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amuse bouche

I love quotes that add meaning to my life. Here are a few to live by:

Approach love and cooking with reckless abandon.
—The Dalai Lama

Rhubarb is a metaphor for finding happiness in your own backyard.
—Garrison Keillor

Buy your snacks from a farmers’ market.
—Michael Pollan

Even when he had a garden in Paris, Thomas Jefferson cultivated Indian corn, “to eat green in our manner, …as quickly after it left the stalk as possible.
—Evan Jones, from American Food

Onion Tart with Anchovies & Black Olives- Recipe for Pissaladiere Nicoise

Pissaladiere Nicoise:  Onion Tart with Anchovies and Black Olives

 Recipe adapted from Mastering the Art of French Cooking by Julia Child

This is not a quiche, properly speaking it contains no eggs. In Nice, France it is made either in a pastry shell or on a flat round of bread dough like the Italian pizza.

 For 4 to 6 servings

 Ingredients:

2 lbs. minced onions

4 Tb olive oil

4 parsley sprigs

¼ tsp thyme

½ bay leaf, crumbled

2 cloves unpeeled garlic

½ tsp salt

1 pinch of powdered cloves

1/8 tsp pepper

8 canned anchovy filets

16 pitted black olives (the dry Mediterranean type)

1 Tb olive oil

 Cook the onions very slowly in the olive oil with the herbs, garlic, and salt for 1 hour, or until very tender. Discard herb bouquet and garlic. Stir in cloves and pepper, and taste carefully for seasoning.

 For an 8-inch partially cooked pastry shell on a baking sheet:

 2 cups all-purpose flour

1 tsp salt

½ tsp sugar

6 ounces (1 ½ sticks) chilled butter cut into ½ -inch bits

4 Tb chilled shortening

A scant half-cup of iced water, plus droplets more as needed

 Place flour, salt, sugar, butter, and vegetable shortening in a big mixing bowl. Rub the flour and fat together rapidly between the tips of your fingers until the fat is broken into pieces the size of oatmeal flakes. Do not overdo this step, as the fat will be blended more thoroughly later.

 Add the water and blend quickly with one hand, fingers held together and slightly cupped, as you rapidly gather the dough into a mass. Sprinkle up to 1 tablespoon more water by droplets over any unmassed remains and add them tot the main body of the dough. Then press the dough firmly into a roughly shaped ball. It should just hold together and be pliable, but not sticky.

 The fraissage:

 Place the dough on a lightly floured pastry board. With the heel of one hand, not the palm which is too warm, rapidly press the pastry by two-spoonfuls bits down on the board and away from you in a firm, quick smear of about 6 inches. This constitutes the final blending of fat and flour, or fraisage. With a scraper or spatula, gather the dough again into a mass; knead it briefly into a fairly smooth round ball. Sprinkle it lightly with flour and wrap it in waxed paper. Either place the dough in the freezing compartment of the refrigerator for about 1 hour until it is firm but not congealed, or refrigerate for 2 hours or overnight.

 Rolling out the dough:

 Roll out the dough as quickly as possible, so that it will not soften and become difficult to handle.

Place the dough on a lightly floured board or marble. If the dough is hard, beat it with the rolling pin to soften it. Then knead it briefly into a fairly flat circle. It should be just malleable enough to roll out without cracking.

 Lightly flour the top of the dough. Place rolling pin across center and roll the pin back and forth with firm but gentle pressure to start the dough moving. Then with a firm, even stroke, and always rolling away from you, start just below the center of the dough and roll to within an inch of the far edge.

 In this way, roll the dough into a circle 1/8 inch thick and about 2 inches larger all around thena your pie pan or flan ring. The dough should be used as soon as it has been rolled out, so that it will not soften.

Making a pastry shell:

 Once you have rolled the dough over the rolling pin, quickly unroll it over, either the cake pan or flan ring set on a baking sheet you are using. Press the dough lightly into the bottom of the cake pan, or onto the baking sheet if you are using a flan ring. Then lift the edges of the dough and work it gently down the inside edges of mold with your fingers, taking in about 3/8 inch of dough all around the circumference. Trim off excess dough by rolling the pin over the top of the mold.

With your thumbs, push the dough 1/8 inch above the edge of the mold, to make an even, rounded rim of dough all around the inside circumference of the mold. Press a decorative edge around the rim of the pastry with the dull edge of a knife.

 Prick bottom of pastry with a fork at 1/2–inch intervals. To keep the sides of the pastry shell from collapsing and the bottom from puffing up, either butter the bottom of another mold or lightweight foil. Weigh the foil or mold with a handful of dry beans and place it inside of the pastry. This will hold the sides of the pastry against the mold while the shell is baking.

Set the oven temperature to 400-degrees. Bake the shell at the middle level of a preheated 400-degree oven for 8 – 9 minutes until pastry is set. Remove mold or foil and beans. Prick the bottom of the pastry with a fork to keep it from rising. Return to oven for 2 – 3 minutes.

 When the shell is done, unmold it and slip it onto a rack. Circulation of air around it while it cools will prevent it from getting soggy.

 Filling the tart:

 Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

 Spread the cooked onions in the pastry shell. Arrange anchovy filets over it in a fan-shaped design. Place the olives at decorative intervals. Drizzle on the oil. Bake in upper third of the preheated over for 10 to 15 minutes, or until bubbling hot.

 Bon Appetit as Julia would always say!

Recipe adapted from Julia Child’s, Mastering the Art of French Cooking

 

 

Posted: 9-24-2012

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Pissaladiere Nicoise:  Onion Tart with Anchovies and Black Olives

 Recipe adapted from Mastering the Art of French Cooking by Julia Child

This is not a quiche, properly speaking it contains no eggs. In Nice, France it is made either in a pastry shell or on a flat round of bread dough like the Italian pizza.

 For 4 to 6 servings

 Ingredients:

2 lbs. minced onions

4 Tb olive oil

4 parsley sprigs

¼ tsp thyme

½ bay leaf, crumbled

2 cloves unpeeled garlic

½ tsp salt

1 pinch of powdered cloves

1/8 tsp pepper

8 canned anchovy filets

16 pitted black olives (the dry Mediterranean type)

1 Tb olive oil

 Cook the onions very slowly in the olive oil with the herbs, garlic, and salt for 1 hour, or until very tender. Discard herb bouquet and garlic. Stir in cloves and pepper, and taste carefully for seasoning.

 For an 8-inch partially cooked pastry shell on a baking sheet:

 2 cups all-purpose flour

1 tsp salt

½ tsp sugar

6 ounces (1 ½ sticks) chilled butter cut into ½ -inch bits

4 Tb chilled shortening

A scant half-cup of iced water, plus droplets more as needed

 Place flour, salt, sugar, butter, and vegetable shortening in a big mixing bowl. Rub the flour and fat together rapidly between the tips of your fingers until the fat is broken into pieces the size of oatmeal flakes. Do not overdo this step, as the fat will be blended more thoroughly later.

 Add the water and blend quickly with one hand, fingers held together and slightly cupped, as you rapidly gather the dough into a mass. Sprinkle up to 1 tablespoon more water by droplets over any unmassed remains and add them tot the main body of the dough. Then press the dough firmly into a roughly shaped ball. It should just hold together and be pliable, but not sticky.

 The fraissage:

 Place the dough on a lightly floured pastry board. With the heel of one hand, not the palm which is too warm, rapidly press the pastry by two-spoonfuls bits down on the board and away from you in a firm, quick smear of about 6 inches. This constitutes the final blending of fat and flour, or fraisage. With a scraper or spatula, gather the dough again into a mass; knead it briefly into a fairly smooth round ball. Sprinkle it lightly with flour and wrap it in waxed paper. Either place the dough in the freezing compartment of the refrigerator for about 1 hour until it is firm but not congealed, or refrigerate for 2 hours or overnight.

 Rolling out the dough:

 Roll out the dough as quickly as possible, so that it will not soften and become difficult to handle.

Place the dough on a lightly floured board or marble. If the dough is hard, beat it with the rolling pin to soften it. Then knead it briefly into a fairly flat circle. It should be just malleable enough to roll out without cracking.

 Lightly flour the top of the dough. Place rolling pin across center and roll the pin back and forth with firm but gentle pressure to start the dough moving. Then with a firm, even stroke, and always rolling away from you, start just below the center of the dough and roll to within an inch of the far edge.

 In this way, roll the dough into a circle 1/8 inch thick and about 2 inches larger all around thena your pie pan or flan ring. The dough should be used as soon as it has been rolled out, so that it will not soften.

Making a pastry shell:

 Once you have rolled the dough over the rolling pin, quickly unroll it over, either the cake pan or flan ring set on a baking sheet you are using. Press the dough lightly into the bottom of the cake pan, or onto the baking sheet if you are using a flan ring. Then lift the edges of the dough and work it gently down the inside edges of mold with your fingers, taking in about 3/8 inch of dough all around the circumference. Trim off excess dough by rolling the pin over the top of the mold.

With your thumbs, push the dough 1/8 inch above the edge of the mold, to make an even, rounded rim of dough all around the inside circumference of the mold. Press a decorative edge around the rim of the pastry with the dull edge of a knife.

 Prick bottom of pastry with a fork at 1/2–inch intervals. To keep the sides of the pastry shell from collapsing and the bottom from puffing up, either butter the bottom of another mold or lightweight foil. Weigh the foil or mold with a handful of dry beans and place it inside of the pastry. This will hold the sides of the pastry against the mold while the shell is baking.

Set the oven temperature to 400-degrees. Bake the shell at the middle level of a preheated 400-degree oven for 8 – 9 minutes until pastry is set. Remove mold or foil and beans. Prick the bottom of the pastry with a fork to keep it from rising. Return to oven for 2 – 3 minutes.

 When the shell is done, unmold it and slip it onto a rack. Circulation of air around it while it cools will prevent it from getting soggy.

 Filling the tart:

 Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

 Spread the cooked onions in the pastry shell. Arrange anchovy filets over it in a fan-shaped design. Place the olives at decorative intervals. Drizzle on the oil. Bake in upper third of the preheated over for 10 to 15 minutes, or until bubbling hot.

 Bon Appetit as Julia would always say!

Recipe adapted from Julia Child’s, Mastering the Art of French Cooking

 

 

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Pissaladiere Nicoise:  Onion Tart with Anchovies and Black Olives

 Recipe adapted from Mastering the Art of French Cooking by Julia Child

This is not a quiche, properly speaking it contains no eggs. In Nice, France it is made either in a pastry shell or on a flat round of bread dough like the Italian pizza.

 For 4 to 6 servings

 Ingredients:

2 lbs. minced onions

4 Tb olive oil

4 parsley sprigs

¼ tsp thyme

½ bay leaf, crumbled

2 cloves unpeeled garlic

½ tsp salt

1 pinch of powdered cloves

1/8 tsp pepper

8 canned anchovy filets

16 pitted black olives (the dry Mediterranean type)

1 Tb olive oil

 Cook the onions very slowly in the olive oil with the herbs, garlic, and salt for 1 hour, or until very tender. Discard herb bouquet and garlic. Stir in cloves and pepper, and taste carefully for seasoning.

 For an 8-inch partially cooked pastry shell on a baking sheet:

 2 cups all-purpose flour

1 tsp salt

½ tsp sugar

6 ounces (1 ½ sticks) chilled butter cut into ½ -inch bits

4 Tb chilled shortening

A scant half-cup of iced water, plus droplets more as needed

 Place flour, salt, sugar, butter, and vegetable shortening in a big mixing bowl. Rub the flour and fat together rapidly between the tips of your fingers until the fat is broken into pieces the size of oatmeal flakes. Do not overdo this step, as the fat will be blended more thoroughly later.

 Add the water and blend quickly with one hand, fingers held together and slightly cupped, as you rapidly gather the dough into a mass. Sprinkle up to 1 tablespoon more water by droplets over any unmassed remains and add them tot the main body of the dough. Then press the dough firmly into a roughly shaped ball. It should just hold together and be pliable, but not sticky.

 The fraissage:

 Place the dough on a lightly floured pastry board. With the heel of one hand, not the palm which is too warm, rapidly press the pastry by two-spoonfuls bits down on the board and away from you in a firm, quick smear of about 6 inches. This constitutes the final blending of fat and flour, or fraisage. With a scraper or spatula, gather the dough again into a mass; knead it briefly into a fairly smooth round ball. Sprinkle it lightly with flour and wrap it in waxed paper. Either place the dough in the freezing compartment of the refrigerator for about 1 hour until it is firm but not congealed, or refrigerate for 2 hours or overnight.

 Rolling out the dough:

 Roll out the dough as quickly as possible, so that it will not soften and become difficult to handle.

Place the dough on a lightly floured board or marble. If the dough is hard, beat it with the rolling pin to soften it. Then knead it briefly into a fairly flat circle. It should be just malleable enough to roll out without cracking.

 Lightly flour the top of the dough. Place rolling pin across center and roll the pin back and forth with firm but gentle pressure to start the dough moving. Then with a firm, even stroke, and always rolling away from you, start just below the center of the dough and roll to within an inch of the far edge.

 In this way, roll the dough into a circle 1/8 inch thick and about 2 inches larger all around thena your pie pan or flan ring. The dough should be used as soon as it has been rolled out, so that it will not soften.

Making a pastry shell:

 Once you have rolled the dough over the rolling pin, quickly unroll it over, either the cake pan or flan ring set on a baking sheet you are using. Press the dough lightly into the bottom of the cake pan, or onto the baking sheet if you are using a flan ring. Then lift the edges of the dough and work it gently down the inside edges of mold with your fingers, taking in about 3/8 inch of dough all around the circumference. Trim off excess dough by rolling the pin over the top of the mold.

With your thumbs, push the dough 1/8 inch above the edge of the mold, to make an even, rounded rim of dough all around the inside circumference of the mold. Press a decorative edge around the rim of the pastry with the dull edge of a knife.

 Prick bottom of pastry with a fork at 1/2–inch intervals. To keep the sides of the pastry shell from collapsing and the bottom from puffing up, either butter the bottom of another mold or lightweight foil. Weigh the foil or mold with a handful of dry beans and place it inside of the pastry. This will hold the sides of the pastry against the mold while the shell is baking.

Set the oven temperature to 400-degrees. Bake the shell at the middle level of a preheated 400-degree oven for 8 – 9 minutes until pastry is set. Remove mold or foil and beans. Prick the bottom of the pastry with a fork to keep it from rising. Return to oven for 2 – 3 minutes.

 When the shell is done, unmold it and slip it onto a rack. Circulation of air around it while it cools will prevent it from getting soggy.

 Filling the tart:

 Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

 Spread the cooked onions in the pastry shell. Arrange anchovy filets over it in a fan-shaped design. Place the olives at decorative intervals. Drizzle on the oil. Bake in upper third of the preheated over for 10 to 15 minutes, or until bubbling hot.

 Bon Appetit as Julia would always say!

Recipe adapted from Julia Child’s, Mastering the Art of French Cooking

 

 

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Pissaladiere Nicoise:  Onion Tart with Anchovies and Black Olives

 Recipe adapted from Mastering the Art of French Cooking by Julia Child

This is not a quiche, properly speaking it contains no eggs. In Nice, France it is made either in a pastry shell or on a flat round of bread dough like the Italian pizza.

 For 4 to 6 servings

 Ingredients:

2 lbs. minced onions

4 Tb olive oil

4 parsley sprigs

¼ tsp thyme

½ bay leaf, crumbled

2 cloves unpeeled garlic

½ tsp salt

1 pinch of powdered cloves

1/8 tsp pepper

8 canned anchovy filets

16 pitted black olives (the dry Mediterranean type)

1 Tb olive oil

 Cook the onions very slowly in the olive oil with the herbs, garlic, and salt for 1 hour, or until very tender. Discard herb bouquet and garlic. Stir in cloves and pepper, and taste carefully for seasoning.

 For an 8-inch partially cooked pastry shell on a baking sheet:

 2 cups all-purpose flour

1 tsp salt

½ tsp sugar

6 ounces (1 ½ sticks) chilled butter cut into ½ -inch bits

4 Tb chilled shortening

A scant half-cup of iced water, plus droplets more as needed

 Place flour, salt, sugar, butter, and vegetable shortening in a big mixing bowl. Rub the flour and fat together rapidly between the tips of your fingers until the fat is broken into pieces the size of oatmeal flakes. Do not overdo this step, as the fat will be blended more thoroughly later.

 Add the water and blend quickly with one hand, fingers held together and slightly cupped, as you rapidly gather the dough into a mass. Sprinkle up to 1 tablespoon more water by droplets over any unmassed remains and add them tot the main body of the dough. Then press the dough firmly into a roughly shaped ball. It should just hold together and be pliable, but not sticky.

 The fraissage:

 Place the dough on a lightly floured pastry board. With the heel of one hand, not the palm which is too warm, rapidly press the pastry by two-spoonfuls bits down on the board and away from you in a firm, quick smear of about 6 inches. This constitutes the final blending of fat and flour, or fraisage. With a scraper or spatula, gather the dough again into a mass; knead it briefly into a fairly smooth round ball. Sprinkle it lightly with flour and wrap it in waxed paper. Either place the dough in the freezing compartment of the refrigerator for about 1 hour until it is firm but not congealed, or refrigerate for 2 hours or overnight.

 Rolling out the dough:

 Roll out the dough as quickly as possible, so that it will not soften and become difficult to handle.

Place the dough on a lightly floured board or marble. If the dough is hard, beat it with the rolling pin to soften it. Then knead it briefly into a fairly flat circle. It should be just malleable enough to roll out without cracking.

 Lightly flour the top of the dough. Place rolling pin across center and roll the pin back and forth with firm but gentle pressure to start the dough moving. Then with a firm, even stroke, and always rolling away from you, start just below the center of the dough and roll to within an inch of the far edge.

 In this way, roll the dough into a circle 1/8 inch thick and about 2 inches larger all around thena your pie pan or flan ring. The dough should be used as soon as it has been rolled out, so that it will not soften.

Making a pastry shell:

 Once you have rolled the dough over the rolling pin, quickly unroll it over, either the cake pan or flan ring set on a baking sheet you are using. Press the dough lightly into the bottom of the cake pan, or onto the baking sheet if you are using a flan ring. Then lift the edges of the dough and work it gently down the inside edges of mold with your fingers, taking in about 3/8 inch of dough all around the circumference. Trim off excess dough by rolling the pin over the top of the mold.

With your thumbs, push the dough 1/8 inch above the edge of the mold, to make an even, rounded rim of dough all around the inside circumference of the mold. Press a decorative edge around the rim of the pastry with the dull edge of a knife.

 Prick bottom of pastry with a fork at 1/2–inch intervals. To keep the sides of the pastry shell from collapsing and the bottom from puffing up, either butter the bottom of another mold or lightweight foil. Weigh the foil or mold with a handful of dry beans and place it inside of the pastry. This will hold the sides of the pastry against the mold while the shell is baking.

Set the oven temperature to 400-degrees. Bake the shell at the middle level of a preheated 400-degree oven for 8 – 9 minutes until pastry is set. Remove mold or foil and beans. Prick the bottom of the pastry with a fork to keep it from rising. Return to oven for 2 – 3 minutes.

 When the shell is done, unmold it and slip it onto a rack. Circulation of air around it while it cools will prevent it from getting soggy.

 Filling the tart:

 Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

 Spread the cooked onions in the pastry shell. Arrange anchovy filets over it in a fan-shaped design. Place the olives at decorative intervals. Drizzle on the oil. Bake in upper third of the preheated over for 10 to 15 minutes, or until bubbling hot.

 Bon Appetit as Julia would always say!

Recipe adapted from Julia Child’s, Mastering the Art of French Cooking

 

 

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4 Responses to “Onion Tart with Anchovies & Black Olives- Recipe for Pissaladiere Nicoise”

  1. chris junkins says:

    bronwyn:
    this looks just delicious even though it’s only 8 in the morning…

  2. […] Did Julia Child have a recipe for this quintessential Provencal recipe, she did– called Pissaladiere Nicoise.  It had been twenty or more years since I’d made an onion tart, but Julia did not […]

  3. Pete McCracken says:

    Gee, a direct quotation from Julia Childs “Mastering the Art of French Cooking”, page 141, and not even a brief citation!

    • Bronwyn says:

      Hi Pete,
      I’m sorry you didn’t see the information that cites Julia Child’s “Mastering The Art of French Cooking” for the Pate Brisee recipe included in the post on making an onion tart. I make a point of including source information for all my recipes, but, you make me think I should also include the page number as well. Many thanks for your comment!
      Bronwyn

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