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amuse bouche

I love quotes that add meaning to my life. Here are a few to live by:

Approach love and cooking with reckless abandon.
—The Dalai Lama

Rhubarb is a metaphor for finding happiness in your own backyard.
—Garrison Keillor

Buy your snacks from a farmers’ market.
—Michael Pollan

Even when he had a garden in Paris, Thomas Jefferson cultivated Indian corn, “to eat green in our manner, …as quickly after it left the stalk as possible.
—Evan Jones, from American Food

Strong Hands + Patience: Recipes for Home Fermenting

**Update! You know what you could do with this?  Make Szegediner Gulasch (German Sauerkraut Beef Gulash) – it’s a tad on the spicy side, but very very tasty!  I served mine over roasted potatoes and topped with sour cream. YUM!

Don’t be intimidated by home fermenting, it is surprisingly and refreshingly simple.  I’m no expert, but I have successfully produced kombucha (shoot me a note if you’re local and would like a scoby mother to start your own kombucha), apple cider vinegar (I also have a vinegar mother if you’re interested), and most recently, sauerkraut.  Fermented foods are nutritious and delicious – what’s not to love?!

Health benefits of fermented foods:

The microbial world inside our bodies, referred to as our microbiome, is credited/blamed for our digestion/struggle to digest, moods, satiety/cravings, immune system, etc.  You can see why it’s important to ensure your microbiome is well cared for.  The probiotics found in fermented foods support the proliferation of the healthy bacteria in our microbiomes.

Interested in knowing more? Read: It Starts with Food by Dallas and Melissa Hartwig or Grain Brain by David Perlmutter.  Listen: “Paleo Magazine Radio #247” Watch or listen: “Joe Rogan Experience #1054

Things to know about home fermenting:

  • Watch out for mold and visible fuzz – mold is bad.  Use fermentation weights (a glass jar filled with water also works) to keep solids under the water.  Fermenting is an anaerobic process, and air facilitates mold growth.
  • Don’t fret if it gets a white film – it’s a natural yeast byproduct of the ferment.  Simply spoon it off the top and you’re good to go.
  • Strong smell is OK and expected – don’t worry, the unpleasant and pungent stink will inform you if a batch goes bad.
  • Vegetables should maintain vibrancy – it is a sign of spoiled vegetables if they get slimy, brown, and discolored.
  • Fermentation duration varies depending on temperature – the colder it is, the longer it will take.

Top view of fermentation weights holding the kraut under the liquid.

Make your own kraut:

What you’ll need:

  • 1 Large/2 small heads of red or green cabbage
  • 2 Tbsp sea salt
  • Fermenting vessel; either a Large glass jar with a lid (ask your local bartender to save you a giant olive jar) or use a fermentation crock (I use this one)
  • Fermentation weights (you can use a glass jar filled with water – be sure it fits through the top of your fermentation vessel)
  • Optional extras: caraway, apple, carrot, onion, and/or garlic

Thinly slice the cabbage and optional add-ins.  I like to do this with the slicing blade of my food processor.  Put shredded cabbage into a large bowl with the sea salt.  Depending on how much you make, you may need to do this in batches.

Pre and post mashed cabbage. Be patient, it takes time and strong hands to break the cabbage down.

Mash the cabbage for ~10 minutes with a potato masher, muddler, or your hands.  I prefer starting with the potato masher to get the process started, then use my hands – it’s a serious finger exercise.  The cabbage will break down and release water.  If there is not enough cabbage water to fully cover your cabbage, top with filtered water until it is all covered.

Weigh down cabbage and cover vessel.  If using a fermentation crock, be sure to keep the water lip filled to avoid exposing your ferment to oxygen.  If using a jar, either seal tightly and burp daily to release pressure, or cover with a coffee filter or cloth napkin secured with a rubber band.  Ferment at least two weeks, tasting each week until desired flavor and texture has been reached.

Have your own fermenting success stories, requests, or ideas?  Please share in comments below!

Until next time,

Corrie Austin

Posted: 1-20-2019

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Don't be intimidated by home fermenting, it is surprisingly and refreshingly simple.  I'm no expert, but I have successfully produced kombucha (shoot me a note if you're local and would like a scoby mother to start your own kombucha), apple cider vinegar (I also have a vinegar mother if you're interested), and most recently, sauerkraut.  Fermented foods are nutritious and delicious - what's not to love?!



Health benefits of fermented foods:

The microbial world inside our bodies, referred to as our microbiome, is credited/blamed for our digestion/struggle to digest, moods, satiety/cravings, immune system, etc.  You can see why it's important to ensure your microbiome is well cared for.  The probiotics found in fermented foods support the proliferation of the healthy bacteria in our microbiomes.

Interested in knowing more? Read: It Starts with Food by Dallas and Melissa Hartwig or Grain Brain by David Perlmutter.  Listen: "Paleo Magazine Radio #247" Watch or listen: "Joe Rogan Experience #1054"



Things to know about home fermenting:
  • Watch out for mold and visible fuzz - mold is bad.  Use fermentation weights (a glass jar filled with water also works) to keep solids under the water.  Fermenting is an anaerobic process, and air facilitates mold growth.
  • Don't fret if it gets a white film - it's a natural yeast byproduct of the ferment.  Simply spoon it off the top and you're good to go.
  • Strong smell is OK and expected - don't worry, the unpleasant and pungent stink will inform you if a batch goes bad.
  • Vegetables should maintain vibrancy - it is a sign of spoiled vegetables if they get slimy, brown, and discolored.
  • Fermentation duration varies depending on temperature - the colder it is, the longer it will take.
[caption id="attachment_5039" align="aligncenter" width="520"] Top view of fermentation weights holding the kraut under the liquid.[/caption] Make your own kraut:
What you'll need:
  • 1 Large/2 small heads of red or green cabbage
  • 2 Tbsp sea salt
  • Fermenting vessel; either a Large glass jar with a lid (ask your local bartender to save you a giant olive jar) or use a fermentation crock (I use this one)
  • Fermentation weights (you can use a glass jar filled with water - be sure it fits through the top of your fermentation vessel)
  • Optional extras: caraway, apple, carrot, onion, and/or garlic
Thinly slice the cabbage and optional add-ins.  I like to do this with the slicing blade of my food processor.  Put shredded cabbage into a large bowl with the sea salt.  Depending on how much you make, you may need to do this in batches. [caption id="attachment_5040" align="aligncenter" width="520"] Pre and post mashed cabbage. Be patient, it takes time and strong hands to break the cabbage down.[/caption] Mash the cabbage for ~10 minutes with a potato masher, muddler, or your hands.  I prefer starting with the potato masher to get the process started, then use my hands - it's a serious finger exercise.  The cabbage will break down and release water.  If there is not enough cabbage water to fully cover your cabbage, top with filtered water until it is all covered. Weigh down cabbage and cover vessel.  If using a fermentation crock, be sure to keep the water lip filled to avoid exposing your ferment to oxygen.  If using a jar, either seal tightly and burp daily to release pressure, or cover with a coffee filter or cloth napkin secured with a rubber band.  Ferment at least two weeks, tasting each week until desired flavor and texture has been reached.
Have your own fermenting success stories, requests, or ideas?  Please share in comments below! Until next time, Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(52) "Strong Hands + Patience: Recipes for Home Fermenting" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(49) "strong-hands-patience-recipes-for-home-fermenting" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(221) "https://www.drperlmutter.com/about/grain-brain-by-david-perlmutter/ http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/recipes/three-uses-for-a-bounty-of-apples/ https://magnoliadays.com/szegediner-gulasch-german-sauerkraut-beef-goulash/" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-02-07 08:20:10" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-02-07 12:20:10" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5035" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "4" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#373 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5035) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-01-20 12:30:29" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-01-20 16:30:29" ["post_content"]=> string(6067) "**Update! You know what you could do with this?  Make Szegediner Gulasch (German Sauerkraut Beef Gulash) - it's a tad on the spicy side, but very very tasty!  I served mine over roasted potatoes and topped with sour cream. YUM! Don't be intimidated by home fermenting, it is surprisingly and refreshingly simple.  I'm no expert, but I have successfully produced kombucha (shoot me a note if you're local and would like a scoby mother to start your own kombucha), apple cider vinegar (I also have a vinegar mother if you're interested), and most recently, sauerkraut.  Fermented foods are nutritious and delicious - what's not to love?! Health benefits of fermented foods: The microbial world inside our bodies, referred to as our microbiome, is credited/blamed for our digestion/struggle to digest, moods, satiety/cravings, immune system, etc.  You can see why it's important to ensure your microbiome is well cared for.  The probiotics found in fermented foods support the proliferation of the healthy bacteria in our microbiomes. Interested in knowing more? Read: It Starts with Food by Dallas and Melissa Hartwig or Grain Brain by David Perlmutter.  Listen: "Paleo Magazine Radio #247" Watch or listen: "Joe Rogan Experience #1054" Things to know about home fermenting:
  • Watch out for mold and visible fuzz - mold is bad.  Use fermentation weights (a glass jar filled with water also works) to keep solids under the water.  Fermenting is an anaerobic process, and air facilitates mold growth.
  • Don't fret if it gets a white film - it's a natural yeast byproduct of the ferment.  Simply spoon it off the top and you're good to go.
  • Strong smell is OK and expected - don't worry, the unpleasant and pungent stink will inform you if a batch goes bad.
  • Vegetables should maintain vibrancy - it is a sign of spoiled vegetables if they get slimy, brown, and discolored.
  • Fermentation duration varies depending on temperature - the colder it is, the longer it will take.
[caption id="attachment_5039" align="aligncenter" width="520"] Top view of fermentation weights holding the kraut under the liquid.[/caption] Make your own kraut:
What you'll need:
  • 1 Large/2 small heads of red or green cabbage
  • 2 Tbsp sea salt
  • Fermenting vessel; either a Large glass jar with a lid (ask your local bartender to save you a giant olive jar) or use a fermentation crock (I use this one)
  • Fermentation weights (you can use a glass jar filled with water - be sure it fits through the top of your fermentation vessel)
  • Optional extras: caraway, apple, carrot, onion, and/or garlic
Thinly slice the cabbage and optional add-ins.  I like to do this with the slicing blade of my food processor.  Put shredded cabbage into a large bowl with the sea salt.  Depending on how much you make, you may need to do this in batches. [caption id="attachment_5040" align="aligncenter" width="520"] Pre and post mashed cabbage. Be patient, it takes time and strong hands to break the cabbage down.[/caption] Mash the cabbage for ~10 minutes with a potato masher, muddler, or your hands.  I prefer starting with the potato masher to get the process started, then use my hands - it's a serious finger exercise.  The cabbage will break down and release water.  If there is not enough cabbage water to fully cover your cabbage, top with filtered water until it is all covered. Weigh down cabbage and cover vessel.  If using a fermentation crock, be sure to keep the water lip filled to avoid exposing your ferment to oxygen.  If using a jar, either seal tightly and burp daily to release pressure, or cover with a coffee filter or cloth napkin secured with a rubber band.  Ferment at least two weeks, tasting each week until desired flavor and texture has been reached.
Have your own fermenting success stories, requests, or ideas?  Please share in comments below! Until next time, Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(52) "Strong Hands + Patience: Recipes for Home Fermenting" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(49) "strong-hands-patience-recipes-for-home-fermenting" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(221) "https://www.drperlmutter.com/about/grain-brain-by-david-perlmutter/ http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/recipes/three-uses-for-a-bounty-of-apples/ https://magnoliadays.com/szegediner-gulasch-german-sauerkraut-beef-goulash/" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-02-07 08:20:10" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-02-07 12:20:10" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5035" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "4" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["queried_object"]=> object(WP_Post)#373 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5035) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-01-20 12:30:29" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-01-20 16:30:29" ["post_content"]=> string(6067) "**Update! You know what you could do with this?  Make Szegediner Gulasch (German Sauerkraut Beef Gulash) - it's a tad on the spicy side, but very very tasty!  I served mine over roasted potatoes and topped with sour cream. YUM! Don't be intimidated by home fermenting, it is surprisingly and refreshingly simple.  I'm no expert, but I have successfully produced kombucha (shoot me a note if you're local and would like a scoby mother to start your own kombucha), apple cider vinegar (I also have a vinegar mother if you're interested), and most recently, sauerkraut.  Fermented foods are nutritious and delicious - what's not to love?! Health benefits of fermented foods: The microbial world inside our bodies, referred to as our microbiome, is credited/blamed for our digestion/struggle to digest, moods, satiety/cravings, immune system, etc.  You can see why it's important to ensure your microbiome is well cared for.  The probiotics found in fermented foods support the proliferation of the healthy bacteria in our microbiomes. Interested in knowing more? Read: It Starts with Food by Dallas and Melissa Hartwig or Grain Brain by David Perlmutter.  Listen: "Paleo Magazine Radio #247" Watch or listen: "Joe Rogan Experience #1054" Things to know about home fermenting:
  • Watch out for mold and visible fuzz - mold is bad.  Use fermentation weights (a glass jar filled with water also works) to keep solids under the water.  Fermenting is an anaerobic process, and air facilitates mold growth.
  • Don't fret if it gets a white film - it's a natural yeast byproduct of the ferment.  Simply spoon it off the top and you're good to go.
  • Strong smell is OK and expected - don't worry, the unpleasant and pungent stink will inform you if a batch goes bad.
  • Vegetables should maintain vibrancy - it is a sign of spoiled vegetables if they get slimy, brown, and discolored.
  • Fermentation duration varies depending on temperature - the colder it is, the longer it will take.
[caption id="attachment_5039" align="aligncenter" width="520"] Top view of fermentation weights holding the kraut under the liquid.[/caption] Make your own kraut:
What you'll need:
  • 1 Large/2 small heads of red or green cabbage
  • 2 Tbsp sea salt
  • Fermenting vessel; either a Large glass jar with a lid (ask your local bartender to save you a giant olive jar) or use a fermentation crock (I use this one)
  • Fermentation weights (you can use a glass jar filled with water - be sure it fits through the top of your fermentation vessel)
  • Optional extras: caraway, apple, carrot, onion, and/or garlic
Thinly slice the cabbage and optional add-ins.  I like to do this with the slicing blade of my food processor.  Put shredded cabbage into a large bowl with the sea salt.  Depending on how much you make, you may need to do this in batches. [caption id="attachment_5040" align="aligncenter" width="520"] Pre and post mashed cabbage. Be patient, it takes time and strong hands to break the cabbage down.[/caption] Mash the cabbage for ~10 minutes with a potato masher, muddler, or your hands.  I prefer starting with the potato masher to get the process started, then use my hands - it's a serious finger exercise.  The cabbage will break down and release water.  If there is not enough cabbage water to fully cover your cabbage, top with filtered water until it is all covered. Weigh down cabbage and cover vessel.  If using a fermentation crock, be sure to keep the water lip filled to avoid exposing your ferment to oxygen.  If using a jar, either seal tightly and burp daily to release pressure, or cover with a coffee filter or cloth napkin secured with a rubber band.  Ferment at least two weeks, tasting each week until desired flavor and texture has been reached.
Have your own fermenting success stories, requests, or ideas?  Please share in comments below! Until next time, Corrie Austin" ["post_title"]=> string(52) "Strong Hands + Patience: Recipes for Home Fermenting" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(49) "strong-hands-patience-recipes-for-home-fermenting" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(221) "https://www.drperlmutter.com/about/grain-brain-by-david-perlmutter/ http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/recipes/three-uses-for-a-bounty-of-apples/ https://magnoliadays.com/szegediner-gulasch-german-sauerkraut-beef-goulash/" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-02-07 08:20:10" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-02-07 12:20:10" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(42) "http://inthekitchenwithbronwyn.com/?p=5035" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "4" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["queried_object_id"]=> int(5035) }
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4 responses to “Strong Hands + Patience: Recipes for Home Fermenting”

  1. Patrick Kutkey says:

    Will try this at our new house!

    • Corrie Austin says:

      Can’t wait to hear how it turns out.
      Also, thanks for catching my EMBARRASSING typo…I have since corrected my spelling error!

  2. Kellie says:

    I’m surprised there’s no vinegar or sugar!
    I can’t wait to try it 😊

    • Corrie Austin says:

      I’m pretty sure most conventional pickles and ferments are “flash pickled” with vinegar and not actually aged. The salt helps to preserve the veggies. Some folks get real technical with the vegetable to salt ratio (weighing by the gram, etc), but I found mine worked well with flexible measurements. However, mine fermented for ~6 weeks, so perhaps it would have been faster if I was more calculated.

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