A culinary online center dedicated to promoting the importance and the joy of American home cooking with an emphasis on local products and talent, celebrating the unique spirit and energy of the new food world ethos, especially in Vermont.

amuse bouche

I love quotes that add meaning to my life. Here are a few to live by:

We can dramatically increase global food availability and environmental sustainability by using more of our crops to feed people directly and less to fatten livestock.
—Jonathan A. Foley, director of the Institute on the Environment, U of MN

Don’t eat anything your great-grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food.
—Michael Pollan

Cooking is at once child’s play and adult joy. And cooking done with care is an act of love.
—Craig Claiborne

People who eat according to the rules of a traditional food culture are generally healthier than those of us eating a modern Western diet of processed food.
—Michael Pollan

Tarte aux Pommes – A Holiday Gift to You

Photo collage header

The magic of this lovely apple tart is in its simplicity. Whenever I make it, I think of the millions of French housewives whose lives revolve around the daily meals they put on the table. Tarte aux Pommes must be a favorite dessert for many generations of French families, as well as those of us who love the art of French cooking. Once the crust is made, it’s a simple matter to seal it with a jam-based glaze and then fill it full of firm, flavorful apples, a fruit grown on almost every farm and easily available in farmers’ markets from Paris to Cannes. And, here in the United States, you’ll find apples in every super market  – but, don’t forget to check the firmness and tartness of the apples you choose since our apples almost always travel many hundreds of miles to reach those shelves, and, in the process, lose their flavor. We are lucky here in Vermont to have local apples with remarkable local flavor!

Photographing the Process – See it as a Slideshow
When my stepmother, Judith Jones, decided to make an apple tart on the day after Thanksgiving, I pulled out my camera and shot the process not realizing that the result was a step-by-step look at how the tart is made. 

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A Gift
So here it is, a gift to you for the holidays. I hope the photographs, along with the recipe, will allow you to easily make an apple tart, not just for a celebration dinner, but for your family and your friends, any day of the week–in your own kitchen!

Julia Child’s recipe below from Mastering The Art of French Cooking is the best way to master homemade pie dough. She doesn’t leave anything out and if you follow her instructions, you should have a perfect crust.

TARTE AUX POMMES

PATE BRISEE (THE DOUGH)
from Mastering The Art of French Cooking by Julia Child
For an 8 – 10 inch flan ring or false-bottomed cake pan 
22 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup sugar
6 ounces (1 ½ sticks) chilled butter cut into ½ bits
4 tablespoons chilled shortening
Ice water

Large mixing bowl
A pastry board
Waxed paper

Place the flour, salt, sugar, butter, and vegetable shortening in the mixing bowl. Rub the fat and dry ingredients together rapidly with the tips of your fingers until the fat is broken into bits the size of small oatmeal flakes. Do not overdo this step as the fat will be blended more thoroughly later.

A scant half cup of iced water, plus droplets more as needed. Add the water and blend quickly with one hand, fingers held together and slightly cupped as you rapidly gather the dough into a mass. Sprinkle up to 1 tablespoon more water by droplets over any unmassed remains and add them to the main body of the dough. Then press the dough firmly into a roughly shaped ball. It should just hold together and be pliable but not sticky. 

The frisage (final mixing of flour and butter to finish the dough): Place the dough on a lightly floured pastry board. With the heel of one hand, not the palm that is too warm, rapidly press the pastry by two-spoonful bits down on the board and away from you in a firm quick smear of about 6 inches.

Gather the dough into a loose ball, sprinkle with flour and wrap in wax paper. Either, place the wrapped ball of dough in the freezer for an hour, or in the refrigerator for 2 hours or overnight.

Rolling out the dough:  Because of the high butter content, roll out the dough as quickly as possible. Place the dough on a lightly floured board or marble. If the dough is very hard, beat with the rolling pin to soften it. Knead it into a fairly flat circle. It should be just malleable enough to turn over without cracking.

Lightly flour the top of the dough. Place the rolling pin across center and roll the pin back and forth with firm but gentle pressure to start the dough moving. Then, with a firm, even stroke, and always rolling away from you, start just below the center of the dough and roll to within an inch of the far edge. Lift and turn the dough and roll it out, continuing to lift, turn and roll until it is about ½ inch thick and two inches larger then the pan or flan ring.

Drape the circle of dough over the pan and gently roll the rolling pin out from under the dough and press the dough into the pan. With two fingers, press the dough around the edge of the pan to create a scalloped edge. Don’t be afraid to use as much of the dough as possible to be sure that the edges of the pie crust hold up during the baking process. Carefully cut off the remainder of the dough and trim the edges with a sharp knife. Place the pie pan on a cookie sheet while you prepare the filling and the glaze. 

THE FILLING
Judith Jones’ variation
203 to 4 firm cooking apples
1 teaspoon lemon juice
2 tablespoon granulated sugar
A 2-quart mixing bowl

Peel and slice the apples, place in the bowl and sprinkle the lemon juice and the granulated sugar over the slices while making the apricot glaze. 

 

THE GLAZE
Judith Jones’ variation
Use a good apricot preserves or currant jelly. In the demonstration photos, my stepmother used a gooseberry jam she makes from her own gooseberry bushes in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont. 

28½ cup of jam strained through a sieve
2 tablespoons granulated sugar, and 2 tablespoons extra sugar for sprinkling on the top of the apples
A small saucepan
A wooden spatula or spoon

Stir the strained apricot preserves or currant jelly with the sugar over moderately high heat for 2 to 3 minutes until thick enough to coat a spoon with a light film, and the last drops are sticky as they fall from the spoon. Do not boil beyond this point or the glaze will become brittle when it cools. 

While the glaze is still warm spread it over the interior surface of the pie crust in the pie pan making sure to cover all the dough. 

FINAL PREPARATION:
Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Place the apple slices in overlapping concentric circles around the inside of the pie crust as seen in the photos. Spread the warm preserve glaze over the apples and sprinkle with two tablespoons of granulated sugar,

Bake the tart in the upper third of the oven for about 30 minutes. If you have some leftover preserve glaze, warm it a little to make it easier to handle and spread over the hot apples to make them shine. Serve warm or cold with, if you wish, an accompaniment of heavy cream or whipped cream.

With grateful thanks to Julia Child and Judith Jones.

A Bientot and Happy Holidays,

Posted: 12-22-2012

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Photo collage header

The magic of this lovely apple tart is in its simplicity. Whenever I make it, I think of the millions of French housewives whose lives revolve around the daily meals they put on the table. Tarte aux Pommes must be a favorite dessert for many generations of French families, as well as those of us who love the art of French cooking. Once the crust is made, it’s a simple matter to seal it with a jam-based glaze and then fill it full of firm, flavorful apples, a fruit grown on almost every farm and easily available in farmers' markets from Paris to Cannes. And, here in the United States, you’ll find apples in every super market  - but, don’t forget to check the firmness and tartness of the apples you choose since our apples almost always travel many hundreds of miles to reach those shelves, and, in the process, lose their flavor. We are lucky here in Vermont to have local apples with remarkable local flavor!

Photographing the Process - See it as a Slideshow
When my stepmother, Judith Jones, decided to make an apple tart on the day after Thanksgiving, I pulled out my camera and shot the process not realizing that the result was a step-by-step look at how the tart is made. 

[galleryview id=2 panelWidth=523 panelHeight=351 transitionSpeed=50 transitionInterval=1000]

A Gift
So here it is, a gift to you for the holidays. I hope the photographs, along with the recipe, will allow you to easily make an apple tart, not just for a celebration dinner, but for your family and your friends, any day of the week–in your own kitchen!

Julia Child’s recipe below from Mastering The Art of French Cooking is the best way to master homemade pie dough. She doesn’t leave anything out and if you follow her instructions, you should have a perfect crust.

TARTE AUX POMMES

PATE BRISEE (THE DOUGH)
from Mastering The Art of French Cooking by Julia Child
For an 8 – 10 inch flan ring or false-bottomed cake pan 
22 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup sugar
6 ounces (1 ½ sticks) chilled butter cut into ½ bits
4 tablespoons chilled shortening
Ice water

Large mixing bowl
A pastry board
Waxed paper

Place the flour, salt, sugar, butter, and vegetable shortening in the mixing bowl. Rub the fat and dry ingredients together rapidly with the tips of your fingers until the fat is broken into bits the size of small oatmeal flakes. Do not overdo this step as the fat will be blended more thoroughly later.

A scant half cup of iced water, plus droplets more as needed. Add the water and blend quickly with one hand, fingers held together and slightly cupped as you rapidly gather the dough into a mass. Sprinkle up to 1 tablespoon more water by droplets over any unmassed remains and add them to the main body of the dough. Then press the dough firmly into a roughly shaped ball. It should just hold together and be pliable but not sticky. 

The frisage (final mixing of flour and butter to finish the dough): Place the dough on a lightly floured pastry board. With the heel of one hand, not the palm that is too warm, rapidly press the pastry by two-spoonful bits down on the board and away from you in a firm quick smear of about 6 inches.

Gather the dough into a loose ball, sprinkle with flour and wrap in wax paper. Either, place the wrapped ball of dough in the freezer for an hour, or in the refrigerator for 2 hours or overnight.

Rolling out the dough:  Because of the high butter content, roll out the dough as quickly as possible. Place the dough on a lightly floured board or marble. If the dough is very hard, beat with the rolling pin to soften it. Knead it into a fairly flat circle. It should be just malleable enough to turn over without cracking.

Lightly flour the top of the dough. Place the rolling pin across center and roll the pin back and forth with firm but gentle pressure to start the dough moving. Then, with a firm, even stroke, and always rolling away from you, start just below the center of the dough and roll to within an inch of the far edge. Lift and turn the dough and roll it out, continuing to lift, turn and roll until it is about ½ inch thick and two inches larger then the pan or flan ring.

Drape the circle of dough over the pan and gently roll the rolling pin out from under the dough and press the dough into the pan. With two fingers, press the dough around the edge of the pan to create a scalloped edge. Don’t be afraid to use as much of the dough as possible to be sure that the edges of the pie crust hold up during the baking process. Carefully cut off the remainder of the dough and trim the edges with a sharp knife. Place the pie pan on a cookie sheet while you prepare the filling and the glaze. 

THE FILLING
Judith Jones' variation
203 to 4 firm cooking apples
1 teaspoon lemon juice
2 tablespoon granulated sugar
A 2-quart mixing bowl

Peel and slice the apples, place in the bowl and sprinkle the lemon juice and the granulated sugar over the slices while making the apricot glaze. 

 

THE GLAZE
Judith Jones' variation
Use a good apricot preserves or currant jelly. In the demonstration photos, my stepmother used a gooseberry jam she makes from her own gooseberry bushes in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont. 

28½ cup of jam strained through a sieve
2 tablespoons granulated sugar, and 2 tablespoons extra sugar for sprinkling on the top of the apples
A small saucepan
A wooden spatula or spoon

Stir the strained apricot preserves or currant jelly with the sugar over moderately high heat for 2 to 3 minutes until thick enough to coat a spoon with a light film, and the last drops are sticky as they fall from the spoon. Do not boil beyond this point or the glaze will become brittle when it cools. 

While the glaze is still warm spread it over the interior surface of the pie crust in the pie pan making sure to cover all the dough. 

FINAL PREPARATION:
Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Place the apple slices in overlapping concentric circles around the inside of the pie crust as seen in the photos. Spread the warm preserve glaze over the apples and sprinkle with two tablespoons of granulated sugar,

Bake the tart in the upper third of the oven for about 30 minutes. If you have some leftover preserve glaze, warm it a little to make it easier to handle and spread over the hot apples to make them shine. Serve warm or cold with, if you wish, an accompaniment of heavy cream or whipped cream.

With grateful thanks to Julia Child and Judith Jones.

A Bientot and Happy Holidays,

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Photo collage header

The magic of this lovely apple tart is in its simplicity. Whenever I make it, I think of the millions of French housewives whose lives revolve around the daily meals they put on the table. Tarte aux Pommes must be a favorite dessert for many generations of French families, as well as those of us who love the art of French cooking. Once the crust is made, it’s a simple matter to seal it with a jam-based glaze and then fill it full of firm, flavorful apples, a fruit grown on almost every farm and easily available in farmers' markets from Paris to Cannes. And, here in the United States, you’ll find apples in every super market  - but, don’t forget to check the firmness and tartness of the apples you choose since our apples almost always travel many hundreds of miles to reach those shelves, and, in the process, lose their flavor. We are lucky here in Vermont to have local apples with remarkable local flavor!

Photographing the Process - See it as a Slideshow
When my stepmother, Judith Jones, decided to make an apple tart on the day after Thanksgiving, I pulled out my camera and shot the process not realizing that the result was a step-by-step look at how the tart is made. 

[galleryview id=2 panelWidth=523 panelHeight=351 transitionSpeed=50 transitionInterval=1000]

A Gift
So here it is, a gift to you for the holidays. I hope the photographs, along with the recipe, will allow you to easily make an apple tart, not just for a celebration dinner, but for your family and your friends, any day of the week–in your own kitchen!

Julia Child’s recipe below from Mastering The Art of French Cooking is the best way to master homemade pie dough. She doesn’t leave anything out and if you follow her instructions, you should have a perfect crust.

TARTE AUX POMMES

PATE BRISEE (THE DOUGH)
from Mastering The Art of French Cooking by Julia Child
For an 8 – 10 inch flan ring or false-bottomed cake pan 
22 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup sugar
6 ounces (1 ½ sticks) chilled butter cut into ½ bits
4 tablespoons chilled shortening
Ice water

Large mixing bowl
A pastry board
Waxed paper

Place the flour, salt, sugar, butter, and vegetable shortening in the mixing bowl. Rub the fat and dry ingredients together rapidly with the tips of your fingers until the fat is broken into bits the size of small oatmeal flakes. Do not overdo this step as the fat will be blended more thoroughly later.

A scant half cup of iced water, plus droplets more as needed. Add the water and blend quickly with one hand, fingers held together and slightly cupped as you rapidly gather the dough into a mass. Sprinkle up to 1 tablespoon more water by droplets over any unmassed remains and add them to the main body of the dough. Then press the dough firmly into a roughly shaped ball. It should just hold together and be pliable but not sticky. 

The frisage (final mixing of flour and butter to finish the dough): Place the dough on a lightly floured pastry board. With the heel of one hand, not the palm that is too warm, rapidly press the pastry by two-spoonful bits down on the board and away from you in a firm quick smear of about 6 inches.

Gather the dough into a loose ball, sprinkle with flour and wrap in wax paper. Either, place the wrapped ball of dough in the freezer for an hour, or in the refrigerator for 2 hours or overnight.

Rolling out the dough:  Because of the high butter content, roll out the dough as quickly as possible. Place the dough on a lightly floured board or marble. If the dough is very hard, beat with the rolling pin to soften it. Knead it into a fairly flat circle. It should be just malleable enough to turn over without cracking.

Lightly flour the top of the dough. Place the rolling pin across center and roll the pin back and forth with firm but gentle pressure to start the dough moving. Then, with a firm, even stroke, and always rolling away from you, start just below the center of the dough and roll to within an inch of the far edge. Lift and turn the dough and roll it out, continuing to lift, turn and roll until it is about ½ inch thick and two inches larger then the pan or flan ring.

Drape the circle of dough over the pan and gently roll the rolling pin out from under the dough and press the dough into the pan. With two fingers, press the dough around the edge of the pan to create a scalloped edge. Don’t be afraid to use as much of the dough as possible to be sure that the edges of the pie crust hold up during the baking process. Carefully cut off the remainder of the dough and trim the edges with a sharp knife. Place the pie pan on a cookie sheet while you prepare the filling and the glaze. 

THE FILLING
Judith Jones' variation
203 to 4 firm cooking apples
1 teaspoon lemon juice
2 tablespoon granulated sugar
A 2-quart mixing bowl

Peel and slice the apples, place in the bowl and sprinkle the lemon juice and the granulated sugar over the slices while making the apricot glaze. 

 

THE GLAZE
Judith Jones' variation
Use a good apricot preserves or currant jelly. In the demonstration photos, my stepmother used a gooseberry jam she makes from her own gooseberry bushes in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont. 

28½ cup of jam strained through a sieve
2 tablespoons granulated sugar, and 2 tablespoons extra sugar for sprinkling on the top of the apples
A small saucepan
A wooden spatula or spoon

Stir the strained apricot preserves or currant jelly with the sugar over moderately high heat for 2 to 3 minutes until thick enough to coat a spoon with a light film, and the last drops are sticky as they fall from the spoon. Do not boil beyond this point or the glaze will become brittle when it cools. 

While the glaze is still warm spread it over the interior surface of the pie crust in the pie pan making sure to cover all the dough. 

FINAL PREPARATION:
Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Place the apple slices in overlapping concentric circles around the inside of the pie crust as seen in the photos. Spread the warm preserve glaze over the apples and sprinkle with two tablespoons of granulated sugar,

Bake the tart in the upper third of the oven for about 30 minutes. If you have some leftover preserve glaze, warm it a little to make it easier to handle and spread over the hot apples to make them shine. Serve warm or cold with, if you wish, an accompaniment of heavy cream or whipped cream.

With grateful thanks to Julia Child and Judith Jones.

A Bientot and Happy Holidays,

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Photo collage header

The magic of this lovely apple tart is in its simplicity. Whenever I make it, I think of the millions of French housewives whose lives revolve around the daily meals they put on the table. Tarte aux Pommes must be a favorite dessert for many generations of French families, as well as those of us who love the art of French cooking. Once the crust is made, it’s a simple matter to seal it with a jam-based glaze and then fill it full of firm, flavorful apples, a fruit grown on almost every farm and easily available in farmers' markets from Paris to Cannes. And, here in the United States, you’ll find apples in every super market  - but, don’t forget to check the firmness and tartness of the apples you choose since our apples almost always travel many hundreds of miles to reach those shelves, and, in the process, lose their flavor. We are lucky here in Vermont to have local apples with remarkable local flavor!

Photographing the Process - See it as a Slideshow
When my stepmother, Judith Jones, decided to make an apple tart on the day after Thanksgiving, I pulled out my camera and shot the process not realizing that the result was a step-by-step look at how the tart is made. 

[galleryview id=2 panelWidth=523 panelHeight=351 transitionSpeed=50 transitionInterval=1000]

A Gift
So here it is, a gift to you for the holidays. I hope the photographs, along with the recipe, will allow you to easily make an apple tart, not just for a celebration dinner, but for your family and your friends, any day of the week–in your own kitchen!

Julia Child’s recipe below from Mastering The Art of French Cooking is the best way to master homemade pie dough. She doesn’t leave anything out and if you follow her instructions, you should have a perfect crust.

TARTE AUX POMMES

PATE BRISEE (THE DOUGH)
from Mastering The Art of French Cooking by Julia Child
For an 8 – 10 inch flan ring or false-bottomed cake pan 
22 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup sugar
6 ounces (1 ½ sticks) chilled butter cut into ½ bits
4 tablespoons chilled shortening
Ice water

Large mixing bowl
A pastry board
Waxed paper

Place the flour, salt, sugar, butter, and vegetable shortening in the mixing bowl. Rub the fat and dry ingredients together rapidly with the tips of your fingers until the fat is broken into bits the size of small oatmeal flakes. Do not overdo this step as the fat will be blended more thoroughly later.

A scant half cup of iced water, plus droplets more as needed. Add the water and blend quickly with one hand, fingers held together and slightly cupped as you rapidly gather the dough into a mass. Sprinkle up to 1 tablespoon more water by droplets over any unmassed remains and add them to the main body of the dough. Then press the dough firmly into a roughly shaped ball. It should just hold together and be pliable but not sticky. 

The frisage (final mixing of flour and butter to finish the dough): Place the dough on a lightly floured pastry board. With the heel of one hand, not the palm that is too warm, rapidly press the pastry by two-spoonful bits down on the board and away from you in a firm quick smear of about 6 inches.

Gather the dough into a loose ball, sprinkle with flour and wrap in wax paper. Either, place the wrapped ball of dough in the freezer for an hour, or in the refrigerator for 2 hours or overnight.

Rolling out the dough:  Because of the high butter content, roll out the dough as quickly as possible. Place the dough on a lightly floured board or marble. If the dough is very hard, beat with the rolling pin to soften it. Knead it into a fairly flat circle. It should be just malleable enough to turn over without cracking.

Lightly flour the top of the dough. Place the rolling pin across center and roll the pin back and forth with firm but gentle pressure to start the dough moving. Then, with a firm, even stroke, and always rolling away from you, start just below the center of the dough and roll to within an inch of the far edge. Lift and turn the dough and roll it out, continuing to lift, turn and roll until it is about ½ inch thick and two inches larger then the pan or flan ring.

Drape the circle of dough over the pan and gently roll the rolling pin out from under the dough and press the dough into the pan. With two fingers, press the dough around the edge of the pan to create a scalloped edge. Don’t be afraid to use as much of the dough as possible to be sure that the edges of the pie crust hold up during the baking process. Carefully cut off the remainder of the dough and trim the edges with a sharp knife. Place the pie pan on a cookie sheet while you prepare the filling and the glaze. 

THE FILLING
Judith Jones' variation
203 to 4 firm cooking apples
1 teaspoon lemon juice
2 tablespoon granulated sugar
A 2-quart mixing bowl

Peel and slice the apples, place in the bowl and sprinkle the lemon juice and the granulated sugar over the slices while making the apricot glaze. 

 

THE GLAZE
Judith Jones' variation
Use a good apricot preserves or currant jelly. In the demonstration photos, my stepmother used a gooseberry jam she makes from her own gooseberry bushes in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont. 

28½ cup of jam strained through a sieve
2 tablespoons granulated sugar, and 2 tablespoons extra sugar for sprinkling on the top of the apples
A small saucepan
A wooden spatula or spoon

Stir the strained apricot preserves or currant jelly with the sugar over moderately high heat for 2 to 3 minutes until thick enough to coat a spoon with a light film, and the last drops are sticky as they fall from the spoon. Do not boil beyond this point or the glaze will become brittle when it cools. 

While the glaze is still warm spread it over the interior surface of the pie crust in the pie pan making sure to cover all the dough. 

FINAL PREPARATION:
Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Place the apple slices in overlapping concentric circles around the inside of the pie crust as seen in the photos. Spread the warm preserve glaze over the apples and sprinkle with two tablespoons of granulated sugar,

Bake the tart in the upper third of the oven for about 30 minutes. If you have some leftover preserve glaze, warm it a little to make it easier to handle and spread over the hot apples to make them shine. Serve warm or cold with, if you wish, an accompaniment of heavy cream or whipped cream.

With grateful thanks to Julia Child and Judith Jones.

A Bientot and Happy Holidays,

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4 Responses to “Tarte aux Pommes – A Holiday Gift to You”

  1. MATTHEW ROSE says:

    Thanks for that Bronwyn, I’ve always wanted to make this and hey, I live in France, so I really should be an expert. Perhaps I’m better at making art than tart! But I think the flashing slide show is a great way to show recipes in action. Best, M

    • Bronwyn says:

      Thank you, Matthew. It was a surprise when I realized the photos made a “flipbook” of the process. Let me know how your tarte comes out!

  2. Carole Bugge says:

    How lovely, Bronwyn – brought back memories of many happy hours with Mastering The Art when I was a teen…. yes, indeed, Julia was my bible at that age. I might just make this for Christmas this year!

  3. Bronwyn says:

    How nice that the recipe brought back memories. I wish you would make it and let me know how it turns out! I, too, learned how to cook using “Mastering…” as my teacher. It was really interesting to see Judith put her “spin” on a classice recipe. Have a wonderful holiday!

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