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I love quotes that add meaning to my life. Here are a few to live by:

Americans who have been to France and come home craving a reminder of their magical European experience, love Vermont cheeses.
—Allison Hooper, founder, VT Butter & Cheese Creamery

Practice not cleaning your plate: it will help you eat less in short term and develop self-control in the long term.
—Michael Pollan

Sweet taste buds develop before all others, that’s why small children love sweets.
—Bronwyn Dunne

Don’t eat breakfast cereals that change the color of milk.
—Michael Pollan

My rule of thumb is, when in doubt, cook more than you think you may need.
—Marian Cunningham, from Learning to Cook


A Thanksgiving Memory with a Memorable Brining Recipe

My stepmother, Judith Jones, and I will be cooking Thanksgiving dinner at my son, Matt’s, apartment on Broome Street in New York City this year. I decided to bring a fresh Vermont turkey down to the Big City, and, having made that decision, I inspired Judith to think about brining the turkey. A phone call later, I was copying down a brining recipe that she had remembered from a Thanksgiving long ago in the Northeast Kingdom.

My father, Evan Jones, and stepmother had only lived in their new summer house, Bryn Teg, high on a mountainside in the “Kingdom,” as it is called by locals, for a month when an editor suggested that they keep a journal about their experiences cooking in their new home. The editor thought it might become an interesting book. The second year, with Thanksgiving approaching, they decided to celebrate in the little house with the extraordinary views of the Green Mountains. For the occasion, they bought an electric smoker. It was a novel idea at the time and they decided to brine the turkey as well, to ensure delectable flavor.  

My fresh Vermont turkey reminded Judith of the brining recipe in the journal, put away long ago, when the book idea was not pursued. With delight, she read the list of ingredients to me and I share them with you–just in time for a delicious holiday dinner!

TURKEY BRINING RECIPE

Ingredients:
4 quarts of water
2 cups of kosher salt
1 cup of sugar
5 teaspoons saltpeter
½ teapoon powdered ginger
½ teaspoon mace
½ teaspoon coriander
6 whole cloves
20 black pepper corns
5 whole bay leaves
5 tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce

Directions:
Pour the water into a kettle or bowl large enough to hold the turkey allowing it to be covered completely by the brine. Add all the ingredients and mix thoroughly. Place the turkey in the chosen container, cover and leave it in the refrigerator for 3 to 4 days.

When you are ready to roast the turkey, take it out of the brine and pat dry both inside and out. Stuff the turkey and roast as directed in your own recipe.

Happy Thanksgiving to all my blog readers with happiness and love for you and your families as you enjoy the wonderful dishes that you’ve prepared in your own kitchens this Thanksgiving Day, 2012.

A Bientot!

Posted: 11-17-2012

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My stepmother, Judith Jones, and I will be cooking Thanksgiving dinner at my son, Matt’s, apartment on Broome Street in New York City this year. I decided to bring a fresh Vermont turkey down to the Big City, and, having made that decision, I inspired Judith to think about brining the turkey. A phone call later, I was copying down a brining recipe that she had remembered from a Thanksgiving long ago in the Northeast Kingdom.

My father, Evan Jones, and stepmother had only lived in their new summer house, Bryn Teg, high on a mountainside in the “Kingdom," as it is called by locals, for a month when an editor suggested that they keep a journal about their experiences cooking in their new home. The editor thought it might become an interesting book. The second year, with Thanksgiving approaching, they decided to celebrate in the little house with the extraordinary views of the Green Mountains. For the occasion, they bought an electric smoker. It was a novel idea at the time and they decided to brine the turkey as well, to ensure delectable flavor.  

My fresh Vermont turkey reminded Judith of the brining recipe in the journal, put away long ago, when the book idea was not pursued. With delight, she read the list of ingredients to me and I share them with you–just in time for a delicious holiday dinner!

TURKEY BRINING RECIPE

Ingredients:
4 quarts of water
2 cups of kosher salt
1 cup of sugar
5 teaspoons saltpeter
½ teapoon powdered ginger
½ teaspoon mace
½ teaspoon coriander
6 whole cloves
20 black pepper corns
5 whole bay leaves
5 tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce

Directions:
Pour the water into a kettle or bowl large enough to hold the turkey allowing it to be covered completely by the brine. Add all the ingredients and mix thoroughly. Place the turkey in the chosen container, cover and leave it in the refrigerator for 3 to 4 days.

When you are ready to roast the turkey, take it out of the brine and pat dry both inside and out. Stuff the turkey and roast as directed in your own recipe.

Happy Thanksgiving to all my blog readers with happiness and love for you and your families as you enjoy the wonderful dishes that you've prepared in your own kitchens this Thanksgiving Day, 2012.

A Bientot!

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My stepmother, Judith Jones, and I will be cooking Thanksgiving dinner at my son, Matt’s, apartment on Broome Street in New York City this year. I decided to bring a fresh Vermont turkey down to the Big City, and, having made that decision, I inspired Judith to think about brining the turkey. A phone call later, I was copying down a brining recipe that she had remembered from a Thanksgiving long ago in the Northeast Kingdom.

My father, Evan Jones, and stepmother had only lived in their new summer house, Bryn Teg, high on a mountainside in the “Kingdom," as it is called by locals, for a month when an editor suggested that they keep a journal about their experiences cooking in their new home. The editor thought it might become an interesting book. The second year, with Thanksgiving approaching, they decided to celebrate in the little house with the extraordinary views of the Green Mountains. For the occasion, they bought an electric smoker. It was a novel idea at the time and they decided to brine the turkey as well, to ensure delectable flavor.  

My fresh Vermont turkey reminded Judith of the brining recipe in the journal, put away long ago, when the book idea was not pursued. With delight, she read the list of ingredients to me and I share them with you–just in time for a delicious holiday dinner!

TURKEY BRINING RECIPE

Ingredients:
4 quarts of water
2 cups of kosher salt
1 cup of sugar
5 teaspoons saltpeter
½ teapoon powdered ginger
½ teaspoon mace
½ teaspoon coriander
6 whole cloves
20 black pepper corns
5 whole bay leaves
5 tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce

Directions:
Pour the water into a kettle or bowl large enough to hold the turkey allowing it to be covered completely by the brine. Add all the ingredients and mix thoroughly. Place the turkey in the chosen container, cover and leave it in the refrigerator for 3 to 4 days.

When you are ready to roast the turkey, take it out of the brine and pat dry both inside and out. Stuff the turkey and roast as directed in your own recipe.

Happy Thanksgiving to all my blog readers with happiness and love for you and your families as you enjoy the wonderful dishes that you've prepared in your own kitchens this Thanksgiving Day, 2012.

A Bientot!

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My father, Evan Jones, and stepmother had only lived in their new summer house, Bryn Teg, high on a mountainside in the “Kingdom," as it is called by locals, for a month when an editor suggested that they keep a journal about their experiences cooking in their new home. The editor thought it might become an interesting book. The second year, with Thanksgiving approaching, they decided to celebrate in the little house with the extraordinary views of the Green Mountains. For the occasion, they bought an electric smoker. It was a novel idea at the time and they decided to brine the turkey as well, to ensure delectable flavor.  

My fresh Vermont turkey reminded Judith of the brining recipe in the journal, put away long ago, when the book idea was not pursued. With delight, she read the list of ingredients to me and I share them with you–just in time for a delicious holiday dinner!

TURKEY BRINING RECIPE

Ingredients:
4 quarts of water
2 cups of kosher salt
1 cup of sugar
5 teaspoons saltpeter
½ teapoon powdered ginger
½ teaspoon mace
½ teaspoon coriander
6 whole cloves
20 black pepper corns
5 whole bay leaves
5 tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce

Directions:
Pour the water into a kettle or bowl large enough to hold the turkey allowing it to be covered completely by the brine. Add all the ingredients and mix thoroughly. Place the turkey in the chosen container, cover and leave it in the refrigerator for 3 to 4 days.

When you are ready to roast the turkey, take it out of the brine and pat dry both inside and out. Stuff the turkey and roast as directed in your own recipe.

Happy Thanksgiving to all my blog readers with happiness and love for you and your families as you enjoy the wonderful dishes that you've prepared in your own kitchens this Thanksgiving Day, 2012.

A Bientot!

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3 responses to “A Thanksgiving Memory with a Memorable Brining Recipe”

  1. Sirena Helmlinger says:

    I sent this to my husband and he is steadily working his way through your lists. We’ve ticked 3 offf so far (my girls thank you for giving their dad ideas for their Saturday adventures!) Well done on compliling them and thanks for sharing:)Nikki Smith

  2. Bronwyn says:

    Thank you, Nikki, I’m glad that the Saturday adventures are food adventures. I loved to cook with my dad. This weekend, I will teaching a private cooking class to a father and his daughters. We will make a souffle. Maybe I will write a blog post about it and that will be another recipe you can work on….

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