seventy-one after marking a huge mark on the world of apples.

There are countless apple orchards in Vermont begging to be visited.   My favorite is Shelburne Orchards located off Bostwick Road just beyond the turn to Shelburne Beach. You’ll be sure to find jovial fun spirited Nick Cowles, the proud owner, driving a cart offering wild or tame rides out to distant trees regaling stories the entire way. You can sample his apple brandy in a quaint tasting room or take home at least a dozen of his famed apple cider donuts from his charming  farm stand.



As apple season begins to wind down I have committed to making as many things apple as I can- applesauce- apple crisp – baked apple – Apple Betty and braised apples.  And, apple sauce freezes well and can be enjoyed winter long.  It’s not too late to get out and pick apples but frosty days are on our horizon so the time is now.

I am honored to be the next writer for In the Kitchen with Bronwynand look forward to sharing posts on a range of culinary topics with a focus on our local food landscape. I encourage and welcome your comments and suggestions. And deep gratitude to Corrie Austin who has shared playful, fun and engaging posts during the past two years.  I hope to do the same.

Laurie Caswell Burke(Writer, Teacher, lover of Vermont and good food)"
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As I write my first official BLOG post for my dear friend Bronwyn, apples are the perfect topic. First, I needed to join her in apple picking and make homemade fresh applesauce together. I planned to learn a few “pearls of wisdom” from her.   Honestly, I don’t ever recall making applesauce before, and I was about to discover how easy it is and just pure simple fun.



One early fall afternoon, a few of us gathered at Bryn Teg, Bronwyn’s beloved NEK retreat to pick apples and pears from trees in her expansive front yard that sits high on a hill and looks west toward Caspian Lake and the Lowell mountain range.    Joining the outing was a young woman from Portugal, a Tufts University fellowship student, studying C diff, who was visiting Vermont for her first time.  Carolina shared stories of picking apples as a young girl in her small village to earn a few dollars.  She was thrilled have the chance to pick with with us- it gave her a sense of home.   These were wild apples, gnarled and spotted - not exactly perfect looking –like the ones you shine up to bring to your beloved grade school teacher.  But once you bite into them – WOW- crisp, tart and a bit sweet too- delicious. Wild apples have a special place in our world.



With a large basket full, the following day, Bronwyn and I made applesauce in the charming Bryn Teg kitchen over the same classic stove that Judith Jones, her stepmother had cooked on for decades.   As always, my time in the kitchen with Bronwyn offers a few special tricks and deviations that she infuses into almost everything she prepares.  Like me, she does not follow a recipe exactly.  I watched her leave a few apple peels on the apples as we both tossed the flesh into the bowl.  They add some flavor, she said as she smiled. And you don’t always need to add cinnamon to applesauce-sometimes you just want the pure flavor of the apples.   We made a delicious roasted pork to accompany the applesauce, added a simple kale salad and savored what was a perfect fall meal.



I was curious about the legend of Johnny Appleseed.  I learned that September 26 is one of two days we celebrate this man- the other being March 11.  Born on September 26th, 1774 in Leominster, Massachusettes, his real name was John Chapman. His dream was solely to produce so many apples that no one would ever go hungry.  He spent 50 years walking the countryside planting apple trees and creating nurseries. He died at age seventy-one after marking a huge mark on the world of apples.

There are countless apple orchards in Vermont begging to be visited.   My favorite is Shelburne Orchards located off Bostwick Road just beyond the turn to Shelburne Beach. You’ll be sure to find jovial fun spirited Nick Cowles, the proud owner, driving a cart offering wild or tame rides out to distant trees regaling stories the entire way. You can sample his apple brandy in a quaint tasting room or take home at least a dozen of his famed apple cider donuts from his charming  farm stand.



As apple season begins to wind down I have committed to making as many things apple as I can- applesauce- apple crisp – baked apple – Apple Betty and braised apples.  And, apple sauce freezes well and can be enjoyed winter long.  It’s not too late to get out and pick apples but frosty days are on our horizon so the time is now.

I am honored to be the next writer for In the Kitchen with Bronwynand look forward to sharing posts on a range of culinary topics with a focus on our local food landscape. I encourage and welcome your comments and suggestions. And deep gratitude to Corrie Austin who has shared playful, fun and engaging posts during the past two years.  I hope to do the same.

Laurie Caswell Burke(Writer, Teacher, lover of Vermont and good food)"
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9 responses to “Abundant Autumn Apples”

  1. Welcome, Laurie Burke, to inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com. Love your story about apples. Johnny Appleseeed was definitetly a hero in New England. What would we do without all those wonderful apple trees!! Yum!

    And thank you to Corrie Austin whose lively and fun posts have sustained ITKWB for the last two years, while raising a gaggle of ducks and a hen coop of chickens…and learning the joys of gardening and cooking in Vermont. Your stories will enhance the ITKWB archives for years to come!

  2. Laurie says:

    Laurie SHARES: Saturday October 19th is the annual TRUCK LOAD and CAR LOAD sale at SHELBURNE ORCHARDS! For $50 you can have all the apples off the ground ONLY that fit in your car and for a pick-up truck it’s $100! WOW! IT promises to be awesome this year. And just think of all the apple creations you can make!

  3. Anna Dibble says:

    My husband and I made applesauce every fall with wild apples found (and stolen?!) on and under various trees in southern vermont. We washed them in the sink, cut them in half and loaded them into a big pot with some water. never bothered peeling, and they have their own moisture so you don’t need much water. Boiled until soft then put them through the Foley food mill. No sugar, no cinnamon. Froze a lot and ate it all winter.

  4. Kate Burke says:

    Looks awesome! I’ve enjoyed every apple dish you have made thus far and am looking forward to even more.

  5. Corrie Austin says:

    I was equally thrilled to learn how simple applesauce is to make. Dynapower, where I work, has tons of apple trees, so I have been collecting and plan to do my applesauce making this weekend. YUM! Thank you for writing such a sentimental post.

  6. Bronwyn says:

    Anne- I so enjoyed our fall cooking together – apples and pears and enjoying nor’easter activities that kept us inside and chefing up great food with a focus on APPLES! Always a treasure to cook with you dear friend! Till our next cooking adventure!
    Thanks for sharing this lovely sentiment! – Laurie

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