A culinary online center dedicated to promoting the importance and the joy of American home cooking with an emphasis on local products and talent, celebrating the unique spirit and energy of the new food world ethos, especially in Vermont.

amuse bouche

I love quotes that add meaning to my life. Here are a few to live by:

How should I eat? (Not too much)
—Michael Pollan

If it is so difficult to learn to cook, how did all those early pioneer women manage to cross the country in rugged covered wagons and feed troops of people from one big pot hung over an open fire?
—Marion Cunningham, from Learning to Cook

Treat treats as treats.
—Michael Pollan

No matter how you slice it through, grain-fed meat production systems are a drain on the global food supply.
—Jonathan A. Foley, director of the Institute on the Environment, U of MN

Potato Salad Two Ways

Homepage potatoes

Last week I published an article written by Gary Harrison, a friend and an expert on international agriculture and development. His experience in Lima, Peru working for The International Potato Center, has made him really knowledgeable about potatoes, all 4,000 plus varieties! His story about “chuno”, an ancient process of preserving potatoes, is definitely of interest today as we look for ways to feed future generations, and do it organically.

This week’s potato post is a bit more lighthearted, with two recipes for potato salad and a new video shot by my friend, Janet Biehl, late last summer showing two ways to make potato salad. My stepmother, Judith Jones, and I celebrate the differences between the French method and the American. If you’re thinking of a side dish to go with the roast lamb, ham or prime rib you’re serving for Easter dinner, one of these classic salad recipes may be just the thing!

Grey Line 

POMMES DE TERRE A L’HUILE
French Potato Salad
from Mastering the Art of French Cooking by Julia Child 

For about six cups

2 lbs. “boiling” potatoes (8 to 10 medium potatoes)
A 3-quart mixing bowl

Scrub the potatoes. Drop them in boiling salted water to cover, and boil until the potatoes are just tender when pierced with a small knife. Drain. As soon as they are cool enough to handle, peel and cut them into slices about 1/8 inch thick. Place them in the mixing bowl.

4 Tb dry white wine or 2 Tb dry white vermouth and 2 Tb stock or canned bouillon
2 Tb  wine vinegar  or 1 Tb lemon juice
1 tsp prepared mustard
ÂĽ tsp salt
a small bowl and wire whip
6 Tb olive oil
Pepper
Optional: 1 to 2 Tb minced shallots or green onions

Pour the wine or vermouth and stock or bouillon over the warm potato slices and toss very gently. Set aside for a few minutes until the potatoes have absorbed the liquids. 

Beat the vinegar or vinegar and lemon juice, mustard, and salt in the small bowl until the salt has dissolved. Then beat in the oil by droplets. Season to taste, and stir in the optional shallots or onions. Pour the dressing over the potatoes and toss gently to blend.

2 to 3 Tb chopped mixed green herbs or parsley

Serve them while still warm, or chill. Decorate with herbs before serving.  

Grey Line

MY GRANDMOTHER’S POTATO SALAD
A Very Midwestern American Potato Salad
By Bronwyn Jones Dunne 

Serves 4-6 people

6 large boiling potatoes
4 large eggs
1 medium cucumber
1/2 large white onion
Kosher Salt to taste
Freshly ground pepper
1 – 1 ½ cups mayonnaise (I always use Hellman’s)
6 radishes, cleaned and trimmed
2 Tb chopped chives or parsley 

Boil the potatoes and eggs together (taking the eggs out after 4 minutes and the potatoes after they are soft enough to be pierced with a knife but not so soft that they begin to break apart), or boil in separate pans. 

Drain and begin to peel as soon as you can handle them. Cube the potatoes and eggs and place in a bowl. Wash the cucumber. Slice off the top and bottom and cube the cucumber adding it to the potatoes and eggs in the bowl.  Peel and trim the onion. Slice in half and cube half the onion. Add the cubed onion to the bowl. 

Sprinkle the kosher salt and grind the pepper over the vegetables in the bowl. Add the mayonnaise and turn it into the potato mixture making sure that all the vegetables are covered with a thick coating of the mayonnaise. Potatoes soak up a lot of liquid so make sure you have enough mayonnaise. Tasting, at this point, is the only way to be sure you have the right amount of seasonings

Wash and trim the radishes, slicing off the top and bottoms and cutting into all four sides to form “petals”. Set aside covered with cold water. Wash and finely chop the chives or parsley. Set aside for the final presentation.

If you are going to serve the potato salad at the table, choose a decorative bowl and spoon the salad into the bowl. Sprinkle the chopped parsley or chives over the salad. Place the radish “rosettes” on top of the vegetable and mayonnaise mixture. (You may also want to decorate with washed and trimmed lettuce leaves around the edge of the salad.) 

Grey Line

Click here to watch a new video shot by my friend, Janet Biehl, late last summer of Judith and I demonstrating these two potato salad recipes.

A Bientot,

Posted: 3-23-2013

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Homepage potatoes

Last week I published an article written by Gary Harrison, a friend and an expert on international agriculture and development. His experience in Lima, Peru working for The International Potato Center, has made him really knowledgeable about potatoes, all 4,000 plus varieties! His story about “chuno”, an ancient process of preserving potatoes, is definitely of interest today as we look for ways to feed future generations, and do it organically.

This week’s potato post is a bit more lighthearted, with two recipes for potato salad and a new video shot by my friend, Janet Biehl, late last summer showing two ways to make potato salad. My stepmother, Judith Jones, and I celebrate the differences between the French method and the American. If you’re thinking of a side dish to go with the roast lamb, ham or prime rib you're serving for Easter dinner, one of these classic salad recipes may be just the thing!

Grey Line 

POMMES DE TERRE A L'HUILE
French Potato Salad
from Mastering the Art of French Cooking by Julia Child 

For about six cups

2 lbs. “boiling” potatoes (8 to 10 medium potatoes)
A 3-quart mixing bowl

Scrub the potatoes. Drop them in boiling salted water to cover, and boil until the potatoes are just tender when pierced with a small knife. Drain. As soon as they are cool enough to handle, peel and cut them into slices about 1/8 inch thick. Place them in the mixing bowl.

4 Tb dry white wine or 2 Tb dry white vermouth and 2 Tb stock or canned bouillon
2 Tb  wine vinegar  or 1 Tb lemon juice
1 tsp prepared mustard
ÂĽ tsp salt
a small bowl and wire whip
6 Tb olive oil
Pepper
Optional: 1 to 2 Tb minced shallots or green onions

Pour the wine or vermouth and stock or bouillon over the warm potato slices and toss very gently. Set aside for a few minutes until the potatoes have absorbed the liquids. 

Beat the vinegar or vinegar and lemon juice, mustard, and salt in the small bowl until the salt has dissolved. Then beat in the oil by droplets. Season to taste, and stir in the optional shallots or onions. Pour the dressing over the potatoes and toss gently to blend.

2 to 3 Tb chopped mixed green herbs or parsley

Serve them while still warm, or chill. Decorate with herbs before serving.  

Grey Line

MY GRANDMOTHER'S POTATO SALAD
A Very Midwestern American Potato Salad
By Bronwyn Jones Dunne 

Serves 4-6 people

6 large boiling potatoes
4 large eggs
1 medium cucumber
1/2 large white onion
Kosher Salt to taste
Freshly ground pepper
1 – 1 ½ cups mayonnaise (I always use Hellman’s)
6 radishes, cleaned and trimmed
2 Tb chopped chives or parsley 

Boil the potatoes and eggs together (taking the eggs out after 4 minutes and the potatoes after they are soft enough to be pierced with a knife but not so soft that they begin to break apart), or boil in separate pans. 

Drain and begin to peel as soon as you can handle them. Cube the potatoes and eggs and place in a bowl. Wash the cucumber. Slice off the top and bottom and cube the cucumber adding it to the potatoes and eggs in the bowl.  Peel and trim the onion. Slice in half and cube half the onion. Add the cubed onion to the bowl. 

Sprinkle the kosher salt and grind the pepper over the vegetables in the bowl. Add the mayonnaise and turn it into the potato mixture making sure that all the vegetables are covered with a thick coating of the mayonnaise. Potatoes soak up a lot of liquid so make sure you have enough mayonnaise. Tasting, at this point, is the only way to be sure you have the right amount of seasonings

Wash and trim the radishes, slicing off the top and bottoms and cutting into all four sides to form “petals”. Set aside covered with cold water. Wash and finely chop the chives or parsley. Set aside for the final presentation.

If you are going to serve the potato salad at the table, choose a decorative bowl and spoon the salad into the bowl. Sprinkle the chopped parsley or chives over the salad. Place the radish “rosettes” on top of the vegetable and mayonnaise mixture. (You may also want to decorate with washed and trimmed lettuce leaves around the edge of the salad.) 

Grey Line

Click here to watch a new video shot by my friend, Janet Biehl, late last summer of Judith and I demonstrating these two potato salad recipes.

A Bientot,

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Homepage potatoes

Last week I published an article written by Gary Harrison, a friend and an expert on international agriculture and development. His experience in Lima, Peru working for The International Potato Center, has made him really knowledgeable about potatoes, all 4,000 plus varieties! His story about “chuno”, an ancient process of preserving potatoes, is definitely of interest today as we look for ways to feed future generations, and do it organically.

This week’s potato post is a bit more lighthearted, with two recipes for potato salad and a new video shot by my friend, Janet Biehl, late last summer showing two ways to make potato salad. My stepmother, Judith Jones, and I celebrate the differences between the French method and the American. If you’re thinking of a side dish to go with the roast lamb, ham or prime rib you're serving for Easter dinner, one of these classic salad recipes may be just the thing!

Grey Line 

POMMES DE TERRE A L'HUILE
French Potato Salad
from Mastering the Art of French Cooking by Julia Child 

For about six cups

2 lbs. “boiling” potatoes (8 to 10 medium potatoes)
A 3-quart mixing bowl

Scrub the potatoes. Drop them in boiling salted water to cover, and boil until the potatoes are just tender when pierced with a small knife. Drain. As soon as they are cool enough to handle, peel and cut them into slices about 1/8 inch thick. Place them in the mixing bowl.

4 Tb dry white wine or 2 Tb dry white vermouth and 2 Tb stock or canned bouillon
2 Tb  wine vinegar  or 1 Tb lemon juice
1 tsp prepared mustard
ÂĽ tsp salt
a small bowl and wire whip
6 Tb olive oil
Pepper
Optional: 1 to 2 Tb minced shallots or green onions

Pour the wine or vermouth and stock or bouillon over the warm potato slices and toss very gently. Set aside for a few minutes until the potatoes have absorbed the liquids. 

Beat the vinegar or vinegar and lemon juice, mustard, and salt in the small bowl until the salt has dissolved. Then beat in the oil by droplets. Season to taste, and stir in the optional shallots or onions. Pour the dressing over the potatoes and toss gently to blend.

2 to 3 Tb chopped mixed green herbs or parsley

Serve them while still warm, or chill. Decorate with herbs before serving.  

Grey Line

MY GRANDMOTHER'S POTATO SALAD
A Very Midwestern American Potato Salad
By Bronwyn Jones Dunne 

Serves 4-6 people

6 large boiling potatoes
4 large eggs
1 medium cucumber
1/2 large white onion
Kosher Salt to taste
Freshly ground pepper
1 – 1 ½ cups mayonnaise (I always use Hellman’s)
6 radishes, cleaned and trimmed
2 Tb chopped chives or parsley 

Boil the potatoes and eggs together (taking the eggs out after 4 minutes and the potatoes after they are soft enough to be pierced with a knife but not so soft that they begin to break apart), or boil in separate pans. 

Drain and begin to peel as soon as you can handle them. Cube the potatoes and eggs and place in a bowl. Wash the cucumber. Slice off the top and bottom and cube the cucumber adding it to the potatoes and eggs in the bowl.  Peel and trim the onion. Slice in half and cube half the onion. Add the cubed onion to the bowl. 

Sprinkle the kosher salt and grind the pepper over the vegetables in the bowl. Add the mayonnaise and turn it into the potato mixture making sure that all the vegetables are covered with a thick coating of the mayonnaise. Potatoes soak up a lot of liquid so make sure you have enough mayonnaise. Tasting, at this point, is the only way to be sure you have the right amount of seasonings

Wash and trim the radishes, slicing off the top and bottoms and cutting into all four sides to form “petals”. Set aside covered with cold water. Wash and finely chop the chives or parsley. Set aside for the final presentation.

If you are going to serve the potato salad at the table, choose a decorative bowl and spoon the salad into the bowl. Sprinkle the chopped parsley or chives over the salad. Place the radish “rosettes” on top of the vegetable and mayonnaise mixture. (You may also want to decorate with washed and trimmed lettuce leaves around the edge of the salad.) 

Grey Line

Click here to watch a new video shot by my friend, Janet Biehl, late last summer of Judith and I demonstrating these two potato salad recipes.

A Bientot,

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Homepage potatoes

Last week I published an article written by Gary Harrison, a friend and an expert on international agriculture and development. His experience in Lima, Peru working for The International Potato Center, has made him really knowledgeable about potatoes, all 4,000 plus varieties! His story about “chuno”, an ancient process of preserving potatoes, is definitely of interest today as we look for ways to feed future generations, and do it organically.

This week’s potato post is a bit more lighthearted, with two recipes for potato salad and a new video shot by my friend, Janet Biehl, late last summer showing two ways to make potato salad. My stepmother, Judith Jones, and I celebrate the differences between the French method and the American. If you’re thinking of a side dish to go with the roast lamb, ham or prime rib you're serving for Easter dinner, one of these classic salad recipes may be just the thing!

Grey Line 

POMMES DE TERRE A L'HUILE
French Potato Salad
from Mastering the Art of French Cooking by Julia Child 

For about six cups

2 lbs. “boiling” potatoes (8 to 10 medium potatoes)
A 3-quart mixing bowl

Scrub the potatoes. Drop them in boiling salted water to cover, and boil until the potatoes are just tender when pierced with a small knife. Drain. As soon as they are cool enough to handle, peel and cut them into slices about 1/8 inch thick. Place them in the mixing bowl.

4 Tb dry white wine or 2 Tb dry white vermouth and 2 Tb stock or canned bouillon
2 Tb  wine vinegar  or 1 Tb lemon juice
1 tsp prepared mustard
ÂĽ tsp salt
a small bowl and wire whip
6 Tb olive oil
Pepper
Optional: 1 to 2 Tb minced shallots or green onions

Pour the wine or vermouth and stock or bouillon over the warm potato slices and toss very gently. Set aside for a few minutes until the potatoes have absorbed the liquids. 

Beat the vinegar or vinegar and lemon juice, mustard, and salt in the small bowl until the salt has dissolved. Then beat in the oil by droplets. Season to taste, and stir in the optional shallots or onions. Pour the dressing over the potatoes and toss gently to blend.

2 to 3 Tb chopped mixed green herbs or parsley

Serve them while still warm, or chill. Decorate with herbs before serving.  

Grey Line

MY GRANDMOTHER'S POTATO SALAD
A Very Midwestern American Potato Salad
By Bronwyn Jones Dunne 

Serves 4-6 people

6 large boiling potatoes
4 large eggs
1 medium cucumber
1/2 large white onion
Kosher Salt to taste
Freshly ground pepper
1 – 1 ½ cups mayonnaise (I always use Hellman’s)
6 radishes, cleaned and trimmed
2 Tb chopped chives or parsley 

Boil the potatoes and eggs together (taking the eggs out after 4 minutes and the potatoes after they are soft enough to be pierced with a knife but not so soft that they begin to break apart), or boil in separate pans. 

Drain and begin to peel as soon as you can handle them. Cube the potatoes and eggs and place in a bowl. Wash the cucumber. Slice off the top and bottom and cube the cucumber adding it to the potatoes and eggs in the bowl.  Peel and trim the onion. Slice in half and cube half the onion. Add the cubed onion to the bowl. 

Sprinkle the kosher salt and grind the pepper over the vegetables in the bowl. Add the mayonnaise and turn it into the potato mixture making sure that all the vegetables are covered with a thick coating of the mayonnaise. Potatoes soak up a lot of liquid so make sure you have enough mayonnaise. Tasting, at this point, is the only way to be sure you have the right amount of seasonings

Wash and trim the radishes, slicing off the top and bottoms and cutting into all four sides to form “petals”. Set aside covered with cold water. Wash and finely chop the chives or parsley. Set aside for the final presentation.

If you are going to serve the potato salad at the table, choose a decorative bowl and spoon the salad into the bowl. Sprinkle the chopped parsley or chives over the salad. Place the radish “rosettes” on top of the vegetable and mayonnaise mixture. (You may also want to decorate with washed and trimmed lettuce leaves around the edge of the salad.) 

Grey Line

Click here to watch a new video shot by my friend, Janet Biehl, late last summer of Judith and I demonstrating these two potato salad recipes.

A Bientot,

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3 Responses to “Potato Salad Two Ways”

  1. Wonderful, Bronwyn! Who doesn’t love potato salad? I shall try both of these. I agree, Hellman’s is the go to mayo for me too (unless making homemade.)

    Last night I did a Vietnamese nuoc sauce over rice noodles, salad and fresh filet of grouper on top. Fresh mint is a must with Vietnamese food! I wonder if you’re thinking of including any Asian style recipes? These days I find myself drawn more and more to Asian cooking. And Vietnamese cuisine has the wonderful French influence!

    Just a thought.
    Your fan,
    Carole Bugge
    aka C.E. Lawrence

  2. Warren says:

    Maaaaaaaaan Thats awesome

  3. […] Bronwyn Dunne and Judith Jones Prepare Two Potato Salads at Bryn Teg. See the recipes […]

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